What is a good way to always do integer division in Perl?

For example, I want:

real / int = int

int / real = int

int / int = int

The lexically scoped integer pragma forces Perl to use integer arithmetic in its scope:

print 3.0/2.1 . "\n";    # => 1.42857142857143
{
  use integer;
  print 3.0/2.1 . "\n";  # => 1
}
print 3.0/2.1 . "\n";    # => 1.42857142857143
  • Additional info, parentheses separate 'use integer' inside block, then outside the block, will be used standard real calculation both before and after block. – Znik Feb 22 at 13:09
up vote 39 down vote accepted

You can cast ints in Perl:

int(5/1.5) = 3;
  • 5
    Yes, but integer division would be int(5) / int(1.5). Otherwise, you're just rounding the real division. – Rog Feb 12 '09 at 2:56
  • 5
    but int(5) / int(1.5) != int – Learning Feb 12 '09 at 2:59
  • 2
    Sorry, this is what I was really asking for. I was wanting an int result after doing any sort of division. So yes, I was looking for rounding. – Bryan Denny Feb 12 '09 at 16:06
  • 1
    Beware floating point rounding problems: int(-6.725/0.025) is -268 and POSIX::floor(-6.725/0.025) is -269 see perldoc – maxpolk Apr 22 '16 at 18:36
  • 3
    It is completly wrong, because with intiger division we completly drop all numbers after dot. then with int math 5/1.5 is 5/1 eq 5 not 3 as in this example. Also it is wrong when we round up/down numbers, then 5/1.5 is 5/2 eq 2.5=>3, but it equals witn int(5/1.5) by accident. it is not rule. – Znik Feb 22 '17 at 8:38

int(x+.5) will round positive values toward the nearest integer. Rounding up is harder.

To round toward zero:

int($x)

For the solutions below, include the following statement:

use POSIX;

To round down: POSIX::floor($x)

To round up: POSIX::ceil($x)

To round away from zero: POSIX::floor($x) - int($x) + POSIX::ceil($x)

To round off to the nearest integer: POSIX::floor($x+.5)

Note that int($x+.5) fails badly for negative values. int(-2.1+.5) is int(-1.6), which is -1.

  • 4
    No, int rounds toward zero, while normal rounding it toward even. Run perl -le 'printf "int(%s) is %d, round(%s) is %.0f;\n", ($_+0.5)x4 for -10..10' and you will see things like int(-3.5) is -3, round(-3.5) is -4; int(-2.5) is -2, round(-2.5) is -2; int(-1.5) is -1, round(-1.5) is -2; int(-0.5) is 0, round(-0.5) is -0; int(0.5) is 0, round(0.5) is 0; int(1.5) is 1, round(1.5) is 2; int(2.5) is 2, round(2.5) is 2; int(3.5) is 3, round(3.5) is 4; int(4.5) is 4, round(4.5) is 4; – tchrist May 5 '11 at 2:17
  • @tchrist Actually, normal rounding is towards nearest; only the border case .5 rounds towards even. – fishinear Aug 9 '17 at 13:18

you can:

use integer;

it is explained by Michael Ratanapintha or else use manually:

$a=3.7;
$b=2.1;

$c=int(int($a)/int($b));

notice, 'int' is not casting. this is function for converting number to integer form. this is because Perl 5 does not have separate integer division. exception is when you 'use integer'. Then you will lose real division.

Hope it works

int(9/4) = 2.

Thanks Manojkumar

Eg 9 / 4 = 2.25

int(9) / int(4) = 2

9 / 4 - remainder / deniminator = 2

9 /4 - 9 % 4 / 4 = 2

  • 3
    This answer is completely wrong. "int(9)/ int(4) == 2.25", so I think Paul meant int(9/4) – Christopher Causer Jun 14 '13 at 12:59
  • I think he didn't test his examples – Znik Jan 17 '14 at 13:45

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