The question is simple: How do you load custom UITableViewCell from Xib files? Doing so allows you to use Interface Builder to design your cells. The answer apparently is not simple due to memory managment issues. This thread mentions the issue and suggests a solution, but is pre NDA-release and lacks code. Here's a long thread that discusses the issue without providing a definitive answer.

Here's some code I've used:

static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"MyCellIdentifier";

MyCell *cell = (MyCell *)[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
if (cell == nil) {
    NSArray *nib = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:CellIdentifier owner:self options:nil];
    cell = (MyCell *)[nib objectAtIndex:0];
}

To use this code, create MyCell.m/.h, a new subclass of UITableViewCell and add IBOutlets for the components you want. Then create a new "Empty XIB" file. Open the Xib file in IB, add a UITableViewCell object, set its identifier to "MyCellIdentifier", and set its class to MyCell and add your components. Finally, connect the IBOutlets to the components. Note that we did not set the File's Owner in IB.

Other methods advocate setting the File's Owner and warn of memory leaks if the Xib is not loaded via an additional factory class. I tested the above under Instruments/Leaks and saw no memory leaks.

So what's the canonical way to load cells from Xibs? Do we set File's Owner? Do we need a factory? If so, what's the code for the factory look like? If there are multiple solutions, let's clarify the pros and cons of each of them...

22 Answers 22

up vote 284 down vote accepted

Here are two methods which the original author states was recommended by an IB engineer.

See the actual post for more details. I prefer method #2 as it seems simpler.

Method #1:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"BDCustomCell"];
    if (cell == nil) {
        // Create a temporary UIViewController to instantiate the custom cell.
        UIViewController *temporaryController = [[UIViewController alloc] initWithNibName:@"BDCustomCell" bundle:nil];
        // Grab a pointer to the custom cell.
        cell = (BDCustomCell *)temporaryController.view;
        [[cell retain] autorelease];
        // Release the temporary UIViewController.
        [temporaryController release];
    }

    return cell;
}

Method #2:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"BDCustomCell"];
    if (cell == nil) {
        // Load the top-level objects from the custom cell XIB.
        NSArray *topLevelObjects = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"BDCustomCell" owner:self options:nil];
        // Grab a pointer to the first object (presumably the custom cell, as that's all the XIB should contain).
        cell = [topLevelObjects objectAtIndex:0];
    }

    return cell;
}

Update (2014): Method #2 is still valid but there is no documentation for it anymore. It used to be in the official docs but is now removed in favor of storyboards.

I posted a working example on Github:
https://github.com/bentford/NibTableCellExample

  • 1
    For method 1, shouldn't you do something like "cell = (BDCustomCell *)[[temporaryController.view retain] autorelease];" so cell doesn't get released when the temporary controller is released? – Tod Cunningham May 29 '11 at 17:28
  • Hm. The documentation that talks about #2 still tells you to set the cell's owner in the XIB file, to a known controller class. Perhaps it doesn't matter when you set the owner during loading. – Oscar Dec 2 '11 at 20:01
  • @OscarGoldman The cell's owner in the XIB file is a class (ie. the type of owner.) The cell's owner in loadNibNamed:owner:options: is a object of the type specified in the XIB. – bentford Dec 3 '11 at 0:13
  • 2
    @CoolDocMan Option #2 still works. Problem is most likely with the nib. Here is an example: github.com/bentford/NibTableCellExample – bentford Apr 23 '14 at 20:33
  • Hi @bentford, I downloaded gitHub project and worked fine, but i want to know how can set value for each row, for now all row is same ( some label ), i'm new to iOS, thanks for time, as I can't set outlet for Label so i don't know how can change value of that – Shayan Pourvatan Jun 6 '14 at 19:16

The right solution is this:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
 [super viewDidLoad];
 UINib *nib = [UINib nibWithNibName:@"ItemCell" bundle:nil];
 [[self tableView] registerNib:nib forCellReuseIdentifier:@"ItemCell"];
}

