117
sudo find /etc | xargs grep -i fedora > searchFedora

gives:

/etc/netplug.d/netplug: # At least on Fedora Core 1
...

But see the Fedora version in the /etc/netplug.d/netplug file. Is it serious?

  • 5
    Should be migrated to unix.stackexchange.com – Atiq Rahman Apr 22 '13 at 11:07
  • @Fuser97381: That is not true. Curatorship is important and curating does not take place through Google. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 23 '16 at 17:08
  • 1
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit False. Curation (not curatorship, wtf) might be important for the owners of the sites who are making a living off the labour of content creators, but users find information through google, which indexes both sites, so it doesn't matter to them. – Darth Egregious Jun 25 '16 at 12:50
  • @Fuser97381: I know it doesn't matter to them, but you insinuated that it does not matter at all, which is false. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 27 '16 at 10:10
  • 1
    cat /etc/fedora-release/ – Seraf Dec 20 '17 at 16:36

11 Answers 11

148
cat /etc/issue

Or cat /etc/fedora-release as suggested by @Bruce ONeel

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  • Thanks, Indeed is a Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS release 4 (Nahant Update 5) – pindare Feb 12 '09 at 9:47
  • 10
    However, this won't work if anyone's changed the login banners … I typically edit mine, and so, it seems, do many (most) corporate IT departments... :-( – BRPocock Dec 2 '11 at 16:05
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    That's a wrong answer. The answer of @BruceONeel should be accepted as the correct one – Igor Chubin May 7 '17 at 15:33
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    Doesn't work in fedora 26. However Bruce's answer works. – Leo Ufimtsev Sep 29 '17 at 16:29
  • 9
    \S Kernel \r on an \m (\l) – MariuszS Nov 9 '17 at 8:16
136

You can also try /etc/redhat-release or /etc/fedora-release:

cat /etc/fedora-release 
Fedora release 7 (Moonshine)
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  • 16
    cat /etc/redhat-release works for me too, but the better is cat /etc/os-release which really gives detailled information. – Olivier Faucheux Sep 4 '15 at 12:02
50

The proposed standard file is /etc/os-release. See http://www.freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/os-release.html

You can execute something like:

$ source /etc/os-release
$ echo $ID
fedora
$ echo $VERSION_ID
17
$ echo $VERSION
17 (Beefy Miracle)
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  • 1
    I never thought of using source to load the variables, I always tried to parse the values. Brilliant! – wisbucky Aug 13 '18 at 22:22
21

The simplest command which can give you what you need but some other good info too is:

hostnamectl
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  • 1
    This is definitely the most convenient answer and also shows the bitness. Nice! – Joshua Sleeper Aug 24 '18 at 22:06
20

You could try

lsb_release -a

which works on at least Debian and Ubuntu (and since it's LSB, it should surely be on most of the other mainstream distros at least). http://rpmfind.net/linux/RPM/sourceforge/l/ls/lsb/lsb_release-1.0-1.i386.html suggests it's been around quite a while.

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  • 1
    It's in package redhat-lsb, which wasn't installed by default on my box at work, at least (Fedora 15) (corporate IT fail?) but was on my home Fedora 16 box. (Not sure if it's a default package or not) – BRPocock Dec 2 '11 at 16:03
  • 1
    Or lsb_release -d for a shorter output. – ROMANIA_engineer Dec 12 '16 at 21:02
8
cat /etc/*release

It's universal for almost any major distribution.

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  • 1
    This is very true! This command can be used on practically any Linux distro. – specialk1st Nov 26 '17 at 9:03
6
[Belmiro@HP-550 ~]$ uname -a

Linux HP-550 2.6.30.10-105.2.23.fc11.x86_64 #1 SMP Thu Feb 11 07:06:34 UTC 2010
x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux


[Belmiro@HP-550 ~]$ lsb_release -a

LSB Version: :core-3.1-amd64:core-3.1-noarch:core-3.2-amd64:core-3.2-noarch:deskt
op-3.1-amd64:desktop-3.1-noarch:desktop-3.2-amd64:desktop-3.2-noarch
Distributor ID: Fedora
Description: Fedora release 11 (Leonidas)
Release: 11
Codename: Leonidas
[Belmiro@HP-550 ~]$ 
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5

What about uname -a ?

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  • That gives the version of the Linux kernel, which might be from a different version of FC or RHEL. It's debatable if the OS remains that reported by /etc/issue if you change the kernel, but there you are. :) – David Grant Feb 12 '09 at 10:14
  • uname -a does not give the distrib but kernel, network, machine, processor, hardware and GNU/Linux for operating system! That is not enough. – pindare Feb 12 '09 at 12:19
  • uname -a on fedora 19: Linux hostname 3.11.4-201.fc19.x86_64 #1 SMP Thu Oct 10 14:11:18 UTC 2013 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux the kernel of fedora has the fedora version embedded in the filename as you can see :) will rerun this command after upgrading to fedora 20 (fedup is running atm, will report back afterwards if the kernel filename changed or not) – jascha Oct 16 '13 at 11:38
  • Linux hostname 3.11.4-301.fc20.x86_64 #1 SMP Thu Oct 10 15:09:17 UTC 2013 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux thats the output of uname -a after running fedup-cli to update to fedora 20. – jascha Oct 16 '13 at 17:35
5

These commands worked for Artik 10 :

  • cat /etc/fedora-release
  • cat /etc/issue
  • hostnamectl

and these others didn't :

  • lsb_release -a
  • uname -a
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2

On my installation of Fedora 25 (workstation) all of the distribution ID info was found in this file:

/usr/lib/os.release.d/os-release-workstation 

This included,

  • NAME=Fedora
  • VERSION="25 (Workstation Edition)"
  • ID=fedora
  • VERSION_ID=25
  • PRETTY_NAME="Fedora 25 (Workstation Edition)"
  • <...>
  • VARIANT="Workstation Edition"
  • VARIANT_ID=workstation
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0

uname -a works with my fc11

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