1

I'm working on a Snake game in JavaScript and I want the snake to move only vertically or horizontally but it keeps moving diagonally. For example, if I press up, it moves up, but then if I press right, it'll move diagonally rather than only to the right.

const canvas = document.querySelector('canvas')
const ctx = canvas.getContext('2d')
const length_width = 15;
let snakeCoord = [
  {x:300,y:150},
  {x:315,y:150},
  {x:330,y:150},
  {x:345,y:150},
  {x:360,y:150},
  {x:375,y:150}
]; 

function drawSnakePart(snakePart) {
  ctx.beginPath();
  ctx.fillRect(snakePart.x, snakePart.y, length_width, length_width);
  ctx.strokeRect(snakePart.x, snakePart.y, length_width, length_width);
  ctx.closePath();
}

function drawSnake() {
  snakeCoord.forEach(drawSnakePart);
}

function moveSnake(dx, dy) {
  const head = {
    x: snakeCoord[0].x + dx,
    y: snakeCoord[0].y + dy
  };
  snakeCoord.unshift(head);
  snakeCoord.pop();
  ctx.clearRect(0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);
  drawSnake();
  setTimeout(function() {
    moveSnake(dx, dy)
  }, 100);
}

function keyPress(e) {
  let key = e.key;

  if (key == "ArrowUp") {
    if (snakeCoord[0].y - length_width !== snakeCoord[1].y) {
      moveSnake(0, -length_width);
    }
  } else if (key == "ArrowDown") {
    if (snakeCoord[0].y + length_width !== snakeCoord[1].y) {
      moveSnake(0, length_width);
    }
  } else if (key == "ArrowLeft") {
    if (snakeCoord[0].x - length_width !== snakeCoord[1].x) {
      moveSnake(-length_width, 0);
    }
  } else if (key == "ArrowRight") {
    if (snakeCoord[0].x + length_width !== snakeCoord[1].x) {
      moveSnake(length_width, 0);
    }
  }
}

drawSnake();
document.addEventListener("keyup", keyPress);
<canvas width="500" height="500"></canvas>

  • 2
    Please share your full JavaScript and HTML code. – Jack Bashford Dec 28 '18 at 4:26
  • Full code please. When I try to run the snippet, I get an error, "Uncaught ReferenceError: ctx is not defined". – Richard Chambers Dec 28 '18 at 4:28
  • There is code missing. Something like this: JS: var canvas = $("#canvas")[0]; var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");, HTML: <canvas id="canvas" width="400" height="400"></canvas>. Please, post the full code. (Similar game: jsfiddle.net/tbmluijten/RG76t/3 ) – Andriy Makukha Dec 28 '18 at 4:33
  • 3
    Seems the issue is when you change direction, you never stop the previous directional movement. Look up clearTimeout() – Phil Dec 28 '18 at 4:37
5

On every keypress and then recursively you are setting new timeout setTimeout(function(){ moveSnake(dx,dy) }, 100);. You end up with growing number of controdicting moveSnake calls.

You should save timeout to a variable and clear it with clearTimeout() on keypress before calling moveSnake().

1

Rather than have the keyboard handler call a move method that starts its own timer loop, you should have a single update routine that updates everything for one frame of animation. You should also drive rendering as fast as possible using requestAnimationFrame and have each render request the next animation frame. (See example at the link provided.) If you want slower animation then you can ratchet a step-by-step update of the scene with a separate timer. (Trust me, some day you'll want high frame-rate animation, even in your step-by-step game.)

I was bored so I decided to implement some changes to your code.

const canvas = document.querySelector('canvas')
const ctx = canvas.getContext('2d')
const length_width = 15;
let snakeCoord = [
  {x:300,y:150},
  {x:315,y:150},
  {x:330,y:150},
  {x:345,y:150},
  {x:360,y:150},
  {x:375,y:150}
]; 

let snake = {
  dir: {dx: -1, dy: 0},
  nextDir: [], // buffered direction changes
  speed: 5, // steps per second
  ratchet: 0
};

function drawSnakePart(snakePart) {
  ctx.beginPath();
  ctx.fillRect(snakePart.x, snakePart.y, length_width, length_width);
  ctx.strokeRect(snakePart.x, snakePart.y, length_width, length_width);
  ctx.closePath();
}

function drawSnake() {
  snakeCoord.forEach(drawSnakePart);
}

function moveSnake() {
  if (snake.nextDir[0]) {
    // only change directions if it doesn't result in doubling back on yourself
    if (snakeCoord[0].x + snake.nextDir[0].dx * length_width !== snakeCoord[1].x
      && snakeCoord[0].y + snake.nextDir[0].dy * length_width !== snakeCoord[1].y) {
      snake.dir = snake.nextDir[0];
    }
    snake.nextDir.shift(1);
  }

  const head = {
    x: snakeCoord[0].x + snake.dir.dx * length_width,
    y: snakeCoord[0].y + snake.dir.dy * length_width
  };
  snakeCoord.unshift(head);
  snakeCoord.pop();
}

function keyPress(e) {
  let key = e.key;
  if (key == "ArrowUp") {
    setDirection(0,-1);
  } else if (key == "ArrowDown") {
    setDirection(0, 1);
  } else if (key == "ArrowLeft") {
    setDirection(-1, 0);
  } else if (key == "ArrowRight") {
    setDirection(1, 0);
  }
  e.preventDefault();
}

drawSnake();
let lastTime = new Date();
window.requestAnimationFrame(render);

function setDirection(dx, dy) {
  snake.nextDir.push({dx, dy}); // overwrite any pending direction changes.
}

function update() {
  let now = Date.now();
  let elapsed = (now - lastTime) / 1000;
  snake.ratchet += elapsed * snake.speed;
  while (snake.ratchet >= 1) {
    moveSnake();
    snake.ratchet -= 1;
  }
  lastTime = now;
}

function render() {
  ctx.clearRect(0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);
  update();
  drawSnake();
  window.requestAnimationFrame(render);
}
document.addEventListener("keydown", keyPress);
* {
  overflow: hidden
}
<canvas width="500" height="500"></canvas>

Made this a high frame rate render loop. Employed a ratchet mechanism to move the snake discretely every so often at some rate (see snake.speed). Added a property of the snake which is its direction. (see snake.dir). Buffered keystrokes of requested direction changes (see snake.nextDir) Simplified the logic of preventing the snake from doubling back on itself. Eat up one direction change per move step.

You still need to do the snake self-collision. (Assuming this is what you're up to, with a traditional snake game.)

Anyway, I hope this helps you, or someone else.

  • You have to give focus to the canvas by clicking on it before it will accept key strokes I believe. – Wyck Dec 28 '18 at 5:46

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