-(UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
   // Create an instance of ItemCell
   PointsItemCell *cell =  [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"ItemCell"];

return cell;
}
  • is that going to break iOS5 apps? I have genuinely never seen UINib – Adam Waite Jul 4 '13 at 14:43
  • 1
    Why break? It is standard way to register a nib for custom UITableViewCell.. – giuseppe Jul 5 '13 at 16:17
  • @AdamWaite Registering NIB files works for iOS 5 and later, so it is not breaking iOS 5 apps. And UINib even exists since iOS 4. – Mecki May 7 '14 at 10:50
  • And how do you call an action inside the controller for a button inside the xib? I instantiate the nib after loading with nib.instantiateWithOwner(self, options: nil), then i drag from the xib to the VC for creating an action, then i get an error with no output – Godfather Mar 11 '15 at 7:54
  • For a good example, check the git repo referenced in the top answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/18746929/… – netigger Mar 17 '16 at 19:13

Register

After iOS 7, this process has been simplified down to (swift 3.0):

// For registering nib files
tableView.register(UINib(nibName: "MyCell", bundle: Bundle.main), forCellReuseIdentifier: "cell")

// For registering classes
tableView.register(MyCellClass.self, forCellReuseIdentifier: "cell")

(Note) This is also achievable by creating the cells in the .xib or .stroyboard files, as prototype cells. If you need to attach a class to them, you can select the cell prototype and add the corresponding class (must be a descendant of UITableViewCell, of course).

Dequeue

And later on, dequeued using (swift 3.0):

override func tableView(tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> UITableViewCell
{
    let cell : UITableViewCell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: "cell", for: indexPath)

    cell.textLabel?.text = "Hello"

    return cell
}

The difference being that this new method not only dequeues the cell, it also creates if non-existant (that means that you don't have to do if (cell == nil) shenanigans), and the cell is ready to use just as in the example above.

(Warning) tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier:for:) has the new behavior, if you call the other one (without indexPath:) you get the old behavior, in which you need to check for nil and instance it yourself, notice the UITableViewCell? return value.

if let cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: "cell", for: indexPath) as? MyCellClass
{
    // Cell be casted properly
    cell.myCustomProperty = true
}
else
{
    // Wrong type? Wrong identifier?
}

And of course, the type of the associated class of the cell is the one you defined in the .xib file for the UITableViewCell subclass, or alternatively, using the other register method.

Configuration

Ideally, your cells have been already configured in terms of appearance and content positioning (like labels and image views) by the time you registered them, and on the cellForRowAtIndexPath method you simply fill them in.

All together

class MyCell : UITableViewCell
{
    // Can be either created manually, or loaded from a nib with prototypes
    @IBOutlet weak var labelSomething : UILabel? = nil
}

class MasterViewController: UITableViewController 
{
    var data = ["Hello", "World", "Kinda", "Cliche", "Though"]

    // Register
    override func viewDidLoad()
    {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        tableView.register(MyCell.self, forCellReuseIdentifier: "mycell")
        // or the nib alternative
    }

    override func tableView(tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int
    {
        return data.count
    }

    // Dequeue
    override func tableView(tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> UITableViewCell
    {
        let cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: "mycell", for: indexPath) as! MyCell

        cell.labelSomething?.text = data[indexPath.row]

        return cell
    }
}

And of course, this is all available in ObjC with the same names.

  • Here is the objC version: [self.tableView registerNib:[UINib nibWithNibName:@"BlaBlaTableViewCell" bundle:nil] forCellReuseIdentifier:kCellIdentifier]; – Zeb Jun 26 '15 at 14:24

Took Shawn Craver's answer and cleaned it up a bit.

