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I have overridden toString() of an object called Skeleton, so when I call toString() the color variable is excluded.

public class Skeleton
{
    private List bones;
    private Color color;

    //  getters & setters

    @Override
    public String toString() 
    {
        String s = null;

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        mapper.setAnnotationIntrospector(new JacksonAnnotationIntrospector(){
        @Override
        public boolean hasIgnoreMarker(final AnnotatedMember m) {
                List<String> exclusions = Arrays.asList("color");
                return exclusions.contains(m.getName())|| super.hasIgnoreMarker(m);
            }
        });

        try 
        {
            s = mapper.writeValueAsString(this);

        } catch (JsonProcessingException e) {

            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        return s;
    }
}

However, when I add a Skeleton object as a variable to an object called Body and call toString() on Body the color field of Skeleton is included.

public class Body
{
    private Skeleton skeleton = ....

Does anyone have any idea how to make Body use the overridden toString() method in Skeleton?

  • ...override toString() in Body? – Andy Turner Jan 3 at 11:53
  • 2
    The problem of course being the (probable) use of ObjectMapper in Body.toString by-passing Skeleton.toString. As ObjectMapper is expensive too, its usage is questionable. The least change would be to substitute toString by an interface with represent(ObjectMapper, StringWriter) or such, to walk an entire object hierarchy with one object mapper. – Joop Eggen Jan 3 at 12:01
  • 1
    See this, baeldung.com/jackson-ignore-properties-on-serialization, check Section 5. Ignore Fields Using Filters. – Rupak Jan 3 at 12:10
0

You have to override the toString() method of the Body class and include whatever details you deem necessary. Include the toString() method of the instance variable private Skeleton skeleton = ... and all other member variables that you may have in the Body class.

1

Instead of manually excluding fields in the toString method, which can be tedious and error-prone if other fields need to be excluded (or if color should no longer be excluded), you can use the Jackson @JsonIgnore annotation. Then the toString method in Skeleton can be overridden to print the serialized string:

public class Skeleton {

    private List bones;

    @JsonIgnore
    private Color color;

    @Override
    public String toString() {

        try {
            ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
            return mapper.writeValueAsString(this);
        } 
        catch (JsonProcessingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

As mentioned in the comments, using an ObjectMapper to serialize an object into a String can be expensive if the toString method of Skeleton is frequently used. If performance becomes an issue, the ObjectMapper should only be used to serialize the top-most object (i.e. Body), rather than at each intermediary object (i.e. Skeleton):

public class Skeleton {

    private List bones;

    @JsonIgnore
    private Color color;

    // Getters & setters
}

public class Body {

    private Skeleton skeleton;

    @Override
    public String toString() {

        try {
            ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
            return mapper.writeValueAsString(this);
        } 
        catch (JsonProcessingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Edit based on OP's Feedback

In the case that you want to ignore a field only for a specific ObjectMapper, you can create a SimpleBeanPropertyFilter and specify the name of the field to ignore:

public class Skeleton {

    private List bones;
    private Color color;

    @Override
    public String toString() {

        try {
            ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
            FilterProvider filters = new SimpleFilterProvider()
                .addFilter("ignoreColor", SimpleBeanPropertyFilter.serializeAllExcept("color"));
            return mapper.writer(filters).writeValueAsString(this);
        } 
        catch (JsonProcessingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

For more information, see Section 5: Ignore Fields Using Filters on Jackson Ignore Properties on Marshalling.

  • Unfortunately the above approach works a little too well. If I use the @JsonIgnore annotation the associated field is completely removed when I convert the Java object to a JSON object and send it over the wire. I need to keep the field but just exclude it when I call toString() on the Java object, manual exclusion seems to allow this. By any chance do you know how to manually exclude a field of an internal object? – T-Pane Jan 3 at 13:00
  • @T-Pane Now I understand. I misunderstood your original issue. I have updated the answer above to include a section that addresses your comment. – Justin Albano Jan 3 at 13:24

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