0

Is there an easy way to create a palindrome in C++ given the first half? For example given "abcdef", I want to return "abcdeffedcba", while keeping the input first half unchanged?

I know you could do, but is there a better way to do it in one line? In Java, reverse() returns a value therefore you can do it in one line.

string createPalindrome(string & half)
{
    string temp = half;
    reverse(temp.begin(), temp.end());
    return half + temp;
}
  • 6
    remove all newlines in your code and you'll have a oneliner – phuclv Jan 3 at 4:34
7

If you want to do this in one line, here is an implementation:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

std::string createPalindrome(const std::string & half)
{
    return half + std::string(half.rbegin(), half.rend());
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << createPalindrome("abcdef");
}    

Live Example

Note that this basically taking the string and concatenating it with the reverse of itself.

The half.rbegin() and half.rend() are reverse iterators, so the temporary reverse string is constructed using these iterators.

0

You can put your own convenience functions that better suits your taste on include files. To make such an include file work properly anywhere in your application

  • it should have a unique include guard,
  • functions should be declared inline, and
  • functions should be in their own namespace

like this (on an include file called say strhlp.h),

    // start of include guard 
    // must be first on this file
    // must be unique for this file
#ifndef STRING_HELP_ONCE
#define STRING_HELP_ONCE

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

namespace mystr { // in own namespace

    inline std::string reverse(const std::string& s) { // function declared inline
        std::string t = s;
        std::reverse(t.begin(), t.end());
        return t;
    }

    // ... additional related functions
}

#endif // end of include guard (must be last on file)

This is what your function now looks like,

#include "strhlp.h"

string createPalindrome(string & half)
{
    return half + mystr::reverse(half);
}
-1

It is not necessary to do this in one line. The code you have written is perfectly clean and understandable. If you want to use the reverse method, which I would recommend since it does exactly what you want, you cannot do it in one line anyway.

  • Ok then. Its just in many other languages you can just do it in one line. Converting to C++ having to have 3 lines takes time to adjust to. – Yituo Jan 3 at 4:47
  • Because many of the standard C++ methods deal internally with nothing but raw pointers to memory that could represent anything, you'll find that most of these methods use side effects to accomplish what they're doing instead of returning the result. I think you'll find that (especially when dealing with strings) C++ will usually take more lines to do something than Java would. Roughly. – drew.neely Jan 3 at 4:51

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