BBCell.h:

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface BBCell : UITableViewCell {
}

+ (BBCell *)cellFromNibNamed:(NSString *)nibName;

@end

BBCell.m:

#import "BBCell.h"

@implementation BBCell

+ (BBCell *)cellFromNibNamed:(NSString *)nibName {
    NSArray *nibContents = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:nibName owner:self options:NULL];
    NSEnumerator *nibEnumerator = [nibContents objectEnumerator];
    BBCell *customCell = nil;
    NSObject* nibItem = nil;
    while ((nibItem = [nibEnumerator nextObject]) != nil) {
        if ([nibItem isKindOfClass:[BBCell class]]) {
            customCell = (BBCell *)nibItem;
            break; // we have a winner
        }
    }
    return customCell;
}

@end

I make all my UITableViewCell's subclasses of BBCell, and then replace the standard

cell = [[[BBDetailCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:@"BBDetailCell"] autorelease];

with:

cell = (BBDetailCell *)[BBDetailCell cellFromNibNamed:@"BBDetailCell"];

I used bentford's Method #2:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"BDCustomCell"];
    if (cell == nil) {
        // Load the top-level objects from the custom cell XIB.
        NSArray *topLevelObjects = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"BDCustomCell" owner:self options:nil];
        // Grab a pointer to the first object (presumably the custom cell, as that's all the XIB should contain).
        cell = [topLevelObjects objectAtIndex:0];
    }

    return cell;
}

It works, but watch out for connections to File's Owner in your custom UITableViewCell .xib file.

By passing owner:self in your loadNibNamed statement, you set the UITableViewController as File's Owner of your UITableViewCell.

If you drag and drop to the header file in IB to set up actions and outlets, it will set them up as File's Owner by default.

In loadNibNamed:owner:options, Apple's code will try to set properties on your UITableViewController, since that's the owner. But you don't have those properties defined there, so you get an error about being key value coding-compliant:

*** Terminating app due to uncaught exception 'NSUnknownKeyException', reason:     '[<MyUITableViewController 0x6a383b0> setValue:forUndefinedKey:]: this class is not key value coding-compliant for the key myLabel.'

If an Event gets triggered instead, you'll get an NSInvalidArgumentException:

-[MyUITableViewController switchValueDidChange:]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x8e9acd0
*** Terminating app due to uncaught exception 'NSInvalidArgumentException', reason: '-[MyUITableViewController switchValueDidChange:]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x8e9acd0'
*** First throw call stack:
(0x1903052 0x15eed0a 0x1904ced 0x1869f00 0x1869ce2 0x1904ec9 0x5885c2 0x58855a 0x62db76 0x62e03f 0x77fa6c 0x24e86d 0x18d7966 0x18d7407 0x183a7c0 0x1839db4 0x1839ccb 0x1f8b879 0x1f8b93e 0x585a9b 0xb904d 0x2c75)
terminate called throwing an exceptionCurrent language:  auto; currently objective-c

An easy workaround is to point your Interface Builder connections at the UITableViewCell instead of File's Owner:

  1. Right click on File's Owner to pull up the list of connections
  2. Take a screen capture with Command-Shift-4 (drag to select the area to be captured)
  3. x out the connections from File's Owner
  4. Right click on the UITableCell in the Object hierarchy and re-add the connections.
  • I had the problem you mentioned, but how to point the connections to the UITableViewCell instead of File's owner? I don't understand your steps, e.g. why is taking a screenshot needed? and when I clicked the add button next to the outlet, nothing happens – xu huanze Mar 23 '13 at 7:59
  • @xuhuanze I suggested taking a screenshot so you have a record of what things File's owner was already connected to. Then you can re-create those same connections. You need to drag and drop to add the connections--not just single click. – funroll Mar 25 '13 at 17:51
  • Thanks a lot, I had "this class is not key value coding-compliant for the key" problem and solved it by your help. I want to tell others, that you also should change a class of your UITableViewCell to your class, that you use as a custom cell class. – wzbozon Aug 19 '13 at 13:40

I've decided to post since I don't like any of these answers -- things can always be more simple and this is by far the most concise way I've found.

