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From Computer Representation of Floating Point Numbers I have learnt the floating point representation of computer.
According to the tutorial, for 32-bit float, the smallest positive normalized number that can be stored is 2^(-126),and the largest normalized number is (2-2^(-23))*2^(127) ≈ 2^(128). However, the precision is limited by the 23-bit significand.

In my opinion, the 32-bit float can represent 2^60 without any error, because:

  1. The sign: 1
  2. The exponent: 10111011 (decimal 187 i.e. 60+127)
  3. The significand: 0000 ... 0000 (23 zeros)

It is totally enough to use the exponent and the hidden bit (1) of significand to represent 2^60.

My test code are as following (VS2013 + win10):

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>
#include <bitset>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    union
    {
        float input;   // assumes sizeof(float) == sizeof(int)
        int   output;
    }    data;

    data.input = pow(2., 60.);

    std::bitset<sizeof(float) * CHAR_BIT>   bits(data.output);


    std::cout << "Total: " << bits << std::endl;


    cout << "Sign: " << bits[31] << endl << "Exponent: ";

    for (int i = 30; i > 22; i--)
    {
        cout << bits[i];
    }
    cout << endl << "Significand: ";

    for (int i = 22; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        cout << bits[i];
    }
    cout << endl;


    cout.precision(20);
    cout << data.input << endl;
    printf("%f", data.input);
}

And I get the output:

    Total: 01011101100000000000000000000000
    Sign: 0
    Exponent: 10111011
    Significand: 00000000000000000000000
    1152921504606847000
    1152921504606847000.000000

I print the binary representation and it's correct. But I am puzzled why the last three digits are zero. The correct output should be 1152921504606846976.

Furthermore, I change the code as following:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>
#include <bitset>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    for (int i = 1; i < 65; i++)
    {
        union
        {
            float input;   // assumes sizeof(float) == sizeof(int)
            int   output;
        }    data;

        data.input = pow(2, i);

        std::bitset<sizeof(float) * CHAR_BIT>   bits(data.output);


        cout.precision(20);
        cout << i << ": " << data.input << endl;
        //printf("%f\n", data.input);
    }

}

And the output is:

1: 2
2 : 4
3 : 8
    ......
55 : 36028797018963968
56 : 72057594037927936
57 : 144115188075855870
58 : 288230376151711740
59 : 576460752303423490
60 : 1152921504606847000
61 : 2305843009213694000
62 : 4611686018427387900
63 : 9223372036854775800
64 : 18446744073709552000

The zero begin to occur from 2^57. Can anyone tell me why this happen?

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  • printf and cout only bother to print as many significant digits as is necessary to parse the text back to the original value. Presumably, 1152921504606847000 is closer to 2^60 than to any other number representable in a float. – Igor Tandetnik Dec 28 '18 at 15:06
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    BTW there's a dedicated function for calculating powers of 2, its name is ldexp and it is much faster then pow(2.0, x). The relationship is pow(2.0, x) == ldexp(1.0, x) – Ben Voigt Dec 28 '18 at 15:08
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    And your program has undefined behavior as written -- better use memcpy to get the bit representation of your float into an integer. – Ben Voigt Dec 28 '18 at 15:10
  • @IgorTandetnik: printf and cout may produce many more digits—variations in behavior after the 17th digit (in this case) are due to implementation choices, not due to the specification of printf and cout generally. – Eric Postpischil Dec 28 '18 at 21:12
  • @EricPostpischil Yes, I guess the right formulation would be "One shouldn't expect printf or cout to print any more significant digits than are necessary to parse the number back." – Igor Tandetnik Dec 28 '18 at 21:27
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This is not a failure of float to represent 260 correctly. It is a failure of Microsoft’s software to convert 260 to decimal correctly (that is, the failure is in the formatting code, not in the float arithmetic, although Microsoft’s pow implementation was also inaccurate previously). The software you are using produces only 17 decimal digits, regardless of the actual value involved. The same program compiled with Apple LLVM 10.0.0 (clang-1000.11.45.5) produces:

55: 36028797018963968
56: 72057594037927936
57: 144115188075855872
58: 288230376151711744
59: 576460752303423488
60: 1152921504606846976
61: 2305843009213693952
62: 4611686018427387904
63: 9223372036854775808
64: 18446744073709551616

Microsoft’s behavior is permitted by the C standard but is, of course, not good mathematically.

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  • Thank you for your clear answer! I try float a = pow(2., 57); float b = a / 2; cout.precision(20); cout << b<< endl; I get 72057594037927936 again, which confirms your statement. – Li.Chenyang Dec 29 '18 at 2:11

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