See this example:

echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 36640
$a = str_repeat("Hello", 4242);
echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 57960
unset($a);
echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 36744

Can anyone explain why after un-setting the variable the memory usage does not return to 36640

  • No, if you are running script loop, it not always allocated max memory. – azat Mar 23 '11 at 15:27
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you do it twice the memory will stay at 36744...

echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 36640
$a = str_repeat("Hello", 4242);
echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 57960
unset($a);
echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 36744
$a = str_repeat("Hello", 4242);
unset($a);
echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // -> 36744
  • 2
    And what does that imply? – user395760 Mar 23 '11 at 15:27
  • It implies, that a long-running script is not "doomed" – KingCrunch Mar 23 '11 at 15:29
  • 1
    I have the same question: How is this answer useful? – Jon Mar 23 '11 at 15:30
  • 2
    It shows you how the interpreter works. There is a small overhead even after unsetting something. But when doing it again there is no more memory overhead. – powtac Mar 23 '11 at 15:31
  • The first conclusion is obvious already from the original question. The second simply does not follow. And certainly after unsetting a variable that has already been unset we would expect nothing to change. – Jon Mar 23 '11 at 15:37

Garbage collection is an expensive operation, even if there's only a single variable to unset. PHP won't run the collector each time you unset a var, as that'd waste a huge amount of CPU time.

PHP will only run the collector when it has to, as in when something wants more memory than is available.

What is your PHP version? The garbage collector in versions less than 5.3 is not really good. Please read this link to understand why:

Garbage collector

  • Ah I am using 5.2 – Chris Mar 23 '11 at 15:28
  • He's freeing up the memory himself. Where does the GC come into it? – Jon Mar 23 '11 at 15:29
  • Try with 5.3 and post the results – Jean-Philippe Leclerc Mar 23 '11 at 15:29
  • Philippe: powtac has clarified that there is an overhead, but I am interested to see the difference between 5.2 and 5.3 and your response suggests you use 5.3 - Without having to install PHP on this PC, and without have to reinstall PHP on my server (which I am not prepaired to do today) can you enlighten us of the improvements between the old and new versions of the PHP GC by posting the results of this script? – Chris Mar 23 '11 at 15:36
  • I will favorite this thread and come back later because I can't right now. – Jean-Philippe Leclerc Mar 23 '11 at 15:40

Just posting this.

I just ran it as a test for fun on PHP 5.3, the results are pretty clear to what powtac said:

630744
652280
630808
630808
652280
630808
630808
652280
630808
630808
652280
630808
630808
652280
630808
630808
652280
630808

So yea, after the initial unset it appears to be consistent throughout. Code tested with:

while (1) {
        echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 36640
        $a = str_repeat("Hello", 4242);
        echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 57960
        unset($a);
        echo memory_get_usage() . "\n"; // 36744
}

Caution: that is an infinite loop :)

I'll try to give one possible explanation, but I cannot claim that it is the right one.

PHP stores variables in a hash table (because of it's dynamic nature). This hash table consists of "buckets" (linked lists of elements). As the number of elements grows the number of buckets is increased, too (to be precise: The number of buckets is doubled as soon as the limit is reached).

Thus it could be the case, that the creation of your variable results in an increase of buckets. As these buckets aren't removed again, the memory usage stays.

But again: Only guessing.

  • I would think the same thing: the 'test' is to define $a = '' first and run the memory_get_usage() function before assigning the huge string. The funny thing is, when I run the original code, my third result is exactly the same as my first. – Narcissus Mar 23 '11 at 15:57

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