1. Build your Xib in Interface Builder as you like it

  • Set File's Owner to class NSObject
  • Add a UITableViewCell and set its class to MyTableViewCellSubclass -- if your IB crashes (happens in Xcode > 4 as of this writing), just use a UIView of do the interface in Xcode 4 if you still have it laying around
  • Layout your subviews inside this cell and attach your IBOutlet connections to your @interface in the .h or .m (.m is my preference)

2. In your UIViewController or UITableViewController subclass

@implementation ViewController

static NSString *cellIdentifier = @"MyCellIdentier";

- (void) viewDidLoad {

    ...
    [self.tableView registerNib:[UINib nibWithNibName:@"MyTableViewCellSubclass" bundle:nil] forCellReuseIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
}

- (UITableViewCell*) tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    MyTableViewCellSubclass *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:cellIdentifier];

    ...

    return cell;
}

3. In your MyTableViewCellSubclass

- (id) initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)aDecoder {
    if (self = [super initWithCoder:aDecoder]) {
        ...
    }

    return self;
}

If you're using Interface Builder to make cells, check that you've set the Identifier in the Inspector. Then check that it's the same when calling dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier.

I accidentally forgot to set some identifiers in a table-heavy project, and the performance change was like night and day.

Loading UITableViewCells from XIBs saves a lot of code, but usually results in horrible scrolling speed (actually, it's not the XIB but the excessive use of UIViews that cause this).

I suggest you take a look at this: Link reference

Here's the class method that I've been using for creating custom cells out of XIBs:

+ (CustomCell*) createNewCustomCellFromNib {

    NSArray* nibContents = [[NSBundle mainBundle]
                            loadNibNamed:@"CustomCell" owner:self options:NULL];

    NSEnumerator *nibEnumerator = [nibContents objectEnumerator];
    CustomCell *customCell= nil;
    NSObject* nibItem = nil;

    while ( (nibItem = [nibEnumerator nextObject]) != nil) {

        if ( [nibItem isKindOfClass: [CustomCell class]]) {
            customCell = (CustomCell*) nibItem;

            if ([customCell.reuseIdentifier isEqualToString: @"CustomCell"]) {
                break; // we have a winner
            }
            else
                fuelEntryCell = nil;
        }
    }
    return customCell;
}

Then, in the XIB, I set the class name, and reuse identifier. After that, I can just call that method in my view controller instead of the

[[UITableViewCell] alloc] initWithFrame:]

It's plenty fast enough, and being used in two of my shipping applications. It's more reliable than calling [nib objectAtIndex:0], and in my mind at least, more reliable than Stephan Burlot's example because you're guaranteed to only grab a view out of a XIB that is the right type.

Correct Solution is this

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    [self.tableView registerNib:[UINib nibWithNibName:@"CustomCell" bundle:[NSBundle mainBundle]] forCellReuseIdentifier:@"CustomCell"];
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath{
    UITableViewCell  *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"CustomCell"];
    return cell; 
    }

Reloading the NIB is expensive. Better to load it once, then instantiate the objects when you need a cell. Note that you can add UIImageViews etc to the nib, even multiple cells, using this method (Apple's "registerNIB" iOS5 allows only one top level object - Bug 10580062 "iOS5 tableView registerNib: overly restrictive"

So my code is below - you read in the NIB once (in initialize like I did or in viewDidload - whatever. From then on, you instantiate the nib into objects then pick the one you need. This is much more efficient than loading the nib over and over.

static UINib *cellNib;

+ (void)initialize
{
    if(self == [ImageManager class]) {
        cellNib = [UINib nibWithNibName:@"ImageManagerCell" bundle:nil];
        assert(cellNib);
    }
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    static NSString *cellID = @"TheCell";

