What would be a good algorithm for taking a timestamp that contains year, month, day, hour, minute, second and convert it into a 7 digit or less(but consistent) alphanumeric representation. The alphanumeric representation won't distinguish between upper and lower case letters.

  • 5
    There are ~64.47 million combinations of the digits and letters (assuming you're using both uppercase and lowercase). This is less than the number of seconds in 2 years. You're not going to get uniqueness; there will be collisions. – Wooble Mar 23 '11 at 13:13
  • Does it have to be 6 characters? If not, UUIDs based on timestamp might be a good solution: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universally_unique_identifier – orangepips Mar 23 '11 at 13:15
  • @wooble: I might need some help here, what's your calculation ? I get something like 56.8 billion combinations ? – Antoine Pelisse Mar 23 '11 at 13:23
  • @Wooble.. how? There would be 62^6 = about 52.8 billion combinations right? Should last for more than 1000 years.. – Hari Menon Mar 23 '11 at 13:23
  • I am confused as to how you come up with 64 million? I seem to get 2 billion. I don't doubt you as my math skills are bad but could you please explain. If my math is right then maybe 7 digits would work? – Mike Mar 23 '11 at 13:25
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Let's do some maths

You can use 7 alphanumeric digits. Each alphanumeric digit take a value from 36 possible different values (26 letters, 10 decimal digits) So we have 36^7 different values, that is 78364164096.

Now we compute the number of different values needed to represent a given timestamp in one year. To simplify things a bit we will allow some values that will never happen (ex: 31th november).

Thus, we have

month: 12  -> coded from 0 to 11
day: 31  -> coded from 0 to 30
hour: 24
minute: 60
second: 60 

which gives use 32140800 different possibilites

We now divide 78364164096 / 32140800 which is ~2438, thus we will give an enumeration of timestamps from 00:00 jan 1 0000 to 23:59 dec 31 2437

The encoding is then

X = second + minute*60 + hour*60*60 + 
    day*60*60*24 + month*60*60*24*31 + 
    year*60*60*24*31*12

And the decoding is

second = X mod 60
minute = (X div 60) mod 60
hour = (X div 60*60) mod 24
day = (X div 60*60*24) mod 31
month = (X div 60*60*24*31) mod 12
year = X div 60*60*24*31*12

Let's look at an example:

Suppose you want to encode the date december 20, 1998, 05:33:12 So you would have

second: 12
minute: 33
hour: 5
day: 19   -> note that we encode days in the range 0..31
month: 11  -> note that we conde months in the range 0..11
year: 1998

So we compute:

X = 12 + 33*60 + 5*60*60 + 
        19*60*60*24 + 11*60*60*24*31 + 
        1998*60*60*24*31*12

That is, X = 12 + 1980 + 18000 + 1641600 + 29462400 + 64217318400 = 64248442392

And now we decode it

second = 64248442392 mod 60  = 12
minute = (64248442392 div 60) mod 60 = 33
hour = (64248442392 div 60*60) mod 24 = 5
day = (64248442392 div 60*60*24) mod 31 = 19
month = (64248442392 div 60*60*24*31) mod 12 = 11
year = 64248442392 div 60*60*24*31*12 = 1998
  • I am so sorry, my question was not clear enough i will edit it. I don't want to differentiate lower case and upper case. Since that decreases possibilities a lot, i think i will increase to 7 digits if necessary. – Mike Mar 23 '11 at 13:30
  • I have to admit i am somewhat confused by your answer. Maybe you could give an example of a timestamp along with its encoding. – Mike Mar 23 '11 at 13:39
  • @Mike: I added an example – gusbro Mar 23 '11 at 13:50
  • Then i would do a base conversion to get 7 digit alphanumeric?? – Mike Mar 23 '11 at 14:47
  • @Mike: Yes, you have to do a base conversion (to base 36). For each digit, if it is < 10 you would add 48 (to get '0'..'9'), otherwise from 10..36 you would add 55 (to get 'A'..'Z') – gusbro Mar 23 '11 at 15:07

I wrote the code for coding integers to short strings along with some considerations in my answer to a previous question.

You still have to decide how to map datetimes to integers, but other answers already address that.

Consider a higher than decimal numeral system. For example, the hexadecimal numeral system is base-16. Let's say in our new numeral system, we have digits 0-9, the lower-case alphabet (a-z) and the upper case alphabet (A-Z). This gives us 62 possible digits, so we can use a base-62 numeral system. Here's some Javascript code to do the conversion -

function createConverter() {
    var charRange = (start, end) => Array.from(Array(end-start), 
                                         (v, i) => String.fromCharCode(i + start))

    var digits = charRange(48, 48+10)             // 0 to 9
                   .concat(charRange(97, 97+26))  // a to b
                   .concat(charRange(65, 65+26))  // A to B

    var base = digits.length

    return function(decimal) {
            var result = ""
            while (decimal >= base) {
                result = digits[decimal % base] + result
                decimal = parseInt(decimal / base)
            }
            result = digits[decimal] + result
            return result
        }
}

var convert = createConverter()
convert(parseInt(Date.now() / 1000)) // returns a 6-digit alphanumeric string 

charRange is just a utility arrow function to create a range of characters from ASCII codes

digits represents all the valid digits in our numeral system. You can add more valid digits (like special chars) to this list

base is the number (in decimal) of available digits

Output encoded in this base-62 numeral system will stay 6 digits long for more than 1,700 years.

EDIT: Realized Date.now() returns timestamp in milliseconds not seconds, so I've updated my answer to reflect that

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