338

As far as I can tell, web workers need to be written in a separate JavaScript file, and called like this:

new Worker('longrunning.js')

I'm using the closure compiler to combine and minify all my JavaScript source code, and I'd rather not have to have my workers in separate files for distribution. Is there some way to do this?

new Worker(function() {
    //Long-running work here
});

Given that first-class functions are so crucial to JavaScript, why does the standard way to do background work have to load a whole other JavaScript file from the web server?

5

29 Answers 29

269

http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/workers/basics/#toc-inlineworkers

What if you want to create your worker script on the fly, or create a self-contained page without having to create separate worker files? With Blob(), you can "inline" your worker in the same HTML file as your main logic by creating a URL handle to the worker code as a string


Full example of BLOB inline worker:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<script id="worker1" type="javascript/worker">
  // This script won't be parsed by JS engines because its type is javascript/worker.
  self.onmessage = function(e) {
    self.postMessage('msg from worker');
  };
  // Rest of your worker code goes here.
</script>
<script>
  var blob = new Blob([
    document.querySelector('#worker1').textContent
  ], { type: "text/javascript" })

  // Note: window.webkitURL.createObjectURL() in Chrome 10+.
  var worker = new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(blob));
  worker.onmessage = function(e) {
    console.log("Received: " + e.data);
  }
  worker.postMessage("hello"); // Start the worker.
</script>

12
187

The html5rocks solution of embedding the web worker code in HTML is fairly horrible.
And a blob of escaped JavaScript-as-a-string is no better, not least because it complicates work-flow (Closure compiler can't operate on strings).

Personally I really like the toString methods, but @dan-man THAT regex!

My preferred approach:

// Build a worker from an anonymous function body
var blobURL = URL.createObjectURL( new Blob([ '(',

function(){
    //Long-running work here
}.toString(),

')()' ], { type: 'application/javascript' } ) ),

worker = new Worker( blobURL );

// Won't be needing this anymore
URL.revokeObjectURL( blobURL );

Support is the intersection of these three tables:

This won't work for a SharedWorker however, because the URL must be an exact match, even if the optional 'name' parameter matches. For a SharedWorker, you'll need a separate JavaScript file.


2015 update - The ServiceWorker singularity arrives

Now there's an even more powerful way of solving this problem. Again, store the worker code as a function, (rather than a static string) and convert using .toString(), then insert the code into CacheStorage under a static URL of your choice.

// Post code from window to ServiceWorker...
navigator.serviceWorker.controller.postMessage(
 [ '/my_workers/worker1.js', '(' + workerFunction1.toString() + ')()' ]
);

// Insert via ServiceWorker.onmessage. Or directly once window.caches is exposed
caches.open( 'myCache' ).then( function( cache )
{
 cache.put( '/my_workers/worker1.js',
  new Response( workerScript, { headers: {'content-type':'application/javascript'}})
 );
});

There are two possible fall-backs. ObjectURL as above, or more seamlessly, put a real JavaScript file at /my_workers/worker1.js

Advantages of this approach are:

  1. SharedWorkers can also be supported.
  2. Tabs can share a single cached copy at a fixed address. The blob approach proliferates random objectURLs for every tab.
7
  • 5
    What would browser compatibility look like on this solution?
    – Ben Dilts
    Oct 9, 2013 at 14:26
  • 1
    Can you elaborate on this solution, how does it work? What is the worker1.js? Is it a seperate js file? I am trying to use this but unable to make it work. Specifically I am trying to make it work for a SharedWorker
    – Yehuda
    Mar 15, 2016 at 18:14
  • 1
    If only you could wrap it up in a useful function!
    – mjs
    Sep 27, 2016 at 7:39
  • @ Ben Dilts: Browser compatibility would look like just running your code through babel: babeljs.io/repl
    – Jack G
    Mar 17, 2017 at 18:13
  • 1
    I like this answer (the first one), but it does not allow any imports or imporScripts statements. How could we possibly combine this method with importing other scripts or modules into the worker? Oct 22, 2020 at 5:59
38

You can create a single JavaScript file that is aware of its execution context and can act as both a parent script and a worker. Let's start off with a basic structure for a file like this:

(function(global) {
    var is_worker = !this.document;
    var script_path = is_worker ? null : (function() {
        // append random number and time to ID
        var id = (Math.random()+''+(+new Date)).substring(2);
        document.write('<script id="wts' + id + '"></script>');
        return document.getElementById('wts' + id).
            previousSibling.src;
    })();
    function msg_parent(e) {
        // event handler for parent -> worker messages
    }
    function msg_worker(e) {
        // event handler for worker -> parent messages
    }
    function new_worker() {
        var w = new Worker(script_path);
        w.addEventListener('message', msg_worker, false);
        return w;
    }
    if (is_worker)
        global.addEventListener('message', msg_parent, false);

    // put the rest of your library here
    // to spawn a worker, use new_worker()
})(this);

As you can see, the script contains all code for both the parent's and the worker's point of view, checking if its own individual instance is a worker with !document. The somewhat unwieldy script_path computation is used to accurately calculate the script's path relative to the parent page, as the path supplied to new Worker is relative to the parent page, not the script.

6
  • 4
    Your site appears to have vanished; do you have a new URL?
    – BrianFreud
    Jul 14, 2012 at 2:00
  • 1
    This is an interesting approach. FWIW, I feature-detect Web Workers by checking for the presence of "self" (the Web Worker global object) vs "window".
    – pwnall
    May 24, 2013 at 9:52
  • I've been looking into how PapaParse handles Web Workers and they seem to take this approach github.com/mholt/PapaParse
    – JP DeVries
    Jun 21, 2015 at 16:51
  • I think testing using 'typeof importScripts !== null' can tell if script is running in worker scope.
    – MeTTeO
    Sep 15, 2015 at 17:39
  • 1
    I dont understand what the previousSibling is from the script-element. Can someone explain me?
    – Teemoh
    Jun 5, 2017 at 17:33
29

Using the Blob method, how about this for a worker factory:

var BuildWorker = function(foo){
   var str = foo.toString()
             .match(/^\s*function\s*\(\s*\)\s*\{(([\s\S](?!\}$))*[\s\S])/)[1];
   return  new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(
                      new Blob([str],{type:'text/javascript'})));
}

So you could use it like this...

var myWorker = BuildWorker(function(){
   //first line of worker
   self.onmessage(){....};
   //last line of worker
});

EDIT:

I've just extended this idea further to make it easier to do cross-thread communication: bridged-worker.js.

EDIT 2:

The above link is to a gist I created. Someone else later turned it into an actual repo.

1
  • Can you say more about what that regex does and why? Since it has "function" in it, I guess it won't work on an arrow function? Any other restrictions?
    – Don Hatch
    Nov 15, 2021 at 8:25
12

Web workers operate in entirely separate contexts as individual Program's.

This means that code cannot be moved from one context to another in object form, as they would then be able to reference objects via closures belonging to the other context.
This is especially crucial as ECMAScript is designed to be a single threaded language, and since web workers operate in separate threads, you would then have the risk of non-thread-safe operations being performed.

This again means that web workers need to be initialized with code in source form.

The spec from WHATWG says

If the origin of the resulting absolute URL is not the same as the origin of the entry script, then throw a SECURITY_ERR exception.

Thus, scripts must be external files with the same scheme as the original page: you can't load a script from a data: URL or javascript: URL, and an https: page couldn't start workers using scripts with http: URLs.

but unfortunately it doesn't really explain why one couldn't have allowed passing a string with source code to the constructor.

9

Recent answer (2018)

You can use Greenlet:

Move an async function into its own thread. A simplified single-function version of Workerize.

Example:

import greenlet from 'greenlet'

const getName = greenlet(async username => {
  const url = `https://api.github.com/users/${username}`
  const res = await fetch(url)
  const profile = await res.json()
  return profile.name
})

console.log(await getName('developit'))
8

a better to read way for a inline worker..

    var worker_fn = function(e) 
    {
        self.postMessage('msg from worker');            
    };

    var blob = new Blob(["onmessage ="+worker_fn.toString()], { type: "text/javascript" });

    var worker = new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(blob));
    worker.onmessage = function(e) 
    {
       alert(e.data);
    };
    worker.postMessage("start"); 
1
  • What I did was that I created a function with all the worker code, pass that function toString(), extrack the body and then put that in a Blob. Check at the last answer, I have an example Jan 26, 2018 at 2:53
5

Taking Adria's response and putting it in a copy-pastable function which works with current Chrome and FF but not IE10 (worker from blob causes a security error).

