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I'm trying to figure out a good way to bind the view to viewmodel properties that needs to be populated using an async method. The latest I got is using IsAsync like so.

ViewModel.cs

public class ViewModel
{
    public Task<string> Name { get; set; }

    public ViewModel()
    {
        Name = GetNameAsync();
    }

    public async Task<string> GetNameAsync()
    {
        return await Task.Run(async () =>
        {
            await Task.Delay(5000);
            return "Foo";
        });
    }
}

View.xaml

<Label Content="{Binding Name.Result, IsAsync=true}" />

It seems to work but I'm not sure if I'm using IsAsync as it's supposed to be used. The documentation doesn't state anything related to Task and there was also this comment on a stackoverflow that says IsAsync is not related to C# async.

What can go wrong with such implementation?

migrated from softwareengineering.stackexchange.com Jan 2 at 21:41

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The cleanest way to handle this sort of "one time" async property is to use NotifyTaskCompletetion from Stephen Cleary's Nito.Asyncex library (available on Nuget).

You ViewModel would then become

public class ViewModel
{
    public INotifyTaskCompletion<string> Name { get; set; }

    public ViewModel()
    {
        Name = NotifyTaskCompletetion.Complete(GetNameAsync());
    }

    private async Task<string> GetNameAsync()
    {
        return await Task.Run(async () =>
        {
            await Task.Delay(5000);
            return "Foo";
        });
    }
}

You would then bind to Name.Result as a standard binding, no need for IsAsync.

More details here.

0

Correct the IsAsync option is nothing to do with the Task, it just tells the UI to show the fall back value and not block while the get call runs.

What can go wrong with your code. Hmmmmm I think I would have to test to work out if anything actually went wrong. You have a number of 'bad' things.

  1. Code in the constructor. You keep hold of the task reference so, its not all bad, but generally you should not have code like this in a constructor

  2. Calling .Result on a Task. This can cause deadlocks

  3. Having an async Task but not awaiting it.

  4. Using Task.Run inside a Task? You can just call await Task.Delay directly

I would refactor your code as follows

ViewModel

public class ViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private string name
    public string Name {
        get {return name;}
        set {
               name = value;
               PropertyChanged("Name");
        }
    public ICommand GetNameAsync;

    private void PropertyChanged(string prop)
    {
       if( PropertyChanged != null )
       {
          PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(prop);
       }
    }


    public ViewModel()
    {
         Name="Loading...";
         GetNameAsync =  new AsyncCommand(async () => {Name = await GetNameAsync()});
    }

    private async Task<string> GetNameAsync()
    {
        await nameService.getName();
    }
}

XAML

<Window xmlns:i="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity">

    <i:Interaction.Triggers>
        <i:EventTrigger EventName="Loaded">
            <i:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding GetNameAsync}" />
        </i:EventTrigger>
    </i:Interaction.Triggers>

    <Label Content="{Binding Name}" />
</Window>

Now your Xaml will call the GetName function when the window loads, the label will display "Loading..." untill the GetName function completes, when it will update to the Name

Unfortuately

  1. WPF doesnt have an AsyncCommand.

    You have to either make your own, or use one from a third party framework (see below)

  2. INotifyPropertyChanged is a pain in the bum to type out.

    I recommend using Fody with its INotifyPropertyChanged plugin https://github.com/Fody

AsyncCommand

https://mike-ward.net/2013/08/09/asynccommand-implementation-in-wpf/

using System;  
using System.Threading.Tasks;  
using System.Windows.Input;  

namespace OpenWeather.Command  
{  
    internal class AsyncCommand : ICommand  
    {  
        private readonly Func<Task> _execute;  
        private readonly Func<bool> _canExecute;  
        private bool _isExecuting;  

        public AsyncCommand(Func<Task> execute) : this(execute, () => true)  
        {  
        }  

        public AsyncCommand(Func<Task> execute, Func<bool> canExecute)  
        {  
            _execute = execute;  
            _canExecute = canExecute;  
        }  

        public bool CanExecute(object parameter)  
        {  
            return !(_isExecuting && _canExecute());  
        }  

        public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;  

        public async void Execute(object parameter)  
        {  
            _isExecuting = true;  
            OnCanExecuteChanged();  
            try  
            {  
                await _execute();  
            }  
            finally  
            {  
                _isExecuting = false;  
                OnCanExecuteChanged();  
            }  
        }  

        protected virtual void OnCanExecuteChanged()  
        {  
            if (CanExecuteChanged != null) CanExecuteChanged(this, new EventArgs());  
        }  
    }  
}

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