51

I have the following piece of code:

List<Object> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.addAll(method1());
if(list.isEmpty()) { list.addAll(method2()); }
if(list.isEmpty()) { list.addAll(method3()); }
if(list.isEmpty()) { list.addAll(method4()); }
if(list.isEmpty()) { list.addAll(method5()); }
if(list.isEmpty()) { list.addAll(method6()); }
return list;

Is there a nice way to add elements conditionally, maybe using stream operations? I would like to add elements from method2 only if the list is empty otherwise return and so on.

Edit: It's worth to mention that the methods contain heavy logic so need to be prevented from execution.

  • What do the methods return as object, exactly? – Eric Duminil Dec 29 '18 at 8:47
45

I would simply use a stream of suppliers and filter on List.isEmpty:

Stream.<Supplier<List<Object>>>of(() -> method1(), 
                                  () -> method2(), 
                                  () -> method3(), 
                                  () -> method4(), 
                                  () -> method5(), 
                                  () -> method6())
    .map(Supplier<List<Object>>::get)
    .filter(l -> !l.isEmpty())
    .findFirst()
    .ifPresent(list::addAll);

return list;

findFirst() will prevent unnecessary calls to methodN() when the first non-empty list is returned by one of the methods.

EDIT:
As remarked in comments below, if your list object is not initialized with anything else, then it makes sense to just return the result of the stream directly:

return  Stream.<Supplier<List<Object>>>of(() -> method1(), 
                                          () -> method2(), 
                                          () -> method3(), 
                                          () -> method4(), 
                                          () -> method5(), 
                                          () -> method6())
    .map(Supplier<List<Object>>::get)
    .filter(l -> !l.isEmpty())
    .findFirst()
    .orElseGet(ArrayList::new);
  • 5
    Worth to note that, if methodX() returns a List and not another type of Collection, it might be possible to return that list directly, instead of creating a new list and adding to that: .map(Supplier::get).filter(s -> !s.isEmpty()).findFirst().orElse(emptyList());. Whether this is appropriate or not is not possible to determine from the question. – Magnilex Dec 28 '18 at 12:01
  • 1
    @Ricola Without defining it explicitly, the compiler doesn't know the target type of lambda expressions. The alternative would have been to do it in two steps, explicitly declaring a Stream<Supplier<List<Object>>> as the type of the stream. – ernest_k Dec 28 '18 at 12:16
  • 5
    You can also use this::method1 to reduce ther amount of boilerplate – Boris the Spider Dec 28 '18 at 13:19
  • 1
    @BoristheSpider Agreed (just didn't want to assume that the code is in an instance method) – ernest_k Dec 28 '18 at 13:21
  • 3
    @SebastiaanvandenBroek certainly a matter of taste - I can't agree with your assessment. The code in the question has the same logic copy/pasted 5 times. The code above has no such repetition - to me this makes the functional logic rather superior. – Boris the Spider Dec 28 '18 at 20:07
67

You could try to check the return value of addAll. It will return true whenever the list has been modified, so try this:

List<Object> list = new ArrayList<>();
// ret unused, otherwise it doesn't compile
boolean ret = list.addAll(method1())
    || list.addAll(method2()) 
    || list.addAll(method3())
    || list.addAll(method4())
    || list.addAll(method5())
    || list.addAll(method6());
return list;

Because of lazy evaluation, the first addAll operation that added at least one element will prevent the rest from bein called. I like the fact that "||" expresses the intent quite well.

  • 5
    one of the rare cases where one cares about the return value of addAll. indeed very clever, efficient and readable! ;-). – Aomine Dec 28 '18 at 12:30
  • 5
    @Aomine I don't find the misuse of boolean expressions to mimic ordered executions readable and maintainable at all. The next best bloke might reorder the expressions because "it's an OR expression, the order shouldn't matter" and boom you have a hard to find bug. The necessary comment about having a variable just for it to compile imho is a hint of bad design as well. So while this answers the question somehow, I wouldn't recommend to use this in production code. – Frank Hopkins Dec 28 '18 at 13:24
  • 5
    @Darkwing It's not compiler/jvm specific behaviour, language specification itsself defines that behaviour of lazy evaluation. I'm not assuming anything, I know how the language is defined. The behaviour is widely known, e.g. lazy evaluation used in order to place a null check in the first place, dereferencing it afterwards. At least you have a very strange definition of assuming something that is defined in the language specification. The word assuming implies a certain uncertainity about the actual behaviour. If you know for sure what you are doing, you don't assume it. – Dorian Gray Dec 28 '18 at 13:51
  • 10
    @Darkwing but... the order of OR does matter! A logical OR is a short-circuit operation and is used extensively exactly because of that. – Sebastiaan van den Broek Dec 28 '18 at 16:01
  • 4
    this is the only solution here I would go with, an extremely rare case where addAll result actually matters. beautifully done, sir! – Eugene Dec 28 '18 at 22:14
17

A way of doing it without repeating yourself is to extract a method doing it for you:

private void addIfEmpty(List<Object> targetList, Supplier<Collection<?>> supplier) {
    if (targetList.isEmpty()) {
        targetList.addAll(supplier.get());
    }
}

And then

List<Object> list = new ArrayList<>();
addIfEmpty(list, this::method1);
addIfEmpty(list, this::method2);
addIfEmpty(list, this::method3);
addIfEmpty(list, this::method4);
addIfEmpty(list, this::method5);
addIfEmpty(list, this::method6);
return list;

Or even use a for loop:

List<Supplier<Collection<?>>> suppliers = Arrays.asList(this::method1, this::method2, ...);
List<Object> list = new ArrayList<>();
suppliers.forEach(supplier -> this.addIfEmpty(list, supplier));

Now DRY is not the most important aspect. If you think your original code is easier to read and understand, then keep it like that.

  • You should rather name the method addIfEmpty instead of addIfNotEmpty – Ricola Dec 28 '18 at 12:06
  • @Ricola good point, indeed. – JB Nizet Dec 28 '18 at 12:17
11

You could make your code nicer by creating the method

public void addAllIfEmpty(List<Object> list, Supplier<List<Object>> method){
    if(list.isEmpty()){
        list.addAll(method.get());
    }
}

Then you can use it like this (I assumed your methods are not static methods, if they are you need to reference them using ClassName::method1)

List<Object> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.addAll(method1());
addAllIfEmpty(list, this::method2);
addAllIfEmpty(list, this::method3);
addAllIfEmpty(list, this::method4);
addAllIfEmpty(list, this::method5);
addAllIfEmpty(list, this::method6);
return list;

If you really want to use a Stream, you could do this

 Stream.<Supplier<List<Object>>>of(this::method1, this::method2, this::method3, this::method4, this::method5, this::method6)
                .collect(ArrayList::new, this::addAllIfEmpty, ArrayList::addAll);

IMO it makes it more complicated, depending on how your methods are referenced, it might be better to use a loop

6

You could create a method as such:

public static List<Object> lazyVersion(Supplier<List<Object>>... suppliers){
      return Arrays.stream(suppliers)
                .map(Supplier::get)
                .filter(s -> !s.isEmpty()) // or .filter(Predicate.not(List::isEmpty)) as of JDK11
                .findFirst()
                .orElseGet(Collections::emptyList);
}

and then call it as follows:

lazyVersion(() -> method1(),
            () -> method2(),
            () -> method3(),
            () -> method4(),
            () -> method5(),
            () -> method6());

method name for illustration purposes only.

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