8

Such as:

let mut a : usize = 0xFF;
a += -1;  // -1 may be from other variable, so there can't be a -= 1;
println!("{}", a);

The output is:

error[E0277]: the trait bound `usize: std::ops::Neg` is not satisfied

anyway?

4
  • 1
    Unfortunately the error message doesn't help you much. – Stargateur Jan 4 '19 at 9:14
  • Are you stuck with usize, or could you use isize instead? Or even better, a known bitwidth type like i64? – Matthieu M. Jan 4 '19 at 12:36
  • @MatthieuM. In fact it is index of array, which can only be $usize$ – Excosy S.P. Jan 4 '19 at 13:10
  • See also this discussion on Reddit. – Sven Marnach Jan 4 '19 at 22:17
4

Your attempt does not work because in Rust, you can only do operations between strictly similar types. Rust does not do any implicit numeric cast because it would be a shoot in the foot as you can see below: you have a special case and several ways to have an overflow.

One way to go is to cast the absolute value of the i32 to usize and add or remove it according to whether it is negative or positive. However, you must handle the special case of the minimal value that overflows when you take its absolute value:

fn add(u: usize, i: i32) -> usize {
    if i.is_negative() {
        u - i.wrapping_abs() as u32 as usize
    } else {
        u + i as usize
    }
}

fn main() {
    let u = 7;
    let i1 = -1;
    let i2 = 1;
    let min = -2_147_483_648;

    assert_eq!(add(u, i1), 6);
    assert_eq!(add(u, i2), 8);
    assert_eq!(add(3_000_000_000, min), 852_516_352);
}

You may also verify the overflows:

fn add(u: usize, i: i32) -> Option<usize> {
    if i.is_negative() {
        u.checked_sub(i.wrapping_abs() as u32 as usize)
    } else {
        u.checked_add(i as usize)
    }
}

fn main() {
    let u = 7;
    let i1 = -1;
    let i2 = 1;

    assert_eq!(add(u, i1), Some(6));
    assert_eq!(add(u, i2), Some(8));
    assert_eq!(add(0, -1), None);
}
9
  • It seems like the cost of conditional jump is larger than implicit cast. Adding after numeric cast only need to ignore OF bit. – Excosy S.P. Jan 4 '19 at 10:17
  • @ExcosyS.P. The checked operations have a (very slight) cost. However, as far as I know, the explicit cast is not slower than an implicit cast. There is the same cast in both the cases. – Boiethios Jan 4 '19 at 10:20
  • Maybe I didn't understood your question: is your number always negative? – Boiethios Jan 4 '19 at 10:25
  • Thanks a lot. Moreover, what I wonder is why not support implicit numeric cast in rust. – Excosy S.P. Jan 4 '19 at 10:30
  • 1
    @ExcosyS.P. An implicit numeric cast is dangerous, because you may have an unexpected result: what if the compiler silently casts a negative i32 to an usize with two's complement? The result would be more likely unexpected. – Boiethios Jan 4 '19 at 10:50

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