6

To speed up our development workflow we split the tests and run each part on multiple agents in parallel. However, compiling test sources seem to take most of the time for the testing steps.

To avoid this, we pre-compile the tests using sbt test:compile and build a docker image with compiled targets.

Later, this image is used in each agent to run the tests. However, it seems to recompile the tests and application sources even though the compiled classes exists.

Is there a way to make sbt use existing compiled targets?

Update: To give more context

The question strictly relates to scala and sbt (hence the sbt tag).

Our CI process is broken down in to multiple phases. Its roughly something like this.

  • stage 1: Use SBT to compile Scala project into java bitecode using sbt compile We compile the test sources in the same test using sbt test:compile The targes are bundled in a docker image and pushed to the remote repository,

  • stage 2: We use multiple agents to split and run tests in parallel. The tests run from the built docker image, so the environment is the same. However, running sbt test causes the project to recompile even through the compiled bitecode exists.

To make this clear, I basically want to compile on one machine and run the compiled test sources in another without re-compiling

Update

I don't think https://stackoverflow.com/a/37440714/8261 is the same problem because unlike it, I don't mount volumes or build on the host machine. Everything is compiled and run within docker but in two build stages. The file modified times and paths are retained the same because of this.

The debug output has something like this

Initial source changes: 
    removed:Set()
    added: Set()
    modified: Set()
Invalidated products: Set(/app/target/scala-2.12/classes/Class1.class, /app/target/scala-2.12/classes/graph/Class2.class, ...)
External API changes: API Changes: Set()
Modified binary dependencies: Set()
Initial directly invalidated classes: Set()

Sources indirectly invalidated by:
    product: Set(/app/Class4.scala, /app/Class5.scala, ...)
    binary dep: Set()
    external source: Set()
All initially invalidated classes: Set()
All initially invalidated sources:Set(/app/Class4.scala, /app/Class5.scala, ...)
Recompiling all 304 sources: invalidated sources (266) exceeded 50.0% of all sources
Compiling 302 Scala sources and 2 Java sources to /app/target/scala-2.12/classes ...

It has no Initial source changes, but products are invalidated.

Update: Minimal project to reproduce

I created a minimal sbt project to reproduce the issue. https://github.com/pulasthibandara/sbt-docker-recomplile

As you can see, nothing changes between the build stages, other than running in the second stage in a new step (new container).

  • To make this clear, I basically want to compile on one machine and run the compiled test sources in another without re-compiling. – Pulasthi Bandara Jan 7 '19 at 19:42
  • Your question lacks some details that would provide a proper answer. For example, can you take advantage of an intermediate language like the one that exists in Java or C# to provide some platform independence, or are you compiling to native code? If it is native code, do all of the platforms run the same processor? – Robert Harvey Jan 8 '19 at 1:12
  • Hi Robert, Our CI process is broken down in to multiple phases. Its roughly something like this. - stage 1: Use SBT to compile Scala project into java bitecode using sbt compile We compile the test sources in the same test using sbt test:compile The targes are bundled in a docker image and pushed to the remote repository, - stage 2: We use multiple agents to split and run tests in parallel. The tests run from the built docker image, so the environment is the same. However, running sbt test causes the project to recompile even through the compiled bitecode exists. – Pulasthi Bandara Jan 8 '19 at 3:27
  • Possible duplicate of Unnecessary recompilations by SBT – Rich Jan 8 '19 at 12:04
7

While https://stackoverflow.com/a/37440714/8261 pointed at the right direction, the underlying issue and the solution for this was different.

Issue

SBT seems to recompile everything when it's run on different stages of a docker build. This is because docker compresses images created in each stage, which strips out the millisecond portion of the lastModifiedDate from sources.

SBT depends on lastModifiedDate when determining if sources have changed, and since its different (the milliseconds part) the build triggers a full recompilation.

Solution

I solved the issue by setting SBT_OPTS env variable in the docker file like

ENV SBT_OPTS="${SBT_OPTS} -Dsbt.io.jdktimestamps=true"

The test project has been updated with this workaround.

| improve this answer | |
1

Using SBT:

I think there is already an answer to this here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/37440714/8261

It looks tricky to get exactly right. Good luck!

Avoiding SBT:

If the above approach is too difficult (i.e. getting sbt test to consider that your test classes do not need re-compiling), you could instead avoid using sbt but instead run your test suite using java directly.

If you can get sbt to log the java command that it is using to run your test suite (e.g. using debug logging), then you could run that command on your test runner agents directly, which would completely preclude sbt re-compiling things.

(You might need to write the java command into a script file, if the classpath is too long to pass as a command-line argument in your shell. I have previously had to do that for a large project.)

This would be a much hackier approach that the one above, but might be quicker to get working.

| improve this answer | |
  • I don't think stackoverflow.com/a/37440714/8261 is the same problem because unlike it, I don't mount volumes or build on the host machine. Everything is compiled and run within docker but in two build stages. The file modified times and paths are retained the same because of this. – Pulasthi Bandara Jan 9 '19 at 21:58
  • Clearly something differs between the build stage and the test-run stage, because SBT is detecting a difference and re-compiling your test sources. You will notice that if you run "sbt test:compile" and then "sbt test" one after the other on the same machine that it does not re-compile. The linked answer shows how to debug SBT's needs-recompile detection algorithm, although his Docker setup is a little different to yours, yes. – Rich Jan 10 '19 at 10:58
  • I created a minimal sbt project to reproduce the issue. github.com/pulasthibandara/sbt-docker-recomplile As you can see, nothing changes between the build stages, other than running in the second stage in a new step (new container). – Pulasthi Bandara Jan 10 '19 at 19:20
  • Thanks for the repro. I think my advice is the same as before: you will need to either 1) debug the SBT "needs recompiling" algo as per the linked question (which should be easier with this isolated repro case) or 2) invoke your test framework outside of SBT to avoid this issue. – Rich Jan 11 '19 at 10:17
  • 1
    Yes, your advice around the timestamps definitely helped. Thanks! I add the solution as an answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/54138157/7050167 – Pulasthi Bandara Jan 14 '19 at 3:49
0

A possible solution might be defining your own sbt task without dependencies or try to change the test task. For example you could create a task to run a JUnit runner if that was your testing framework. To define a task see this on Implementing Tasks.

You could even go as far as compiling sending the code and running the remotes from the same task as it is any scala code you want. From the sbt reference manual

You could be defining your own task, or you could be planning to redefine an existing task. Either way looks the same; use := to associate some code with the task key

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.