var newWorker = function (funcObj) {
    // Build a worker from an anonymous function body
    var blobURL = URL.createObjectURL(new Blob(
        ['(', funcObj.toString(), ')()'],
        {type: 'application/javascript'}
     ));

    var worker = new Worker(blobURL);

    // Won't be needing this anymore
    URL.revokeObjectURL(blobURL);

    return worker;
}

And here's a working example http://jsfiddle.net/ubershmekel/YYzvr/

3

Depending on your use case you can use something like

task.js Simplified interface for getting CPU intensive code to run on all cores (node.js, and web)

A example would be

function blocking (exampleArgument) {
    // block thread
}

// turn blocking pure function into a worker task
const blockingAsync = task.wrap(blocking);

// run task on a autoscaling worker pool
blockingAsync('exampleArgumentValue').then(result => {
    // do something with result
});
3

A simple promisified version, Function#callAsWorker, that takes a thisArg and arguments (just like call), and returns a promise:

Function.prototype.callAsWorker = function (...args) {
    return new Promise( (resolve, reject) => {
        const code = `self.onmessage = e => self.postMessage((${this.toString()}).call(...e.data));`,
            blob = new Blob([code], { type: "text/javascript" }),
            worker = new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(blob));
        worker.onmessage = e => (resolve(e.data), worker.terminate());
        worker.onerror = e => (reject(e.message), worker.terminate());
        worker.postMessage(args);
    });
}

// Demo
function add(...nums) {
    return nums.reduce( (a,b) => a+b );
}
// Let the worker execute the above function, with the specified arguments
add.callAsWorker(null, 1, 2, 3).then(function (result) {
    console.log('result: ', result);
});

2
2

Take a look at the vkThread plugin. With htis plugin you can take any function in your main code and execute it in a thread (web worker). So, you don't need to create a special "web-worker file".

http://www.eslinstructor.net/vkthread/

--Vadim

2

So I think we have another cool option for this now, thanks to template literals in ES6. That allows us to dispense with the extra worker function (and its weird scope) and just write the code that's intended for the worker as multiline text, much like the case where we were using to store text, but without actually needing a document or DOM to do that in. Example:

const workerScript = `
self.addEventListener('message', function(e) {
  var data = e.data;
  console.log('worker recieved: ',data);
  self.postMessage('worker added! :'+ addOne(data.value));
  self.close();//kills the worker
}, false);
`;

Here's a gist of the rest of that approach.

Note that we can pull in any extra function dependencies we want into the worker just by collecting them into an array and running .toString on each of them to reduce them down into strings as well (should work as long as they are function declarations) and then just prepending that to the script string. That way we don't have to importScripts that we might already have bundled into the scope of the code we're writing.

The only real downside to this particular version is that linters won't be able to lint the service worker code (since it's just a string), which is an advantage for the "separate worker function approach."

1

I think the better way to do this is using a Blob object, below you can see a simple example.

// create a Blob object with a worker code
var blob = new Blob(["onmessage = function(e) { postMessage('msg from worker'); }"]);

// Obtain a blob URL reference to our worker 'file'.
var blobURL = window.URL.createObjectURL(blob);

// create a Worker
var worker = new Worker(blobURL);
worker.onmessage = function(e) {
  console.log(e.data);
};
worker.postMessage("Send some Data"); 
1

Try to use jThread. https://github.com/cheprasov/jThread

// You can use simple calling like this
jThread(
    function(arr){
        //... some code for Worker
        return arr;
    }
    ,function(arr){
        //... done code
    }
)( [1,2,3,4,5,6,7] ); // some params
1

here console:

var worker=new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(new Blob([function(){
  //Long-running work here
  postMessage('done');
}.toString().split('\n').slice(1,-1).join('\n')],{type:'text/javascript'})));

worker.addEventListener('message',function(event){
  console.log(event.data);
});
1

https://developer.mozilla.org/es/docs/Web/Guide/Performance/Using_web_workers

    // Syntax: asyncEval(code[, listener])

var asyncEval = (function () {

  var aListeners = [], oParser = new Worker("data:text/javascript;charset=US-ASCII,onmessage%20%3D%20function%20%28oEvent%29%20%7B%0A%09postMessage%28%7B%0A%09%09%22id%22%3A%20oEvent.data.id%2C%0A%09%09%22evaluated%22%3A%20eval%28oEvent.data.code%29%0A%09%7D%29%3B%0A%7D");

  oParser.onmessage = function (oEvent) {
    if (aListeners[oEvent.data.id]) { aListeners[oEvent.data.id](oEvent.data.evaluated); }
    delete aListeners[oEvent.data.id];
  };


  return function (sCode, fListener) {
    aListeners.push(fListener || null);
    oParser.postMessage({
      "id": aListeners.length - 1,
      "code": sCode
    });
  };

