47

I am having some difficulty with these two functions: byteArrayToInt and intToByteArray.

The problem is that if I use one to get to another and that result to get to the former, the results are different, as you can see from my examples below.

I cannot find the bug in the code. Any ideas are very welcome. Thanks.

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int a = 123;
    byte[] aBytes = intToByteArray(a);
    int a2 = byteArrayToInt(aBytes);

    System.out.println(a);         // prints '123'
    System.out.println(aBytes);    // prints '[B@459189e1'
    System.out.println(a2);        // prints '2063597568
            System.out.println(intToByteArray(a2));  // prints '[B@459189e1'
}

public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) 
{
    int value = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        int shift = (4 - 1 - i) * 8;
        value += (b[i] & 0x000000FF) << shift;
    }
    return value;
}

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int a)
{
    byte[] ret = new byte[4];
    ret[0] = (byte) (a & 0xFF);   
    ret[1] = (byte) ((a >> 8) & 0xFF);   
    ret[2] = (byte) ((a >> 16) & 0xFF);   
    ret[3] = (byte) ((a >> 24) & 0xFF);
    return ret;
}
1
  • Try removing the loop in byteArrayToInt.
    – user499054
    Commented Mar 23, 2011 at 1:18

10 Answers 10

60

Your methods should be (something like)

public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) 
{
    return   b[3] & 0xFF |
            (b[2] & 0xFF) << 8 |
            (b[1] & 0xFF) << 16 |
            (b[0] & 0xFF) << 24;
}

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int a)
{
    return new byte[] {
        (byte) ((a >> 24) & 0xFF),
        (byte) ((a >> 16) & 0xFF),   
        (byte) ((a >> 8) & 0xFF),   
        (byte) (a & 0xFF)
    };
}

These methods were tested with the following code :

Random rand = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis());
byte[] b;
int a, v;
for (int i=0; i<10000000; i++) {
    a = rand.nextInt();
    b = intToByteArray(a);
    v = byteArrayToInt(b);
    if (a != v) {
        System.out.println("ERR! " + a + " != " + Arrays.toString(b) + " != " + v);
    }
}
System.out.println("Done!");
9
  • @owlstead, yes, your code would work best to convert a byte[] into int[], however for isolated conversion of byte to int, using direct bit manipulation (especially when you know and expect the defined data to be properly formed) is a way lot faster than creating an instance of a class to do the exact same thing for each call. Even if you cache an instance of ByteBuffer, you'd still have to copy the passing bytes to the buffer's array, thus gives you some overhead in any case. Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 17:25
  • 1
    @owlstead, perhaps, but if you can optimize a method from the start, and it is a really simple one, why would you settle for less? You don't need a reusable pattern here.. and, besides, the accumulation of "small price to pay" can escalate quite fast in a big project. Think about it. Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 17:37
  • yes, this answer is a tidy old. I don't know why I used a for block for the first method... Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 19:24
  • 2
    I'm a bit confused. In the intToByteArray method, why do you have to AND 0xFF to each byte before converting it back to a byte? 0xFF would include all 8 bits. And a byte is only 8 bits. So the code ` & 0xFF` seems pointless.
    – Kayla
    Commented Feb 27, 2014 at 20:57
  • 3
    @WaffleStealer654: That's needed because Java bytes are signed, so if the top bit is on it's a negative number with one bits in all the high-order bits when converted to an int. (The fact that Java bytes are signed is, well, to be polite, non-optimal in my opinion, but that's the way they are.)
    – RenniePet
    Commented Feb 24, 2015 at 14:39
50

That's a lot of work for:

public static int byteArrayToLeInt(byte[] b) {
    final ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(b);
    bb.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);
    return bb.getInt();
}

public static byte[] leIntToByteArray(int i) {
    final ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE);
    bb.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);
    bb.putInt(i);
    return bb.array();
}

This method uses the Java ByteBuffer and ByteOrder functionality in the java.nio package. This code should be preferred where readability is required. It should also be very easy to remember.

I've shown Little Endian byte order here. To create a Big Endian version you can simply leave out the call to order(ByteOrder).


In code where performance is higher priority than readability (about 10x as fast):

public static int byteArrayToLeInt(byte[] encodedValue) {
    int value = (encodedValue[3] << (Byte.SIZE * 3));
    value |= (encodedValue[2] & 0xFF) << (Byte.SIZE * 2);
    value |= (encodedValue[1] & 0xFF) << (Byte.SIZE * 1);
    value |= (encodedValue[0] & 0xFF);
    return value;
}

public static byte[] leIntToByteArray(int value) {
    byte[] encodedValue = new byte[Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE];
    encodedValue[3] = (byte) (value >> Byte.SIZE * 3);
    encodedValue[2] = (byte) (value >> Byte.SIZE * 2);   
    encodedValue[1] = (byte) (value >> Byte.SIZE);   
    encodedValue[0] = (byte) value;
    return encodedValue;
}

Just reverse the byte array index to count from zero to three to create a Big Endian version of this code.


