18

I am trying to sort an array which contains strings, numbers, and numbers as strings (ex. '1','2'). I want to sort this array so that the sorted array contains numbers first and then strings that contain a number and then finally strings.

var arr = [9,5,'2','ab','3',-1 ] // to be sorted
arr.sort()
// arr = [-1, 5, 9, "2", "3","ab"] // expected result
//arr = [-1, "2", 5, 9, "ab"] // actual result

I have also tried

var number =[];
var char =[];
arr.forEach(a=>{
 if(typeof a == 'number') number.push(a);
 else char.push(a);
})
arr = (number.sort((a,b)=> a>b)).concat(char.sort((a,b)=> a>b))
// arr = [-1, 5, 9, "2", "3","ab"] // expected result
//  arr = [-1, 5, 9, "2", "ab", "3"]// actual result
  • Is there any reason for "2" and "3" to be after 9? For that kind of sort, you can either sort twice or make a single unique complex sort. – briosheje Dec 28 '18 at 12:20
  • @briosheje because they are strings. Looks like OP wants numbers first, then strings. – ksav Dec 28 '18 at 12:21
  • 2
    @briosheje "2" and "3" are after 9 because they are strings, So it goes [ints, integer_strings, non_numeric_strings] it seems – Nick Parsons Dec 28 '18 at 12:21
  • How should the "numbers as strings" be sorted? As nbers or as strings? – Jonas Wilms Dec 29 '18 at 13:27

11 Answers 11

4

It seems you have done most of the work in your second attempt. All I have done here is used Array.concat to join the sorted results of number and char together.

var arr = [9, 5, '2', 'ab', '3', -1] // to be sorted
var number = [];
var char = [];
arr.forEach(a => {
  if (typeof a == 'number') number.push(a);
  else char.push(a);
})


var sorted = number.sort().concat(char.sort());
console.log(sorted)

  • Hi , I have tried this "result = (number.sort((a,b)=> a>b)).concat(char.sort((a,b)=> a>b))". But i didn't get the expected output. Could you tell me how these two are different – Komal Bansal Dec 28 '18 at 12:35
  • 3
    @komal a>b returns true or false whereas a number is expected – Jonas Wilms Dec 28 '18 at 12:42
20

The shortest is probably:

 arr.sort((a, b) => ((typeof b === "number") - (typeof a === "number")) || (a > b ? 1 : -1));
  • It doesn't sort the string numbers though. Should it? – NikxDa Dec 29 '18 at 4:06
  • @nikxda it actually should – Jonas Wilms Dec 29 '18 at 10:19
  • Having this array: ["a", "5", "1", "-1", 17, "abc", 23, -5, 0, "17"] sorts the "17" before the "5". – NikxDa Dec 29 '18 at 13:24
  • @NikxDa well it sorts them lexicographically, not sure if that is wanted – Jonas Wilms Dec 29 '18 at 13:31
  • So this is not a 'try', yeah? – Volodymyr I. Apr 25 at 9:38
10

You can sort the integers first and then the non-integers by using .filter() to separate both data-types.

See working example below (read code comments for explanation):

const arr = [9,5,'2','ab','3',-1];

const nums = arr.filter(n => typeof n == "number").sort(); // If the data type of a given element is a number store it in this array (and then sort)
const non_nums = arr.filter(x => typeof x != "number").sort(); // Store everything that is not a number in an array (and then sort)

const res = [...nums, ...non_nums]; // combine the two arrays
console.log(res); // [-1, 5, 9, "2", "3", "ab"]

  • 2
    performance here is bad. Jonas's solution wraps it up with a single sort. – Jony-Y Dec 28 '18 at 13:41
  • 6
    On the contrary, performance is better. This is called divide and conquer. Since sorting is usually O(n.log(n)), making 2 sorts of cardinal n is better than making one sort of cardinal 2n. Anyway, arguing about performance for sorting a few items is pointless. – YSC Dec 28 '18 at 14:34
  • 2
    @Jony-Y disagree. If nums.includes(x) would be replaced with typeof x === "string" it would be significantly faster (but it takes more memory) [in theory, performance in JS is always a non-deterministic thing] – Jonas Wilms Dec 28 '18 at 15:44
  • @JonasWilms To have the same effect, it should be !== "number". – wizzwizz4 Dec 28 '18 at 15:46
  • not sure you're correct here, you have to pay O(n) then O(mlogm) then O(n*m) then O(plogp) where as in the other solution you have to pay nlogn – Jony-Y Dec 28 '18 at 15:49
2

Here you are!

const arr = [9,5,'2','ab','3',-1 ]

const numbers = arr.filter(i => typeof i === 'number');
const numerics = arr.filter(i => typeof i === 'string' && !isNaN(i));
const strings = arr.filter(i => typeof i === 'string' && isNaN(i));

numbers.sort();
numerics.sort();
strings.sort()

const result = [].concat(numbers, numerics, strings)

console.log(result)

My strategy was to first find all the three chunks (numbers, numerics and strings), then just concatting them.