})();
1

Use my tiny plugin https://github.com/zevero/worker-create

var worker_url = Worker.createURL(function(e){
  self.postMessage('Example post from Worker'); //your code here
});
var worker = new Worker(worker_url);
1

This is just an addition to above - I have a nice templates for testing web workers in jsFiddle. Rather than Blob it uses jsFiddles ?js api:

function workerFN() {
  self.onmessage = function(e) {
    switch(e.data.name) {
      case "" : 
      break;
      default:
        console.error("Unknown message:", e.data.name);
    }
  }
}
// This is a trick to generate real worker script that is loaded from server
var url = "/echo/js/?js="+encodeURIComponent("("+workerFN.toString()+")()");
var worker = new Worker(url);
worker.addEventListener("message", function(e) {
  switch(e.data.name) {
    case "" : 
    break;
    default:
      console.error("Unknown message:", e.data.name);
  }
})

Normal web worker and shared worker templates are available.

0
1

I discovered that CodePen currently does not syntax-highlight inline <script> tags that are not type="text/javascript" (or which have no type attribute).

So I devised a similar but slightly different solution using labeled blocks with break, which is the only way you can bail from a <script> tag without creating a wrapper function (which is unnecessary).

<!DOCTYPE html>
<script id="worker1">
  worker: { // Labeled block wrapper

    if (typeof window === 'object') break worker; // Bail if we're not a Worker

    self.onmessage = function(e) {
      self.postMessage('msg from worker');
    };
    // Rest of your worker code goes here.
  }
</script>
<script>
  var blob = new Blob([
    document.querySelector('#worker1').textContent
  ], { type: "text/javascript" })

  // Note: window.webkitURL.createObjectURL() in Chrome 10+.
  var worker = new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(blob));
  worker.onmessage = function(e) {
    console.log("Received: " + e.data);
  }
  worker.postMessage("hello"); // Start the worker.
</script>

1

You can use web workers in same javascript fie using inline webworkers.

The below article will address you to easily understand the webworkers and their limitations and debugging of webworkers.

Mastering in webworkers

0
1

my take on it:

function BuildWorker(fn){
   var str = fn.toString().match(/^[^{]+{([\s\S]+)}\s*$/m)[1];
   return  new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(
                new Blob([str],{type:'text/javascript'})));
}

function createAsyncWorker(fn){
    
    // asyncworker=createAsyncWorker(function(){
    //     importScripts('my_otherscript.js');
    //     self.onmessage = function([arg1,arg2]) {
    //         self.postMessage('msg from worker');
    //     };
    // })
    // await asyncworker.postMessage('arg1','value')
    // await asyncworker.postMessage('arg1','value')
    // asyncworker.worker.terminate()
    
    var worker = BuildWorker(fn);

    function postMessage(...message){
        let external={}, promise= new Promise((resolve,reject)=>{external.resolve=resolve;external.reject=reject;})
        worker.onmessage = function(message){ external.resolve(message.data)};
        worker.postMessage(message); // Start the worker.
        return promise;
    }

    return {worker,postMessage};
}

usage example:

autoarima = createAsyncWorker(function(){
    importScripts("https://127.0.0.1:11000/arima.js")
    