Notes:

  • In Java 8 you can also make use of the Integer.BYTES constant, which is more succinct than Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE.
7
  • 2
    One liner: byte[] result = ByteBuffer.allocate(Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE).order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN).putInt(i).array(); Commented Jul 10, 2012 at 18:57
  • OK, so there was an interesting discussion with Yanick about performance, so I've added a performance enhanced version, using Yanick's answer (upvoted) as base. The most important change is the removal of the for loop of course, as branching is slow on current CPU's. It's therefore at least twice as fast. Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 18:07
  • Isn't there an inconsistency between your short version and your performance version? The sort version is for little-endian and the performance version is for big-endian?
    – RenniePet
    Commented Jul 27, 2013 at 10:41
  • @RenniePet Ah, yeah, should have made that more clear. I'll add a LE version of the performance version later. Commented Jul 27, 2013 at 10:58
  • From the performance version of byteArrayToLeInt, why didn't you AND the encodedValue[3] by 0xff?
    – mr5
    Commented Aug 1, 2015 at 6:14
44

You're swapping endianness between your two methods. You have intToByteArray(int a) assigning the low-order bits into ret[0], but then byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) assigns b[0] to the high-order bits of the result. You need to invert one or the other, like:

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int a)
{
    byte[] ret = new byte[4];
    ret[3] = (byte) (a & 0xFF);   
    ret[2] = (byte) ((a >> 8) & 0xFF);   
    ret[1] = (byte) ((a >> 16) & 0xFF);   
    ret[0] = (byte) ((a >> 24) & 0xFF);
    return ret;
}
1
  • 4
    Take a look at the ByteBuffer class, I've created an example around it. Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 0:30
24

You can also use BigInteger for variable length bytes. You can convert it to Long, Integer or Short, whichever suits your needs.

new BigInteger(bytes).intValue();

or to denote polarity:

new BigInteger(1, bytes).intValue();

To get bytes back just:

new BigInteger(bytes).toByteArray()
4
  • @Duffmaster33 Simple, but slow... and too much garbage collection pressure. But +1 anyway :)
    – St.Antario
    Commented Oct 30, 2017 at 15:06
  • @St.Antario Thanks for the comment, would you mind elaborating? I'm curious Commented Oct 31, 2017 at 14:30
  • 1
    @Duffmaster33 This can be seen if we run simple JMH-benchmark. I ran it with -prof gc and saw that with default parameters on a single fork 5 warmup and 5 iterations I got 16 Minor GC with allocation rate 500 MB/sec. On my machine it's about 10 times slower.
    – St.Antario
    Commented Oct 31, 2017 at 14:51
  • @Duffmaster33 I just decompiled the version with bitwise operations and noticed that all these movsbl 0x13(%r11),%r10d movsbl 0x11(%r11),%eax movsbl 0x12(%r11),%r8d movzbl 0x10(%r11),%r9d And these all or-ed.
    – St.Antario
    Commented Oct 31, 2017 at 14:59
2

I like owlstead's original answer, and if you don't like the idea of creating a ByteBuffer on every method call then you can reuse the ByteBuffer by calling it's .clear() and .flip() methods:

ByteBuffer _intShifter = ByteBuffer.allocate(Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE)
                                   .order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);

public byte[] intToByte(int value) {
    _intShifter.clear();
    _intShifter.putInt(value);      
    return _intShifter.array();
}

public int byteToInt(byte[] data)
{
    _intShifter.clear();
    _intShifter.put(data, 0, Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE);
    _intShifter.flip();
    return _intShifter.getInt();
}
1
  • 1
    Yup, just don't re-use the buffer in multi-threaded code, that would get you in trouble. Commented Feb 1, 2015 at 22:22
2

I found a simple way in com.google.common.primitives which is in the [Maven:com.google.guava:guava:12.0.1]

long newLong = Longs.fromByteArray(oldLongByteArray);
int newInt = Ints.fromByteArray(oldIntByteArray);

Have a nice try :)

0

I took a long look at many questions like this, and found this post... I didn't like the fact that the conversion code is duplicated for each type, so I've made a generic method to perform the task:

public static byte[] toByteArray(long value, int n)
{
    byte[] ret = new byte[n];
    ret[n-1] = (byte) ((value >> (0*8) & 0xFF);   
    ret[n-2] = (byte) ((value >> (1*8) & 0xFF);   
    ...
    ret[1] = (byte) ((value >> ((n-2)*8) & 0xFF);   
    ret[0] = (byte) ((value >> ((n-1)*8) & 0xFF);   
    return ret;
}

See full post.

1
  • Obviously it loops... not hand made :)
    – TacB0sS
    Commented Jun 3, 2012 at 13:46
0

/*sorry this is the correct */

     public byte[] IntArrayToByteArray(int[] iarray , int sizeofintarray)
     {
       final ByteBuffer bb ;
       bb = ByteBuffer.allocate( sizeofintarray * 4);
       for(int k = 0; k < sizeofintarray ; k++)
       bb.putInt(k * 4, iar[k]);
       return bb.array();
     }
1
  • 1
    Welcome to SO. An explanation would improve this answer.
    – user3717023
    Commented Mar 14, 2016 at 2:50
-1

Instead of allocating space, et al, an approach using ByteBuffer from java.nio....

byte[] arr = { 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x48, 0x01};

// say we want to consider indices 1, 2, 3, 4 {0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x48};
ByteBuffer bf = ByteBuffer.wrap(arr, 1, 4); // big endian by default
int num = bf.getInt();    // 72

Now, to go the other way.

ByteBuffer newBuf = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
newBuf.putInt(num);
byte[] bytes = newBuf.array();  // [0, 0, 0, 72] {0x48 = 72}
-2

here is my implementation

public static byte[] intToByteArray(int a) {
    return BigInteger.valueOf(a).toByteArray();
}

public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) {
    return new BigInteger(b).intValue();
}
2
  • 1
    -1, this will return a different result than asked (it returns the minimum number of bytes instead of 4 bytes). Furthermore, using BigInteger is a bit heavy for this kind of purpose. Commented Jul 10, 2012 at 18:48
  • Not as bad as I expected though, only 20x slower than an optimized version :), mine was not that much faster I must admit. Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 18:31

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