4

I want to execute a defined class function from an Element inside my Web Component:

customElements.define('first-component', class FirstComponent extends HTMLElement {
    constructor() {
        super();
     }

     log() {
        console.log('Well Done!')
     }

     connectedCallback() {
        this.innerHTML = '<button onclick="log()">Do it</button>'
     }
});

State right now: ReferenceError: log is not defined

8

With parentElement, or closest()

In order to call the log() method of the custom element, you'll have to get a reference on it.

In your example, the custom element is the parent element of the <button> element, so you should call the parentElement property of the button as already stated by @Smankusors:

<button onclick="this.parentElement.log()>Do it</button>

With getRootNode()

Alternately, in a more complex DOM tree, and if a Shadow DOM is used, you can use getRootNode() combined with host to get the custom element reference.

customElements.define('first-component', class FirstComponent extends HTMLElement {
     log() {
        console.log('Well Done!')
     }

     connectedCallback() {
        this.attachShadow({mode: 'open'})
            .innerHTML = '<button onclick="this.getRootNode().host.log()">Do it</button>'
     }
})
<first-component></first-component>


With a unique identifier

You can also call the custom element by its id property (if it has one) :

customElements.define('first-component', class FirstComponent extends HTMLElement {
     log() {
        console.log('Well Done!')
     }

     connectedCallback() {
        if (!this.id)
            this.id = "_id"
        this.innerHTML = `<button onclick="${this.id}.log()">Do it</button>`
     }
})
<first-component></first-component>


With handleEvent()

For security reasons, you can avoid inline script and implement the handleEvent() method, then call inside it a specific method depending on some criterions :

customElements.define('first-component', class FirstComponent extends HTMLElement {
    log() {
        console.log('Well Done!')
    }
     
    handleEvent(ev) {
        if (ev.target.innerText == 'Do it')
            this.log()
    }

    connectedCallback() {
        this.innerHTML = '<button>Do it</button>'
        this.addEventListener('click', this)
    }
})
<first-component></first-component>

4
2

That shouldn't be log(), but this.log(), because that log function scope is only that element, not in window scope, so your code should be

customElements.define('first-component', class FirstComponent extends HTMLElement {
    constructor() {
        super();
     }

     log() {
        console.log('Well Done!')
     }

     connectedCallback()
        this.innerHTML = '<button onclick="this.parentElement.log()">Do it</button>'
     }
});

-- EDIT -- Sorry, my mistake, I just saw that you added button inside custom element, well... It should be this.parentElement.log() if you still want to prefer inline

3
  • Also tried that before. The Problem is that this will bind to the button and also fail. – Fabian Dec 28 '18 at 20:09
  • Did you even try this? This does not work, this is still the window scope here – Mathias W Dec 28 '18 at 20:10
  • oops, sorry, well you can try this.parentElement.log() – Smankusors Dec 28 '18 at 20:18
0

Since the DOM and its elements does not have any knowledge of the scope it lives in, just setting the value of the innerHTML won't work since log does not exist on window which is the DOM scope. Hence this, it's best practice to create the element and append it to the Shadow Dom of the custom element and at the same time add the eventListener to the button.

customElements.define('first-component', class FirstComponent extends HTMLElement {
    constructor() {
        super();
     }

     log() {
        console.log('Well Done!')
     }

     connectedCallback() { // This parentheses was also missing
         var shadow = this.attachShadow({mode: 'open'});
         const button = document.createElement("button");
         button.textContent = 'Do it!';
         button.addEventListener('click', () => this.log());
         shadow.appendChild(button);
     }
});
<first-component id="component"></first-component>

2
  • It works but I dislike this solution, haha ! Thank you – Fabian Dec 28 '18 at 20:11
  • Not sure if there is any other solutions tbh @Fabian . I guess you can have a peek at stackoverflow.com/questions/37866237/… to see if that helps, I know it's pointing to react but it more or less native – Mathias W Dec 28 '18 at 20:17
-1

You should - for many reasons - stop using inline event listeners. Instead, use addEventListener - in this case in the connectedCallback.

customElements.define('first-element', class FirstElement extends HTMLElement {
    constructor() {
        super();
     }

     log() {
        console.log('Well Done!')
     }

     connectedCallback() {
        const btn = document.createElement('button');
        btn.textContent = 'Do it!';
        btn.type = 'button'; // otherwise it's type=submit
        btn.addEventListener('click', this.log);
        this.appendChild(btn);
     }
});
<first-element></first-element>

3
  • Why is using inline event listeners bad? I think its more readable and many Frameworks follow this pattern – Fabian Dec 28 '18 at 20:24
  • Those frameworks parse the HTML and replace the inline event listeners with addEventListener internally. With native web components, you're in a different context. Inline event listeners - aside from being bad for the same reasons inline styles are bad - also do not comply with content security policy which cannot be applied on code using inline event listeners. – connexo Dec 28 '18 at 22:44

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