6

How can we access application context inside companion object in Android kotlin? I have a companion object inside an abstract class and I want to access context to read Shared Preferences, but I'm not able to get the context.

UPDATE: I'm working with this stuff in an Android library and also the class that I'm working in is abstract

4

please see this go to link

class MainApplication : Application() {

    init {
        instance = this
    }

    companion object {
        private var instance: MainApplication? = null

        fun applicationContext() : Context {
            return instance!!.applicationContext
        }
    }

    override fun onCreate() {
        super.onCreate()
        // initialize for any

        // Use ApplicationContext.
        // example: SharedPreferences etc...
        val context: Context = MainApplication.applicationContext()
    }
}
  • Thanks for the answer @Raifur-rahim. I already tried it and it didn't work because I'm working in an Android library, and this library is being used in more than one app, so adding this name MainApplication in AndroidManifest.xml causes merging problems. However, I found a solution and will post it. – Hafiz Hamza Jan 9 at 12:03
1

Extends Application class like this

import android.app.Application
import android.content.Context

class MyApplication : Application() {

override fun onCreate() {
super.onCreate()
MyApplication.appContext = applicationContext
 }

companion object {

lateinit  var appContext: Context

}
}

then get context like this

     val context = MyApplication.appContext
1

Actually I'm working inside an Android library and the class is abstract, so can't go with the already suggested solutions. However, I found way to do that.

  1. Creat a lateinit Context field inside companion object.
abstract class MyClass {

    companion object {

        private lateinit var context: Context

        fun setContext(con: Context) {
            context=con
        }
    }
}
  1. And then set it after the app has started
public class WelcomeActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_welcome);

        MyClass.Companion.setContext(this);
    }
}
0

There is a super cool article from the guys from Firebase explaining how their SDK gets hold of the context.

Basically my contentprovider looks like this:

/**
 * This content provider is only responsible to inject the application context into the common module.
 */
class ContextProvider : ContentProvider() {

    companion object {
        private val TAG = ContextProvider::class.java.simpleName
    }

    override fun onCreate(): Boolean {
        context?.let {
            Common.setContext(it)
            return true
        }
        Logger.e(TAG, "Context injection to common failed. Context is null! Check ContextProvider registration in the Manifest!")
        return false
    }

    override fun query(uri: Uri, projection: Array<String>?, selection: String?, selectionArgs: Array<String>?, sortOrder: String?): Cursor? = null

    override fun getType(uri: Uri): String? = null

    override fun insert(uri: Uri, values: ContentValues?): Uri? = null

    override fun delete(uri: Uri, selection: String?, selectionArgs: Array<String>?): Int = 0

    override fun update(uri: Uri, values: ContentValues?, selection: String?, selectionArgs: Array<String>?): Int = 0
}

And the Common object, which I treat like an sibling of any Application class looks like this:

/**
 * Partially working like an Application class by holding the appContext which makes it accessible inside this module.
 */
@SuppressLint("StaticFieldLeak")
object Common {
    /**
     * App appContext
     */
    @Volatile
    lateinit var appContext: Context

    var isStoreVersion: Boolean = false

    fun setContext(context: Context) {
        appContext = context
    }
}

As you can see I also enriched the Common object with a flag to store if the current build is a store version or not. Mainly because the BuildConfig of the app module is also not available in a module or library.

Don't forget to add the ContentProvider to the AndroidManifest of your library within the <application> tag

<provider android:name=".util.ContextProvider"
          android:authorities="${applicationId}.common.util.contextprovider"
          android:exported="false" />
  • Thanks for the answer @WarrenFaith. I already tried this and have also posted this approach as an answer. – Hafiz Hamza Jan 9 at 13:51
  • I have seen that but there are multiple down sides: 1. you actually have to "init" your library by hand somewhere while your ContentProvider would do that automatically 2. lateinit can lead to runtime crashes if the initialization wasn't done or done too late (and your library was called somewhere else first). Anyway if your solution is working and the disadvantages are manageable for you, great! – WarrenFaith Jan 10 at 12:15
0
class Test { 

    companion object {
        lateinit var sharedPreferences: SharedPreferences

        fun init(context: Context) {
            // to prevent multiple initialization
            if (!Companion::sharedPreferences.isInitialized) {
                sharedPreferences = context.getSharedPreferences("preference_name", Context.MODE_PRIVATE)   
            }
        }
    }
}
  • make sure to call Test.init(context) before using Test. sharedPreferences usually in Application oncreate method – Ganesh Jogam May 11 at 14:20

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