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Qt documentation says the following about QtConcurrent::blockingMap:

Note: This function will block until all items in the sequence have been processed.

Documentation for QtConcurrent::map is otherwise identical. Also it returns QFuture<void> instead of void.

Documentation for QFuture has the following remark:

The waitForFinished() function causes the calling thread to block and wait for the computation to finish, ensuring that all results are available.

Thus, I expected that QtConcurrent::blockingMap(seq, f) is identical to QtConcurrent::map(seq, f).waitForFinished(). However, it isn't.

#include <QObject>
#include <QtConcurrent>

class Foo : public QObject {
Q_OBJECT
public:
    explicit Foo(QObject *parent = nullptr) : QObject(parent) {
        connect(this, &Foo::signal, this, &Foo::slot, Qt::AutoConnection);
    }

    void startMapWithWaiting() {
        qDebug("startMapWithWaiting");
        slot_counter = 0;
        std::atomic_int signal_counter = 0;
        QtConcurrent::map(nums, [&](auto &&num) {
            ++signal_counter;
            emit signal();
        }).waitForFinished();
        qDebug("result: %d signals, %d slots", int(signal_counter), int(slot_counter));
        slot_counter = 0;
    }

    void startBlockingMap() {
        qDebug("startBlockingMap");
        slot_counter = 0;
        std::atomic_int signal_counter = 0;
        QtConcurrent::blockingMap(nums, [&](auto &&num) {
            ++signal_counter;
            emit signal();
        });
        qDebug("result: %d signals, %d slots", int(signal_counter), int(slot_counter));
        slot_counter = 0;
    }

public slots:
    void slot() { ++slot_counter; }

signals:

    void signal();

private:
    std::atomic_int slot_counter = 0;
    std::vector<int> nums{1, 2, 5, 8};
};

#include "main.moc"

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    QCoreApplication app(argc, argv);
    Foo *foo = new Foo(&app);
    QTimer::singleShot(10, foo, [foo, &app]() {
        foo->startMapWithWaiting();
        foo->startBlockingMap();
        app.quit();
    });
    return app.exec();
}

Output is

startMapWithWaiting
result: 4 signals, 4 slots
startBlockingMap
result: 4 signals, x slots

Where x varies from 0 to 4 depending on… something. Which is confusing.

I wonder what's the difference between the two ways and how I misread documentation.

2

Your both methods work the same way: all lambda functions were terminated with 4 signals emitted. The difference of slots called in the example depends on how emit signal() works. As the program used Qt::AutoConnection for signal/slot:

  • If the destination thread (the main thread where Foo was created) is not the same with the current thread (pool thread, controlled by the global ThreadPool), the event will be put in the event queue, otherwise, the slot will be executed directly (as the same as Qt::DirectConnection).

One can get different results (x slots) with the same example shown. It depends on how the global thread pool manages its threads. In my configuration, the output is :

    startMapWithWaiting
    result : 4 signals, 0 slots
    startBlockingMap
    result : 4 signals, 4 slots

To have the same results, we can use Qt::DirectConnection instead of Qt::AutoConnection or adjust QApplication::processEvent() before printing the result :

    QApplication::processEvents(); //<-- force slot() to be processed.
    qDebug("result blocking : %d signals, %d slots", int(signal_counter), int(slot_counter));
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  • Thank you for response, but while your answer does provide assistance in understanding the issue, it doesn't quite answer why behaviour is different. – grepcake Jan 1 '19 at 9:43
1

blockingMap provides guarantee that nothing else is going to be executed in the main thread (where application 'lives'). Thus, it might use the main thread along with the pooled, while QtConcurrent::map can't execute lambda in the main thread. That's what causes different results. Actually, x is the number of times lambda is executed in the main thread. Here's why:

Qt::AutoConnection calls signals immediately when receiver lives in the same thread that have emitted the signal (in my case, in the main thread), so slot_counter is updated. When receiver lives in another thread, calling slot is queued and will be processed when startBlockingMap or startMapWithWaiting are finished. To process them immediately, one might call qApp->processEvents() as tungit suggests.

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