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I am trying to make a dynamic list of general type T which has some operators overloaded for better manipulations. I have added some member functions for various accessibility and sorting kind of things also. In the function findAll(), I am getting an error:

error: passing ‘const List<int>’ as ‘this’ argument discards qualifiers [-fpermissive]"

in a different header file custom exception handling has be done. It will return an exception when the element of the list accessed is not found or searching is done outside the list size.

struct outOfScope : public exception {

const char * what () const throw () {

  return "Couldn't assign or retrieve value!, out of scope 
issue!\n";

}
};

I have already added constant keyword at the end of the function findAll, still the same error displays.

template<class T>
class List //will not work for a list of arrays, and can't be made a typedef of fixed size
//"typedef List<vector> tensor(3)" will not work
//you will have to rather use List<List<vector>>
{
    public:

    T *p = NULL;
    int s;//size
//public:
    //constructor
    List(){p=NULL; s=0;}


    List(int i)
    {
        s = i;
        if(p!=NULL)
        {
            delete [] p;
            p = NULL;
        }
        p = new T [s];
        if(!p)
        {
            throw pointerInitialization();
        }
    }

//copy constructor
    List(const List<T>& l)
    {
        if(p!=NULL)
        {
            delete [] p;
            p = NULL;
        }
        s = l.size();
        s = l.size();
        p = new T [s];  //Don't write in place of 'new T', p = l.p because
        //it will store value without the need to use for loop but destructor 'delete [] p' will delete it multiple times,
        //causing 'double delete error'

        if(!p)
        {
            throw pointerInitialization();
        }

        for(int i=0; i<s; i++)
        {
            p[i] = l.p[i];
        }
    }

    List(List<T>& l)
    {
        if(p!=NULL)
        {
            delete [] p;
            p = NULL;
        }
        s = l.size();
        s = l.size();
        p = new T [s];  //Don't write in place of 'new T', p = l.p because
        //it will store value without the need to use for loop but destructor 'delete [] p' will delete it multiple times,
        //causing 'double delete error'

        if(!p)
        {
            throw pointerInitialization();
        }

        for(int i=0; i<s; i++)
        {
            p[i] = l.p[i];
        }
    }





    void operator=(const List<T>& l)
    {
        if(p!=NULL)
        {
            delete [] p;
            p = NULL;
        }
        s = l.size();
        p = new T [s];
        if(!p)
        {
            throw pointerInitialization();
        }
        for(int i=0; i<s; i++)
        {
            p[i] = l.p[i];
        }
    }

    void operator=(List<T>& l)
    {
        if(p!=NULL)
        {
            delete [] p;
            p = NULL;
        }
        s = l.size();
        p = new T [s];
        if(!p)
        {
            throw pointerInitialization();
        }
        for(int i=0; i<s; i++)
        {
            p[i] = l.p[i];
        }
    }


    //member functions
    void setValues(int i);//can be used to reassign the variables any 


    T& operator[](int i)
    {
        if(i<s && i>=0)
        return p[i];

        else
        {
            throw outOfScope();
        }
    }

    int size(){return s;}

    void addAtEnd(T newEntry)//adding a node at the end of the list
    {
        s = s+1;
        T* newP = new T[s];// new pointer of one greater size is created
        newP[s-1] = newEntry;//at the last node, newEntry is added
        for(int i=0; i<s-1; i++)//for the rest of the entry, *newP copies data of the *p
        {
            newP[i] = p[i];
        }

        delete [] p;//deleting the memory pointed by the pointer p, doesn't mean p has lost its existence
        p = new T[s];//reassigning p to a new memory of size s(no need to use NULL before it as we are already
        //reassigning it again. Also don't write T* p = new T[s], it will create a different p, because now the
        //statement becomes a declaration type, there must not be two declarations of the same name p (once already
        //declared in member variable declaration of class List

        for(int i=0; i<s; i++)
        {
            p[i] = newP[i];
        }

        delete [] newP;
        newP = NULL;
    }

    int find(T value); //takes argument as the element of list, returns the location of list (counting zero as first node)