    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:cellID];
    if(cell == nil) {
        NSArray *topLevelItems = [cellNib instantiateWithOwner:nil options:nil];
        NSUInteger idx = [topLevelItems indexOfObjectPassingTest:^BOOL(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop)
                            {
                                UITableViewCell *cell = (UITableViewCell *)obj;
                                return [cell isKindOfClass:[UITableViewCell class]] && [cell.reuseIdentifier isEqualToString:cellID];
                            } ];
        assert(idx != NSNotFound);
        cell = [topLevelItems objectAtIndex:idx];
    }
    cell.textLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Howdie %d", indexPath.row];

    return cell;
}

Check this - http://eppz.eu/blog/custom-uitableview-cell/ - really convenient way using a tiny class that ends up one line in controller implementation:

-(UITableViewCell*)tableView:(UITableView*) tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath*) indexPath
{
    return [TCItemCell cellForTableView:tableView
                          atIndexPath:indexPath
                      withModelSource:self];
}

enter image description here

The correct way to do it is to create a UITableViewCell subclass implementation, header, and XIB. In the XIB remove any views and just add a table cell. Set the class as the name of the UITableViewCell subclass. For file owner, make it the UITableViewController subclass class name. Connect the file owner to the cell using the tableViewCell outlet.

In the header file:

UITableViewCell *_tableViewCell;
@property (assign) IBOutlet UITableViewCell *tableViewCell;

In the implementation file:

@synthesize tableViewCell = _tableViewCell;

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    static NSString *kCellIdentifier = @"reusableCell";

    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:kCellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:kCellIdentifier owner:self options:nil];
        cell = _tableViewCell;
        self.tableViewCell = nil;
    }

    return cell;
}

What I do for this is declare an IBOutlet UITableViewCell *cell in your controller class. Then invoke the NSBundle loadNibNamed class method, which will feed the UITableViewCell to the cell declared above.

For the xib I will create an empty xib and add the UITableViewCell object in IB where it can be setup as needed. This view is then connected to the cell IBOutlet in the controller class.

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)table
         cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    NSLog(@"%@ loading RTEditableCell.xib", [self description] );

    static NSString *MyIdentifier = @"editableCellIdentifier";
    cell = [table dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:MyIdentifier];

    if(cell == nil) {
        [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"RTEditableCell"
                                      owner:self
                                    options:nil];
    }

    return cell;
}

NSBundle additions loadNibNamed (ADC login)

cocoawithlove.com article I sourced the concept from (get the phone numbers sample app)

First import your custom cell file #import "CustomCell.h" and then change the delegate method as below mentioned:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {

static NSString *simpleTableIdentifier = @"CustomCell";

CustomCell *cell = (CustomCell *)[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:simpleTableIdentifier];
if (cell == nil)
{
    NSArray *nib = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"CustomCell" owner:self options:nil];
    cell = [nib objectAtIndex:0];

    [cell setSelectionStyle:UITableViewCellSelectionStyleNone];
}         

     return cell;
}
  1. Create your own customized class AbcViewCell subclass from UITableViewCell (Make sure your class file name and nib file name are the same)

  2. Create this extension class method.

    extension UITableViewCell {
        class func fromNib<T : UITableViewCell>() -> T {
            return Bundle.main.loadNibNamed(String(describing: T.self), owner: nil, options: nil)?[0] as! T
        }
    }
    
  3. Use it.

    let cell: AbcViewCell = UITableViewCell.fromNib()

I dont know if there is a canonical way, but here's my method:

  • Create a xib for a ViewController
  • Set the File Owner class to UIViewController
  • Delete the view and add an UITableViewCell
  • Set the Class of your UITableViewCell to your custom class
  • Set the Identifier of your UITableViewCell
  • Set the outlet of your view controller view to your UITableViewCell

And use this code:

MyCustomViewCell *cell = (MyCustomViewCell *)[_tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
if (cell == nil) {
  UIViewController* c = [[UIViewController alloc] initWithNibName:CellIdentifier bundle:nil];
  cell = (MyCustomViewCell *)c.view;
  [c release];
}

In your example, using

[nib objectAtIndex:0]

may break if Apple changes the order of items in the xib.

