61

In a class based component, I can easily write some code like this:

import * as React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';

interface IProps<T> {
    collapsed: boolean;
    listOfData: T[];
    displayData: (data: T, index: number) => React.ReactNode;
}

class CollapsableDataList<T> extends React.Component<IProps<T>> {
    render () {
        if (!this.props.collapsed) {
            return <span>total: {this.props.listOfData.length}</span>
        } else {
            return (
                <>
                    {
                        this.props.listOfData.map(this.props.displayData)
                    }
                </>
            )
        }
    }
}

render(
    <CollapsableDataList
        collapsed={false}
        listOfData={[{a: 1, b: 2}, {a: 3, b: 4}]}
        displayData={(data, index) => (<span key={index}>{data.a + data.b}</span>)}
    />,
    document.getElementById('root'),
)

Actually this CollapsableDataList component should be a functional component because it's stateless, but I can't figure out how to write a function component and use generics in props, any advise for me?

1
78

You can't create a functional component with a type annotation and make it generic. So this will NOT work as T is not defined and you can't define it on the variable level:

const CollapsableDataList : React.FunctionComponent<IProps<T>> = p => { /*...*/ } 

You can however skip the type annotation, and make the function generic and type props explicitly.

import * as React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';

interface IProps<T> {
    collapsed: boolean;
    listOfData: T[];
    displayData: (data: T, index: number) => React.ReactNode;
}
const CollapsableDataList = <T extends object>(props: IProps<T> & { children?: ReactNode }) => {
    if (!props.collapsed) {
        return <span>total: {props.listOfData.length}</span>
    } else {
        return (
            <>
                {
                    props.listOfData.map(props.displayData)
                }
            </>
        )
    }
}


render(
    <CollapsableDataList
        collapsed={false}
        listOfData={[{a: 1, b: 2}, {a: 3, c: 4}]}
        displayData={(data, index) => (<span key={index}>{data.a + (data.b || 0)}</span>)}
    />,
    document.getElementById('root'),
)
6
  • I'm worrying about some HOC require you pass component which has explicit type (like ComponentClass or FunctionalComponent type), and then those functional components which don't have a type annotation won't pass the type check. (not test yet)
    – hronro
    Dec 28 '18 at 12:23
  • @hronro Typescript uses structural typing, so the parameters of the function are more important than the declared type. You will still have problems with HOCs, because Typescript does not have higher order types. So the type parameter will get lost when you pass it to the HOC. But that is a general generic component issue, not so much a type annotation issue. Dec 28 '18 at 12:30
  • 1
    @AndyO I just copied the children definition from react definitions I think. Adding the generic type parameter while possible is not necessary, T will be inferred. I always prefer to let the compiler do inference when it can. May 19 '19 at 5:52
  • 1
    @TitianCernicova-Dragomir Right, I missed that the type can be inferred here, thanks! (I also like to use TS' inference capabilities as much as possible)
    – AndyO
    May 19 '19 at 9:54
  • 3
    You can use PropsWithChildren<IProps<T>> and get rig of interface intersection Oct 29 '20 at 15:54
18

The type React.FC is essentially this:

<P = {}>(props: PropsWithChildren<P>, context?: any) => ReactElement | null

so instead of this (which isn't allowed):

const Example: React.FC<Props<P>> = (props) => {
  // return a React element or null
}

you can use this:

const Example = <P extends unknown>(props: PropsWithChildren<Props<P>>): ReactElement | null => {
  // return a React element or null
}

For example:

const Example = <P extends unknown>({ value }: PropsWithChildren<{ value: P }>): ReactElement | null => {
  return <pre>{JSON.stringify(value)}</pre>
}

Or, more strictly, if the component doesn't use the children prop and won't return null:

const Example = <P>({ value }: { value: P }): ReactElement => {
  return <pre>{value}</pre>
}

then use the typed component as <Example<string> value="foo"/>

9

Before addressing the functional component, I assume the original code example is missing the generic in JSX component as I don't see it passed to the IProps interface. I. e.:

interface Ab {
  a: number;
  b: number;
}

...

// note passing the type <Ab> which will eventually make it to your IProps<T> interface and cascade the type for listOfData
return (
<CollapsableDataList<Ab>
  collapsed={false}
  listOfData={[{a: 1, b: 2}, {a: 3, c: 4}]}
  ...
/>
)

Ok now with a little effort you actually can have a functional component with generic props.

You are stuck using 'modern' syntax though as it employs an assignment and arrow function which is of no use for your generic case:

// using this syntax there is no way to pass generic props
const CollapsableDataList: React.FC<IProps> = ({ collapsed, listOfData }) => {
  // logic etc.
  return (
  // JSX output
  );
}

Let's rewrite the variable assignment as a good old function:

// we are now able to to write our function component with generics
function CollapsableDataList<T>({ collapsed, listOfData }: IProps<T> & { children?: React.ReactNode }): React.ReactElement {
  // logic etc.
  return (
  // JSX output
  );
}

The children workaround is not necessarily needed if the component does not use the children prop but I've added it to highlight the fact that it has to be retyped manually as React.FC did that for us before.

9
type Props<T> = {
    active: T;
    list: T[];
    onChange: (tab: T) => void;
};

export const Tabs = <T,>({ active, list, onChange }: Props<T>): JSX.Element => {
    return (
        <>
            {list.map((tab) => (
                <Button onClick={() => onChange(tab)} active={tab === active}>
                    {tab} 
                </Button>
            ))}
        </>
    );
};
1
  • 1
    Notice the dangling , inside <T,> this fixes a bug with the compiler and allows using a simple generic.
    – Mat Lipe
    Aug 3 '21 at 16:38
0

supplement for #1.

If you want to export component as FunctionComponent and pass eslint displayName error.

you can do it bellow.

const yourComponentWithLowerCase: <T>(props: PropsWithChildren<Props<T>>) => ReactElement | null = (props) => {
  // code
}

export const YourComponentWithUpperCase = yourComponentWithLowerCase;
(YourComponentWithUpperCase as FunctionComponent).displayName = 'something'


0

This answer is a good example since it properly defines the props and the return type of the function.

As an alternative these can be defined as functions instead of arrow functions. This gets around the need to extend the prop type to hint to the TS compiler that this not a react component.

export function CollapsableDataList<T>(
  props: PropsWithChildren<IProps<T>>
): ReturnType<FunctionComponent<IProps<T>>> {
  // ...
}

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