63

What is a good way to always do integer division in Perl?

For example, I want:

real / int = int

int / real = int

int / int = int

7 Answers 7

90

There are at least 2 reasonable answers to this question. (I originally gave only answer 2.)

  1. Use the int() function to truncate the floating-point calculation result to an integer (throwing away the decimal part), as Bryan suggested in his self-answer: #539805

  2. Use the use integer pragma to make Perl truncate both the inputs and results of calculations to integers. It's scoped to within { } blocks.

Examples:

print 3.0/2.1 . "\n";      # => 1.42857142857143
print 5.0/1.5 . "\n";      # => 3.33333333333333

print int(3.0/2.1) . "\n"; # => 1
print int(5.0/1.5) . "\n"; # => 3

{
  use integer;
  print 3.0/2.1 . "\n";    # => 1
  print 5.0/1.5 . "\n";    # => 5 (because 1.5 was truncated to 1)
}
print 3.0/2.1 . "\n";      # => 1.42857142857143 again
6
  • 1
    Additional info, parentheses separate 'use integer' inside block, then outside the block, will be used standard real calculation both before and after block.
    – Znik
    Feb 22, 2018 at 13:09
  • Without using 'use integer' you can always write -1 & $x which returns the integer value of $x ... Jun 15, 2020 at 21:42
  • @johannesvalks That will turn negative integers into positive twos-complement numbers, which is probably not what you wanted. 'use integer' is also problematic, as it is signed integers, so will completely screw up large unsigned numbers. use integer also has implementation defined behavior with negative inputs on C89 compilers. Casting via int(a/b) is going to be wrong for most large inputs. Getting consistent results for all inputs is really hard.
    – DanaJ
    Feb 21, 2021 at 5:06
  • You are changing the definition of "integer division" in the entire history of modern computing and perhaps mathematics! See the link for what integer division actually is. Your method yields 5 for 5/1.5, while integer division yields 3. ibm.com/docs/en/zvse/6.2?topic=SSB27H_6.2.0/…
    – FNia
    Feb 16 at 4:14
  • Fair point @FNia, although that meaning was Perl's choice, not mine. I revised my answer. Feb 17 at 0:19
50

You can cast ints in Perl:

int(5/1.5) = 3;
7
  • 8
    Yes, but integer division would be int(5) / int(1.5). Otherwise, you're just rounding the real division.
    – Rog
    Feb 12, 2009 at 2:56
  • 6
    but int(5) / int(1.5) != int
    – Learning
    Feb 12, 2009 at 2:59
  • 5
    Sorry, this is what I was really asking for. I was wanting an int result after doing any sort of division. So yes, I was looking for rounding. Feb 12, 2009 at 16:06
  • 3
    Beware floating point rounding problems: int(-6.725/0.025) is -268 and POSIX::floor(-6.725/0.025) is -269 see perldoc
    – maxpolk
    Apr 22, 2016 at 18:36
  • 5
    It is completly wrong, because with intiger division we completly drop all numbers after dot. then with int math 5/1.5 is 5/1 eq 5 not 3 as in this example. Also it is wrong when we round up/down numbers, then 5/1.5 is 5/2 eq 2.5=>3, but it equals witn int(5/1.5) by accident. it is not rule.
    – Znik
    Feb 22, 2017 at 8:38
8

int(x+.5) will round positive values toward the nearest integer. Rounding up is harder.

To round toward zero:

int($x)

For the solutions below, include the following statement:

use POSIX;

To round down: POSIX::floor($x)

To round up: POSIX::ceil($x)

To round away from zero: POSIX::floor($x) - int($x) + POSIX::ceil($x)

To round off to the nearest integer: POSIX::floor($x+.5)

Note that int($x+.5) fails badly for negative values. int(-2.1+.5) is int(-1.6), which is -1.

2
  • 4
    No, int rounds toward zero, while normal rounding it toward even. Run perl -le 'printf "int(%s) is %d, round(%s) is %.0f;\n", ($_+0.5)x4 for -10..10' and you will see things like int(-3.5) is -3, round(-3.5) is -4; int(-2.5) is -2, round(-2.5) is -2; int(-1.5) is -1, round(-1.5) is -2; int(-0.5) is 0, round(-0.5) is -0; int(0.5) is 0, round(0.5) is 0; int(1.5) is 1, round(1.5) is 2; int(2.5) is 2, round(2.5) is 2; int(3.5) is 3, round(3.5) is 4; int(4.5) is 4, round(4.5) is 4;
    – tchrist
    May 5, 2011 at 2:17
  • @tchrist Actually, normal rounding is towards nearest; only the border case .5 rounds towards even.
    – fishinear
    Aug 9, 2017 at 13:18
4

you can:

use integer;

it is explained by Michael Ratanapintha or else use manually:

$a=3.7;
$b=2.1;

$c=int(int($a)/int($b));

notice, 'int' is not casting. this is function for converting number to integer form. this is because Perl 5 does not have separate integer division. exception is when you 'use integer'. Then you will lose real division.

0

Hope it works

int(9/4) = 2.

Thanks Manojkumar

0

Integer division $x divided by $y ...

$z = -1 & $x / $y

How does it work?

$x / $y

return the floating point division

&

perform a bit-wise AND

-1

stands for

&HFFFFFFFF

for the largest integer ... whence

$z = -1 & $x / $y

gives the integer division ...

1
  • perl -E 'my($x,$y)=(-12,4); my $z = -1 & $x/$y; say int($x/$y); say $x/$y; say $z;' will give: -3, -3, 18446744073709551613.
    – DanaJ
    Feb 21, 2021 at 5:12
-2

Eg 9 / 4 = 2.25

int(9) / int(4) = 2

9 / 4 - remainder / deniminator = 2

9 /4 - 9 % 4 / 4 = 2

2
  • 6
    This answer is completely wrong. "int(9)/ int(4) == 2.25", so I think Paul meant int(9/4) Jun 14, 2013 at 12:59
  • I think he didn't test his examples
    – Znik
    Jan 17, 2014 at 13:45

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