2

I wanted to take this a little bit further and avoid looping array multiple times for decreased complexity and therefore increased performance.

You could do a custom sort function where you calculate string values based on each character charCode value and sum them up and other hand handle numbers as they are.

In this code example I then made string values in power of 5, that we can assure string values are larger than numeric values. This could be tweaked based on use case and which kind of data are you handling.

Downside of this approach is that performance is impacted based on how long strings are you handling so be aware of that as well.

var arr = [90000, 5, '2', 'ab', 'aa', '3', -1] // to be sorted
arr.sort((a,b) => {
  if(typeof a === 'string') {
    let temp = 0
    for (let s of a) temp += s.charCodeAt(0)
    a = Math.pow(temp, 5)
  }
  if(typeof b === 'string') {
    let temp = 0
    for(let s of b) temp += s.charCodeAt(0)
    b = Math.pow(temp, 5)
  }
  return a - b
})

console.log(arr) // [-1, 5, 90000, "2", "3", "aa", "ab"]

2

Try using this:

var arr = [9, 5, '2', 'ab', '3', -1];
var number = [];
var strInt = [];
var char = [];
arr.forEach(a => {
  if (typeof a === "number") {
    number.push(a);
  } else if (typeof a === "string" && /\d/.test(a)) {
    strInt.push(a);
  } else {
    char.push(a);
  }
});
arr = number.concat(strInt.concat(char));
console.log(arr);

What this does is makes three arrays, one for numbers, one for strings containing numbers, and one for strings. It sorts each element into the appropriate array, then finally concatenates them all together in the correct order.

  • @NurbolAlpysbayev Fixed now. – Jack Bashford Dec 28 '18 at 12:30
1

Try this

const arr = [9, 5, '2', 'ab', '3', 'AB', -1];
const sortedArr = arr.sort((a, b) => {
    if (typeof a === 'number' && typeof b === 'number') {
        return a - b;
    } else if (typeof a === 'number') {
        return -1;
    } else if (typeof b === 'number') {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return a > b ? 1 : -1;
    }
});

console.log(sortedArr);

This uses the Array.prototype.sort optional function to sort elements in one array. It must return a number. If the number > 0, b goes first. If the number < 0, a goes first. If it's 0, their position remains unchanged.

  • Explanation added with a link to MDN. – Sergio Tx Dec 28 '18 at 12:34
1
var arr=[9,5,'2','ab','3',-1];
    var string_arr=[];
    var number_arr=[];
    var string_number_arr=[];
    for(var i=0;i<arr.length;i++)
    {

        if(typeof(arr[i])=='number')
        {
            number_arr.push(arr[i]);

        }
        else if((Number(arr[i]).toString())=="NaN")
        {
            string_number_arr.push(arr[i]);

        }
        else
        {
            string_arr.push(arr[i]);
        }

    }
    string_arr.sort();
    number_arr.sort();
    string_number_arr.sort();
    var arr=number_arr.concat(string_arr,string_number_arr);
    console.log(arr);
1

You can use Array .sort() method anyway.

You just need to provide a function to control sorting criteria for every comparsion.

Example:

// First of all discretize all kinds of data you want to deal with
function typeClassify(v) {
    return typeof v == "number"
        ? "N"
        : isNaN(v) ? "s" : "n"
        // (Treat all non numeric values as strings)
    ;
};


// Second: implement the sorting function
function sortCriteria(a, b) {
    var mode = typeClassify(a) + typeClassify(b);
    switch (mode) {
        case "NN":
            return a - b;
        case "nn":
            return Number(a) - Number(b);
        case "ss":
            return a == b
                ? 0
                : a > b
                    ? -1 : 1
            ;
        case "Nn":
        case "Ns":
        case "ns":
            return -1;
        case "nN":
        case "sN":
        case "sn":
            return 1;
        default:
            throw "This must never happen";
    };
};

// And finally provide that function as a callback for .sort() method
var arr = [9,5,'2','ab','3',-1 ] // to be sorted
console.log(arr.sort(sortCriteria));

// arr = [-1, 5, 9, "2", "3","ab"] // expected result
// arr = [ -1, 5, 9, '2', '3', 'ab' ] // obtained result

Obviously the functionality of typeClassify() function can be flattened into sortCriteria() to save a function call on every comparsion. I preferred to put it apart for the sake of clarity.

1

We can utilize the localeCompare function inside the sort function to sort the array as

var items = [3, 'rob', 'peter', 43, 0, -222];
console.log(items.sort((a, b) => {
  return a.toString().localeCompare(b.toString());
}));

0

var myArray = [9, 5, '2', 'ab', '3', -1]
myArray.sort((a, b) => {
  let aTest = /^\d+$/.test(a);
  let bTest = /^\d+$/.test(b);
  if (aTest && bTest) {
    return parseInt(a) - parseInt(b);
  } else if (aTest) {
    return -1;
  } else if (bTest) {
    return 1;
  } else {
    return a > b ? 1 : -1;
  }
})

console.log(myArray)

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