6

Sometimes I have a long list and I would like to check whether a string matches anything in the list. I am trying to interpolate a junction inside a regex. They are all errors.

say "12345" ~~ m/ <{ (2,3,4).any }> /
Cannot resolve caller MAKE_REGEX(Int, Bool, Bool, Int, PseudoStash); none of these signatures match:

say "12345" ~~ m/ $( (2,3,4).any ) /
This type cannot unbox to a native string: P6opaque, Junction

Does this error message mean that junctions cannot be used inside regex interpolation?

The work-around I have is

say "12345" ~~ m/ <{ (2,3,4).join("||") }> /
「2」

Any suggestions as to use junctions inside regex interpolation?

Thank you very much !!!

lisprog

  • It seems the first case compiles if you put a so in front of the junction: say "12345" ~~ m/ <{ so (2,3,4).any }> / (but I don't think this solves the problem though) – Håkon Hægland Jan 1 at 0:50
  • 1
    Thank you Hakon Haegland for your help and Happy New Year to you !!! – lisprogtor Jan 1 at 6:52
7

Sometimes I have a long list and I would like to check whether a string matches anything in the list.

Use a list, not a Junction:

my @list = <bar bartoo baragain>;
say 'bartoo' ~~ / @list /;                         # 「bartoo」
say 'bartoo' ~~ / <{<bar bartoo baragain>}> /;     # 「bartoo」

Note that by default you get the longest matching token.

I am trying to interpolate a junction inside a regex. They are all errors. ... Does this error message mean that junctions cannot be used inside regex interpolation?

I think so. (The error message is perhaps LTA.) Junctions are a feature of the main P6 language. It seems reasonable that the pattern matching DSL doesn't support them.

The work-around I have is

say "12345" ~~ m/ <{ (2,3,4).join("||") }> /
「2」

If you join with a doubled pipe (||) then you get the first token that matches rather than the longest:

say 'bartoo' ~~ / <{'bar || bartoo || baragain'}> /; # 「bar」
say 'bartoo' ~~ / ||@list /;                         # 「bar」
say 'bartoo' ~~ / ||<{<bar bartoo baragain>}> /;     # 「bar」

Not specifying the pipe symbol for these constructs is the same as specifying a single pipe symbol (|) and matches the longest matching token:

say 'bartoo' ~~ / <{'bar | bartoo | baragain'}> /; # 「bartoo」
say 'bartoo' ~~ / |@list /;                        # 「bartoo」
say 'bartoo' ~~ / |<{<bar bartoo baragain>}> /;    # 「bartoo」

You've asked related questions before. I'll add links to a couple of them here for convenience:

  • 2
    Thank you very much again, raiph !!! Happy New Year to you !!! – lisprogtor Jan 1 at 6:53

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.