6

I'm trying to verify the signature of a JWT using the SubtleCrypto interface of the Web Crypto API.

My code will not verify the token signature while the debug tool at JWT.io will and I don't know why. Here is my verify function:

function verify (jwToken, jwKey) {
  const partialToken = jwToken.split('.').slice(0, 2).join('.')
  const signaturePart = jwToken.split('.')[2]
  const encoder = new TextEncoder()
  return window.crypto.subtle
    .importKey('jwk', jwKey, { 
         name: 'RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5', 
         hash: { name: 'SHA-256' } 
       }, false, ['verify'])
    .then(publicKey =>
      window.crypto.subtle.verify(
        { name: 'RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5' },
        publicKey,
        encoder.encode(atob(signaturePart)),
        encoder.encode(partialToken)
      ).then(isValid => alert(isValid ? 'Valid token' : 'Invalid token'))
    )
}

I expected that code to work and provide a positive verification of a properly signed JWT. Instead the example code fail to verify the signed token. The example fail in Chrome 71 for me.

I have also set up some tests using the example data from RFC 7520.

5
  • signaturePart and partialToken are base64url encoded. You need to decode them before using verify
    – pedrofb
    Commented Jan 6, 2019 at 16:36
  • @pedrofb You are right that the signaturePart need to be decoded. However partialToken (the JWS Signature Input) should not be decoded for the verification step per section 5. in RFC 7515. Commented Jan 7, 2019 at 15:01
  • My mistake. No need to decode partialToken. The signature is base64url encoded which is slighly different to base64. Before applying atob you need to replace + with - and / with _
    – pedrofb
    Commented Jan 7, 2019 at 15:44
  • Yep, that and using btoa() is really bad as it can't handle non-alphabet characters in the output, so the 'b' for binary in the functions name isn't really true. I switched to using rfc4648.js and it works perfectly. :) Commented Jan 8, 2019 at 0:22
  • 1
    You may want to answer your own question with the solution for future use
    – pedrofb
    Commented Jan 8, 2019 at 8:40

1 Answer 1

14

To verify a JWS with SubtleCrypto you need to be careful to encode and decode the data properly between binary and base64url representation. Unfortunately the standard implementation in the browser of btoa() and atob() are difficult to work with as they use "a Unicode string containing only characters in the range U+0000 to U+00FF, each representing a binary byte with values 0x00 to 0xFF respectively" as the representation of binary data.

A better solution to represent binary data in Javascript is to use ES6 object TypedArray and use a Javascript library (or write the encoder yourself) to convert them to base64url that honors RFC 4648.

Side note: The difference between base64 and base64url is the characters selected for value 62 and 63 in the standard, base64 encode them to + and / while base64url encode - and _.

An example of such a library in Javascript is rfc4648.js.

import { base64url } from 'rfc4648'

async function verify (jwsObject, jwKey) {
  const jwsSigningInput = jwsObject.split('.').slice(0, 2).join('.')
  const jwsSignature = jwsObject.split('.')[2]
  return window.crypto.subtle
    .importKey('jwk', jwKey, { 
         name: 'RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5', 
         hash: { name: 'SHA-256' } 
       }, false, ['verify'])
    .then(key=>
      window.crypto.subtle.verify(
        { name: 'RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5' },
        key,
        base64url.parse(jwsSignature, { loose: true }),
        new TextEncoder().encode(jwsSigningInput))
      ).then(isValid => alert(isValid ? 'Valid token' : 'Invalid token'))
    )
}
1
  • Works like a charm. Thanks a lot ! Commented Sep 17, 2019 at 19:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.