  • For me, this results in creating a new instance always. dequeue seems to be returning nil every time. – strange Dec 2 '13 at 19:03

Here is my method for that: Loading Custom UITableViewCells from XIB Files… Yet Another Method

The idea is to create a SampleCell subclass of the UITableViewCell with a IBOutlet UIView *content property and a property for each custom subview you need to configure from the code. Then to create a SampleCell.xib file. In this nib file, change the file owner to SampleCell. Add a content UIView sized to fit your needs. Add and configure all the subviews (label, image views, buttons, etc) you want. Finally, link the content view and the subviews to the file owner.

 NSString *CellIdentifier = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"cell %ld %ld",(long)indexPath.row,(long)indexPath.section];


    NewsFeedCell *cell = (NewsFeedCell *)[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    cell=nil;

    if (cell == nil)
    {
        NSArray *topLevelObjects = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"NewsFeedCell" owner:nil options:nil];

        for(id currentObject in topLevelObjects)
        {
            if([currentObject isKindOfClass:[NewsFeedCell class]])
            {
                cell = (NewsFeedCell *)currentObject;
                break;
            }
        }
}
return cell;

This extension requires Xcode7 beta6

extension NSBundle {
    enum LoadViewError: ErrorType {
        case ExpectedXibToExistButGotNil
        case ExpectedXibToContainJustOneButGotDifferentNumberOfObjects
        case XibReturnedWrongType
    }

    func loadView<T>(name: String) throws -> T {
        let topLevelObjects: [AnyObject]! = loadNibNamed(name, owner: self, options: nil)
        if topLevelObjects == nil {
            throw LoadViewError.ExpectedXibToExistButGotNil
        }
        if topLevelObjects.count != 1 {
            throw LoadViewError.ExpectedXibToContainJustOneButGotDifferentNumberOfObjects
        }
        let firstObject: AnyObject! = topLevelObjects.first
        guard let result = firstObject as? T else {
            throw LoadViewError.XibReturnedWrongType
        }
        return result
    }
}

Create an Xib file that contains just 1 custom UITableViewCell.

Load it.

let cell: BacteriaCell = try NSBundle.mainBundle().loadView("BacteriaCell")

Here is a universal approach for registering cells in UITableView:

protocol Reusable {
    static var reuseID: String { get }
}

extension Reusable {
    static var reuseID: String {
        return String(describing: self)
    }
}

extension UITableViewCell: Reusable { }

extension UITableView {

func register<T: UITableViewCell>(cellClass: T.Type = T.self) {
    let bundle = Bundle(for: cellClass.self)
    if bundle.path(forResource: cellClass.reuseID, ofType: "nib") != nil {
        let nib = UINib(nibName: cellClass.reuseID, bundle: bundle)
        register(nib, forCellReuseIdentifier: cellClass.reuseID)
    } else {
        register(cellClass.self, forCellReuseIdentifier: cellClass.reuseID)
    }
}

Explanation:

  1. Reusable protocol generates cell ID from its class name. Make sure you follow the convention: cell ID == class name == nib name.
  2. UITableViewCell conforms to Reusable protocol.
  3. UITableView extension abstracts away the difference in registering cells via nib or class.

Usage example:

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    let tableView = UITableView()
    let cellClasses: [UITableViewCell.Type] = [PostCell.self, ProfileCell.self, CommentCell.self]
    cellClasses.forEach(tableView.register)
}

override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
    let cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: PostCell.self.reuseID) as? PostCell
    ...
    return cell
}
 func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {

            let cellReuseIdentifier = "collabCell"
            var cell:collabCell! = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: cellReuseIdentifier) as? collabCell
            if cell == nil {
                tableView.register(UINib(nibName: "collabCell", bundle: nil), forCellReuseIdentifier: cellReuseIdentifier)
                cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: cellReuseIdentifier) as! collabCell!
            }


            return cell

}

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