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I've gone through the official doc. I'm having a hard time understanding what this function is used for and how it works. Can someone explain this in layman's terms?

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4 Answers 4

72

unfold imagines a tensor as a longer tensor with repeated columns/rows of values 'folded' on top of each other, which is then "unfolded":

  • size determines how large the folds are
  • step determines how often it is folded

E.g. for a 2x5 tensor, unfolding it with step=1, and patch size=2 across dim=1:

x = torch.tensor([[1,2,3,4,5],
                  [6,7,8,9,10]])
>>> x.unfold(1,2,1)
tensor([[[ 1,  2], [ 2,  3], [ 3,  4], [ 4,  5]],
        [[ 6,  7], [ 7,  8], [ 8,  9], [ 9, 10]]])

enter image description here

fold is roughly the opposite of this operation, but "overlapping" values are summed in the output.

2
  • 10
    Your drawing made the penny drop for me! Thank you!
    – Ophir S
    Apr 30, 2021 at 14:48
  • 2
    An important point about "fold" and "unfold" is that the memory isn't copied. This makes them very fast. But also note that if you change the "2" entry in your unfolded array, both 2s will change, and so will the original 2 in x. May 27, 2022 at 0:04
36

The unfold and fold are used to facilitate "sliding window" operations (like convolutions). Suppose you want to apply a function foo to every 5x5 window in a feature map/image:

from torch.nn import functional as f
windows = f.unfold(x, kernel_size=5)

Now windows has size of batch-(55x.size(1))-num_windows, you can apply foo on windows:

processed = foo(windows)

Now you need to "fold" processed back to the original size of x:

out = f.fold(processed, x.shape[-2:], kernel_size=5)

You need to take care of padding, and kernel_size that may affect your ability to "fold" back processed to the size of x. Moreover, fold sums over overlapping elements, so you might want to divide the output of fold by patch size.


Please note that torch.unfold performs a different operation than nn.Unfold. See this thread for details.

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26

One dimensional unfolding is easy:

x = torch.arange(1, 9).float()
print(x)
# dimension, size, step
print(x.unfold(0, 2, 1))
print(x.unfold(0, 3, 2))

Out:

tensor([1., 2., 3., 4., 5., 6., 7., 8.])
tensor([[1., 2.],
        [2., 3.],
        [3., 4.],
        [4., 5.],
        [5., 6.],
        [6., 7.],
        [7., 8.]])
tensor([[1., 2., 3.],
        [3., 4., 5.],
        [5., 6., 7.]])

Two dimensional unfolding (also called patching)

import torch
patch=(3,3)
x=torch.arange(16).float()
print(x, x.shape)
x2d = x.reshape(1,1,4,4)
print(x2d, x2d.shape)
h,w = patch
c=x2d.size(1)
print(c) # channels
# unfold(dimension, size, step)
r = x2d.unfold(2,h,1).unfold(3,w,1).transpose(1,3).reshape(-1, c, h, w)
print(r.shape)
print(r) # result
tensor([ 0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  4.,  5.,  6.,  7.,  8.,  9., 10., 11., 12., 13.,
        14., 15.]) torch.Size([16])
tensor([[[[ 0.,  1.,  2.,  3.],
          [ 4.,  5.,  6.,  7.],
          [ 8.,  9., 10., 11.],
          [12., 13., 14., 15.]]]]) torch.Size([1, 1, 4, 4])
1
torch.Size([4, 1, 3, 3])

tensor([[[[ 0.,  1.,  2.],
          [ 4.,  5.,  6.],
          [ 8.,  9., 10.]]],


        [[[ 4.,  5.,  6.],
          [ 8.,  9., 10.],
          [12., 13., 14.]]],


        [[[ 1.,  2.,  3.],
          [ 5.,  6.,  7.],
          [ 9., 10., 11.]]],


        [[[ 5.,  6.,  7.],
          [ 9., 10., 11.],
          [13., 14., 15.]]]])

patching

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  • 3
    Can you add the corresponding .fold operations to return to the original tensor?
    – Gilfoyle
    Mar 1, 2021 at 21:05
  • Check the fold example
    – prosti
    Mar 8, 2021 at 21:34
  • Wouldn't it be possible to get the same result with a single F.unfold() call by doing something like F.unfold(input=x2d, kernel_size=(3, 3), dilation=(1, 1), stride=(1, 1), padding=(0, 0)?
    – Gilfoyle
    Mar 22, 2021 at 18:46
1

Since there are no answers with 4-D tensors and nn.functional.unfold() only accepts 4-D tensor, I will would to explain this.

Assuming the input tensor is of shape (batch_size, channels, height, width), and I have taken an example where batch_size = 1, channels = 2, height = 3, width = 3.

enter image description here

kernel_size = 2 which is nothing but a 2x2 kernel

enter image description here

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