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Proc SQL Version=9.4. No windows functions to use.

There are client id, time period(month), amount and corresponding class.

client_id   data_period       amount    class 

1           200801            30000     2
2           200801            17000     1
3           200801            9000      1
1           200802            30000     2
2           200802            55555     2
3           200802            11000     2

Threshold amount = 20 000.

amount > 20k gives class = 2, amount <= 20k makes class = 1

client_id = 1, amount and class are the same for 200801 and 200802. client_id = 2, amount gets higher from 17k to 55.5k, class change is correct, from 1 to 2. client_id =3, amount changed within the same class 1 (<20K), but class changed incorrectly.

Desired result is

client_id   oldDate   newDate   AmtOld    AmtNew   ClassOld ClassNew  Good Bad
    2        200801   200802    17000     55555    1        2         1    0
    3        200801   200802     9000     11000    1        1         0    1

I tried to applied self join to get all the differences btw data periods, but there are too many rows in output. Data below is not from example above, real numbers.

client_id oldDate newDate AmtOld      AmtNew   ClassOld ClassNew

A001687463 200808 200802 -5613        1690386  I03      I04
A001687463 200807 200802 -5613        1690386  I03      I04
A001687463 200806 200802 -5613        1690386  I03      I04
A001687463 200805 200802 -5613        1690386  I03      I04 

PROC SQL;
   CREATE TABLE WORK.'Q'n AS 

   SELECT distinct

t1.client_id, t1.data_period as oldDate, t2.data_period as newDate, t1.amount as expAmtOld, t2.amount as expAmtNew, t1.class as classOld, t2.class as classNew

   FROM WORK.'E'n t1,  WORK.'E'n t2
   where
    t1.client_id = t2.client_id and 
    t1.amount <> t2.amount
    order by t1.client_id;
  • Don't try to use SQL to do sequential processing. Just use a data step. Also there is no way you are running SAS version 7.13. You are probably using some 9.x version. That 7.13 is probably just the version number from the Enterprise Guide GUI interface that is helping you submit code to SAS. – Tom Jan 7 at 13:25
  • 2
    The data in your example results does not match the data in your sample input. – Tom Jan 7 at 13:28
  • Hi Tom! it was just an example, data is not really match. – Vlad Tash Jan 7 at 13:29
  • proc sql Version=9.4 – Vlad Tash Jan 7 at 13:44
  • I cannot understand what your rule actually is. What does 20K have to do with the question? How do you know if something is correct? What time periods are you searching? What do you mean by consecutive time periods? A simple example of input and expected output would help clarify what you are talking about. – Tom Jan 7 at 14:02
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Do not attempt to do sequential processing using SQL. It is not built for that.

It should be easy to do in a data step. For example let's convert your printout into an actual SAS dataset so we have something to code with.

data have ;
  input client_id data_period amount class ;
cards;
1 200801 30000 2
2 200801 17000 1
3 200801 9000  1
1 200802 30000 2
2 200802 55555 2
3 200802 11000 2
;

And let's sort it by client and period.

proc sort data=have ;
  by client_id data_period ;
run;

Now just set the data and use the LAG() function to get the previous values. Not sure what you definition of GOOD and BAD were so I just created new class variables based on your rule of 20K.

data want ;
  set have ;
  by client_id;
  old_period = lag(data_period);
  old_class = lag(class);
  newclass = 1 + (amount > 20000) ;
  old_newclass = lag(newclass);
  if first.client_id then call missing(of old_:);
  bad = (class ne newclass) or (old_newclass ne old_class) ;
run;

So here are the results.

client_     data_                        old_      old_                  old_
   id      period    amount    class    period    class    newclass    newclass    bad

   1       200801     30000      2           .      .          2           .        0
   1       200802     30000      2      200801      2          2           2        0
   2       200801     17000      1           .      .          1           .        0
   2       200802     55555      2      200801      1          2           1        0
   3       200801      9000      1           .      .          1           .        0
   3       200802     11000      2      200801      1          1           1        1
  • Tom, thank you very much!!!! Unfortunately, can't like you or smth! :) – Vlad Tash Jan 7 at 15:10

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