8

I'm trying to scrape a webpage using the Select crate:

let document = Document::from_read(response).unwrap();

for node in document.find(Class("lia-list-row")) {
    let title = node.find(Class("page-link")).next().unwrap();
    let title_text = title.text().trim();

    println!("{}\n", title_text);
}

Which results in following error:

let title_text = title.text().trim();
                 ^^^^^^^^^^^^       - temporary value is freed at the end of this statement
                 |
                 creates a temporary which is freed while still in use

println!("{} - {}\n", i, title_text);
                         ---------- borrow used here, in later iteration of loop

I solved it by separating the .text() and .trim()

let title_text = title.text();
let trim_text = title_text.trim();

What is the difference? Why did the first attempt fail?

15
0

This one seems convoluted at first, but remember that String and &str are different beasts.

String can live and be used on its own, but &str is just a reference to part of String. So, &str can live as long as referenced String lives. Lets see how it should work on return signatures.

let title_text = title   .text()   .trim();
//               ^       ^         ^
//               Node    String <- &str
  1. Here, title is a select::Node.

  2. Node::text returns a String, but nothing binds it to context.

  3. String::trim, in turn, returns a &str which is a reference to part of String itself.

In the end, the borrow checker just doesn't understand how it should process a reference to String that will not live long enough in context, as it is a temporary value (non-bound).

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Aha, now it makes more sense! Thanks for the explanation. – mottosson Jan 7 '19 at 9:57
  • 1
    Is there a way to solve this without declaring a new variable? – rm.rf.etc Mar 13 '19 at 17:11
  • @rm.rf.etc No, I do not think it is possible in the straightforward way in this context. Rust temporaries work a little bit different than rvalues (temporaries) in the mainstream languages. – TSB99X Mar 13 '19 at 19:47
  • 4
    @rm.rf.etc you could use title.text().trim().to_string() if you tolerate a copy. – bohdan_trotsenko Apr 23 '19 at 11:04

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