    List<int> findAll(T value) const//takes argument as the element of list, returns the location of list (counting zero as first node)
    {
        List<int>  locList;
        for(int i=0; i<s; i++)
        {
            if(p[i]==value)
            {
                locList.addAtEnd(i);
            }
        }

        if(locList.size() != 0)
            return locList;

        else
        {
                throw outOfScope();
        }
    }

    bool lookup(T value);



    //destructor
    ~List()
    {
        delete [] p;//means whenever destructor is called to destroy the object,
        //first of all, 'p' will delete the variable it is pointing to. Then the List obj will be destroyed
        p = NULL;
//      cout<<"\ndestructror is called! \n";
    }
};

//--------------------------------------------------------------------------
//macros
#define forAll(List, i)  for(int i=0; i<List.size(); i++)

Implementation code:

#include<iostream>
#include<exception>

int main()
{
List<int> rollNo(5);
int k=0;
rollNo[k++] = 2;
rollNo[k++] = 2;
rollNo[k++] = 3;
rollNo[k++] = 2;
rollNo[k++] = 3;

List<int> findList = rollNo.findAll(rollNo[2]);

forAll(findList, i)
cout<<findList[i]<<endl;


return 0;
}

closed as off-topic by Lightness Races in Orbit, Holt, Szymon Stepniak, llllllllll, πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 2 at 18:00

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Lightness Races in Orbit, Holt, Szymon Stepniak, llllllllll, πάντα ῥεῖ
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the help pages, take the SO tour, read about how to ask good questions, as well as this question checklist. Lastly learn how to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. – Some programmer dude Jan 2 at 12:40
  • To be a bit more specific than @Someprogrammerdude: Add the full error message to your code and indicates on which line it occurs. Provide the necessary members of List so that your code can be compiled (e.g., what are s and p? outOfScope? And remove everything that's unecessary to avoid having a too large code block. – Holt Jan 2 at 12:47
  • If the error really appears in the method you provide, I would say that outOfScope is a member-function of List but is not const-qualified, thus you cannot call it from a const-qualified member function. But we would need the declaration / definition of outOfScope to help you precisely... – Holt Jan 2 at 12:48
  • 1
    @Ujjwal If outOfScope is not a member function, then I don't see how your code could create such error. Again, provide a Minimal, Complete and Verifiable example. – Holt Jan 2 at 12:53
  • 1
    Added the missing members and a trivial use, and there's no problem. As has been noted already, post a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. – molbdnilo Jan 2 at 13:02
2

In this line:

List<int> findList = rollNo.findAll(rollNo[2]);

...you are calling the copy constructor of List<int> that takes a const-reference:

List(const List<T>& l)

In this constructor, you try to access the size of l:

s = l.size();

...but you cannot because l is const-qualified and size() is not, and you can only call const-qualified method on const-qualified variables.

To fix this, you need to const-qualify size():

int size() const { return s; }

Here are some advice for your code, try to lookup a good recent C++ book for more:

  • unless it is an exercice, do not make your own List, use std::vector;
  • use nullptr instead of NULL;
  • do not provide constructor or assignment operators that take non-constant lvalue-reference (List(List<T>&) and operator=(List<T>&);
  • provide move-constructor and move-assignment operator (List(List<T>&&) and operator=(List<T>&&)), see the rule of 0/3/5;
  • return List<T>& from your assignment operators;
  • check the copy-and-swap idiom for your assignment operators;
  • const-qualify the function that should be: size(), find(), lookup();
  • add const-qualified overload for the relevant method: const T& operator[](int i) const;
  • check some C++ utility functions, such as copy or equal_range.
  • 1
    I'd move the last (most important) bullet point to the top – Caleth Jan 2 at 14:33

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