0
#include<iostream.h>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
      float x=1.1;
      if(x==1.1)
         cout<<"yes";
      else
         cout<<"no";
      return 0;
}

I assign value 1.1 to x and checked value of x is 1.1 or not?

18
  • 2
    <iostream.h> -- What compiler are you using? The standard header is <iostream>, not <iostream.h>, and it has been standard for 20 years now. Dec 30 '18 at 4:10
  • 1
    @SidS - Hmmm, checking it carefully, I guess I agree. It also covers things at a level that I don't think the OP is prepared to deal with. Dec 30 '18 at 4:31
  • 1
    I posted more information in the duplicate answer, this is 100% a duplicate question. The fraction matters, combine Omnifarious and SidS's answers in this question. You should never ever do an equals comparison in float certainly for formats that can have the same value with two different bit patterns as the equals is a bit pattern comparison. In this case the values 1.1 or 0.7 cannot be completely and accurately represented in IEEE 754 single precision floating point format so jumping between double to single to double as in the question results in a bit pattern that doesnt match.
    – old_timer
    Dec 30 '18 at 8:55
  • 1
    Now if there is an issue with the language of the questions float literal or whatever, then just edit the question...There is no way that these two can be considered different questions. the equals failed because is the question and the reason is the same...
    – old_timer
    Dec 30 '18 at 8:58
  • 1
    @old_timer: Testing for floating-point comparison is not bit-pattern comparison. The different bit patterns for −0 and +0 compare as equal, while the same bit pattern for two instances of a NaN compares as not equal. Dec 30 '18 at 9:51
4

You've wandered into an interesting area of almost all programming languages. Floating point values are tricky things, and testing them for equality is very rarely recommended. The basic problem is that floating point values on modern computers are represented as binary decimals with a finite number of digits of precision.

To make this simpler to understand, lets work with base 10 decimals and use a number that can't be accurately represented using them. Take 1/3. If you are representing it as a base 10 decimal you get this:

0.̅3 (there is a bar over the three if it isn't showing up properly). Basically, it goes on forever, there is no finite number of digits that can represent 1/3 as a base ten decimal with perfect accuracy. So, if you only have so many digits, you chop it off and approximate:

0.333333

That's actually 333333/1000000, which is really close to 1/3, but not quite.

C++ has a few different floating point types. And these types usually (it depends on the platform the program is being compiled for) have different numbers of significant digits. By default, a floating point constant is of type double which usually has more digits than a float (and it never has less). Again, using base 10 as an example, since you were storing your value in a float you were doing something like this:

0.333333 == 0.3333333333333333333

which of course is false.

If you wrote your code this way:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
      float x = 1.1f;
      if(x == 1.1f)
         cout<<"yes";
      else
         cout<<"no";
      return 0;
}

you would likely get the expected result. Putting an f at the end of a bare floating point value (aka, a floating point literal) tells C++ that it's of type float.

This is all very fascinating of course, and there's a lot to get into. If you would like to learn a lot more about how floating point numbers are really represented, there is a nice Wikipedia page on IEEE 754 floating point representation, which is how most modern processors represent floating point numbers nowadays.

From a practical standpoint, you should rarely (if ever) compare floating point numbers for equality. Usually, a desire to do so indicates some sort of design flaw in your program. And if you really must than use an 'epsilon' comparison. Basically, test to see if your number is 'close enough', though determining what that means in any given situation isn't necessarily a trivial task, which is why it usually represents a design flaw if you need to compare them for equality at all. But, in your case, it could look like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
      float x=1.1;
      if (fabs(x - 1.1) < 0.000001)
         cout<<"yes";
      else
         cout<<"no";
      return 0;
}
2
  • 3
    Please do not generally recommend using an “epsilon” comparison. There are few situations where it is a proper solution. See 1 and 2, among other answers, for reasons it is often not a proper solution. Often, better advice for somebody attempting to compare floating-point results for equality is to reconsider their software design. Your phrase “whatever that means” is a big clue that correct meaning is absent. Dec 30 '18 at 10:17
  • @EricPostpischil - You're right. I was very consciously trying to keep this answer to being one that even a beginner could understand, since it seemed like it was a beginner who was asking the question. Dec 30 '18 at 22:32
3

The reason the compare fails is that you're comparing a double value to a float variable.

Some compilers will issue a warning when you assign a double value to a float variable.

To get the desired output, you could try this:

double x = 1.1;
if (x == 1.1)

or this:

float x = 1.1f;
if (x == 1.1f)
10
  • 1
    A better answer is to tell the OP to just not ever compare for equality when using floating point numbers. I mean, what you suggest will almost certainly work, but it's very specific to this situation. Dec 30 '18 at 4:25
  • 1
    1.1 is a double, 1.1f is a float
    – Sid S
    Dec 30 '18 at 4:27
  • 1
    You should almost never compare floating point using ==
    – Slava
    Dec 30 '18 at 5:13
  • 1
    @Slava, I pointed out how to get == to work, as he asked why == didn't work. "You shouldn't use ==" is not a good answer to why == doesn't work.
    – Sid S
    Dec 30 '18 at 6:07
  • 2
    @Omnifarious, Sometimes, simply giving a person a direct and simple answer to their question is all it takes for them to understand the problem they were facing.
    – Sid S
    Dec 30 '18 at 6:12

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