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Update 01/02

Please see screenshot. I reduced app to 2 tables: Addresses and Users.

Running sequelize db:migrate with migrations/models below creates an extra 'users' table. See Catalog section. Clicking on 'users' pops up message "The table you are trying to edit is a model-only stub, created to represent missing external tables referenced by foreign keys."

Diagram does not have the extra 'users' table. A connection is not being drawn for Addresses.userId to Users.id like it should be.

Anybody have any thoughts on why or how to fix?

  • Running on Macbook OS X 10.14.2
  • Sequelize version: Sequelize CLI [Node: 10.7.0, CLI: 5.4.0, ORM: 4.42.0]
  • MySql Server version: 8.0.13
  • MySql Workbench version is also: 8.0.13

MySql Workbench shows extra 'users' table

Update 12/30

In MySql Workbench, Database > Reverse Engineer renders a diagram of tables but foreign/primary key lines are not drawn. DB engine is InnoDB.

Am using Sequelize migrations/models to create the DB and relationships. For example, Addresses table has a 'userId' foreign key to Users table.

In the EER diagram's Catalog section of tables, somehow there is a 'Users' table and 'users' table. The foreign key Addresses.userId points to lowercased 'users' table, a table that should not exist. The lowercased table doesn't appear in the diagram, nor in the DB table list in Schema section, it only appears in Catalog section of tables.

There are two other pairs of tables as well: Property/property, PropertyClass/propertyclass. No other tables have duplicates. Users and PropertyClasses have a join table UserPropertyClasses.

Any idea why this might be happening or how to prevent it?

Sequelize version: Sequelize CLI [Node: 10.7.0, CLI: 5.4.0, ORM: 4.42.0]

MySql Server version: 8.0.13

MySql Workbench version is also: 8.0.13

Here is Address model:

'use strict';
module.exports = (sequelize, DataTypes) => {
  const Address = sequelize.define('Address', {
    userId: {
      type: DataTypes.INTEGER,
      validate: {
        notNull: true
      }
    },
    street1: {
      type: DataTypes.STRING,
      validate: {
        notEmpty: true
      }
    }
  }, {
    paranoid: true
  });

  Address.associate = function(models) {
    Address.belongsTo(models.User, {
      as: 'user',
      foreignKey: 'userId'
    })
  }
  return Address;
};

Here is Addresses migration:

'use strict';
module.exports = {
  up: (queryInterface, Sequelize) => {
    return queryInterface.createTable('Addresses', {
      id: {
        allowNull: false,
        autoIncrement: true,
        primaryKey: true,
        type: Sequelize.INTEGER
      },
      userId: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.INTEGER,
        references: {
          model: 'Users',
          key: 'id'
        }
      },
      street1: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.STRING(50)
      },
      createdAt: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      },
      updatedAt: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      },
      deletedAt: {
        allowNull: true,
        defaultValue: null,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      }
    })
    .then(async () => {
      return await Promise.all([
        queryInterface.addIndex('Addresses', [ 'userId' ]),
      ])
    });
  }

User model:

'use strict';
module.exports = (sequelize, DataTypes) => {
  const User = sequelize.define('User', {
    firstname: {
      type: DataTypes.STRING,
      validate: {
        notEmpty: true
      }
    }
  }, {
    paranoid: true
  });

  User.associate = function(models) {
    User.hasOne(models.Address, {
      as: 'address',
      foreignKey: 'userId'
    })
  };

  return User;
};

Here is the User migration:

'use strict';
module.exports = {
  up: (queryInterface, Sequelize) => {
    return queryInterface.createTable('Users', {
      id: {
        allowNull: false,
        autoIncrement: true,
        primaryKey: true,
        type: Sequelize.INTEGER
      },
      firstname: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.STRING(50)
      },
      createdAt: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      },
      updatedAt: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      },
      deletedAt: {
        allowNull: true,
        defaultValue: null,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      }
    })
    .then(async () => {
      return await Promise.all([
        queryInterface.addIndex('Users', [ 'firstname' ]),
      ]);
    })
  }
  • I think you need to define the references (constraints) in the migration as well if you are using migrations, are you using migrations ? – Mohdule Dec 29 '18 at 18:19
  • Reference is in migration. I'll update question – user1192805 Dec 29 '18 at 18:48
  • Awesome, you see creating the table and the constraint is handled by your migration the model is just the interface to get that data, this is weird though, your migration and references clause is correct, maybe you forgot to define an id on the Users table or something ? Can you maybe post the full Users migration and full Addresses migration here – Mohdule Dec 29 '18 at 19:25
  • Updated to include full models and migrations – user1192805 Dec 29 '18 at 20:50
0

Posting here what I discovered if it helps others.

Mysql docs state that table names should be lowercase when using InnoDB.

If you are using InnoDB tables, you should set this variable to 1 on all platforms to force names to be converted to lowercase.

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/server-system-variables.html#sysvar_lower_case_table_names

Here are changes made to eliminate extra table creation and render the diagram with relationship connections:

  • Table names snake case plural
  • Table column names and their references snake case singular
  • Model and name PascalCase singular
  • Model attribute names camelCase with 'field' snake case singular
  • Model created with option 'tableName' snake case plural
  • Model created with option 'underscored' true
  • Model association with 'as' alias and 'foreignKey' snake case

Migration example:

'use strict';
module.exports = {
  up: (queryInterface, Sequelize) => {
    return queryInterface.createTable('addresses', {
      id: {
        allowNull: false,
        autoIncrement: true,
        primaryKey: true,
        type: Sequelize.INTEGER
      },
      user_id: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.INTEGER,
        references: {
          model: 'users',
          key: 'id'
        }
      },
      street1: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.STRING(50)
      }
      created_at: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      },
      updated_at: {
        allowNull: false,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      },
      deleted_at: {
        allowNull: true,
        defaultValue: null,
        type: Sequelize.DATE
      }
    })
  },
  down: (queryInterface, Sequelize) => {
    return queryInterface.dropTable('addresses');
  }
};

Model example:

'use strict';
module.exports = (sequelize, DataTypes) => {
  const Address = sequelize.define('Address', {
    userId: {
      type: DataTypes.INTEGER,
      field: 'user_id',
      allowNull: false,
      validate: {
        notNull(value) {
          if (value == null) {
            throw new Error('Missing user id')
          }
        }
      }
    },
    street1: {
      type: DataTypes.STRING,
      field: 'street1',
      validate: {
        notEmpty: true
      }
    }
  }, {
    tableName: 'addresses',
    paranoid: true,
    underscored: true
  });

  Address.associate = function(models) {

    Address.belongsTo(models.User, {
     as: 'user',
     foreignKey: 'user_id'
    })
  }

  return Address;
};

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