    self.onmessage=(message)=>{
        let [action,arg1,arg2]=message.data
        if(action=='load')
        {
            ARIMAPromise.then(ARIMA1 => {
                ARIMA=ARIMA1
                autoarima = new ARIMA({ auto: true });
                //   const ts = Array(10).fill(0).map((_, i) => i + Math.random() / 5)
                //   const arima = new ARIMA({ p: 2, d: 1, q: 2, P: 0, D: 0, Q: 0, S: 0, verbose: false }).train(ts)
                //   const [pred, errors] = arima.predict(10)
                postMessage('ok')
            });
        }
        if(action=='fit')
        {
            autoarima.fit(arg1)
            postMessage('ok')
        }
        if(action=='predict')
        {
            postMessage(autoarima.predict(arg1,arg2)) 
        }
    };
})
autoarima.terminate=function(){  this.worker.terminate(); }
autoarima.load=async function(...args){return await this.postMessage('load',...args)}
autoarima.fit=async function(...args){return await this.postMessage('fit',...args)}
autoarima.predict=async function(...args){return await this.postMessage('predict',...args)}

await autoarima.load()
await autoarima.fit(b_values)
await autoarima.predict(1)
2
  • Are you able to scale arima to large datasets this way to produce a composite model, or are the webworkers necessarily producing different prediction models?
    – Joe Lapp
    Apr 16 at 16:43
  • 1
    In my situation I needed the Webworker to be able to load large wasm library, and to run it. I used it on about 2k points, scaling was not an issue.. i ended up not using the arima, but the async code with another model.. i used this async code for connivance to put the thread code near the main code. i used it in the browser. – this code is like created an object that lives in a webworker. with async api. while it was living it had same traind instance in it. – Apr 17 at 20:15
0

I use code like this, you can define your onmessage as a function other than plain text, so the editor can highlight your code and jshint works.

const worker = createWorker();

createWorker() {
    const scriptContent = getWorkerScript();
    const blob = new Blob([
        scriptContent,
    ], {
        type: "text/javascipt"
    });
    const worker = new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(blob));
    return worker;
}

getWorkerScript() {
    const script = {
        onmessage: function (e) {
            console.log(e);
            let result = "Hello " + e.data
            postMessage(result);
        }
    };
    let content = "";
    for (let prop in script){
        content += `${prop}=${script[prop].toString()}`;
    }
    return content;
}

1
  • Look at my answer, I just did that but I wrote a whole class for abstracting how to pass callbacks Jan 26, 2018 at 6:01
0

Yes, it is possible, I did it using Blob files and passing a callback

I'll show you what a class I wrote does and how it manages the execution of callbacks in the background.

First you instantiate the GenericWebWorker with whatever data you'd like to pass to callback that'll be executing in the Web Worker, that includes functions you want to use, in this case a number, a date and a function called blocker

var worker = new GenericWebWorker(100, new Date(), blocker)

This blocker function will execute an infinite while for n miliseconds

function blocker (ms) {
    var now = new Date().getTime();
    while(true) {
        if (new Date().getTime() > now +ms)
            return;
    }   
}

and then you use it like this

worker.exec((num, date, fnBlocker) => {
    /*Everithing here does not block the main thread
      and this callback has access to the number, date and the blocker */
    fnBlocker(10000) //All of this run in backgrownd
    return num*10

}).then(d => console.log(d)) //Print 1000

Now, time to see the magic in the example below

/*https://github.com/fercarvo/GenericWebWorker*/
class GenericWebWorker {
    constructor(...ags) {
        this.args = ags.map(a => (typeof a == 'function') ? {type:'fn', fn:a.toString()} : a)
    }

    async exec(cb) {
        var wk_string = this.worker.toString();
        wk_string = wk_string.substring(wk_string.indexOf('{') + 1, wk_string.lastIndexOf('}'));            
        var wk_link = window.URL.createObjectURL( new Blob([ wk_string ]) );
        var wk = new Worker(wk_link);

        wk.postMessage({ callback: cb.toString(), args: this.args });
 
        var resultado = await new Promise((next, error) => {
            wk.onmessage = e => (e.data && e.data.error) ? error(e.data.error) : next(e.data);
            wk.onerror = e => error(e.message);
        })

        wk.terminate(); window.URL.revokeObjectURL(wk_link);
        return resultado
    }

    async parallel(arr, cb) {
        var res = [...arr].map(it => new GenericWebWorker(it, ...this.args).exec(cb))
        var all = await Promise.all(res)
        return all
    }

    worker() {
        onmessage = async function (e) {
            try {                
                var cb = new Function(`return ${e.data.callback}`)();
                var args = e.data.args.map(p => (p.type == 'fn') ? new Function(`return ${p.fn}`)() : p);

                try {
                    var result = await cb.apply(this, args); //If it is a promise or async function
                    return postMessage(result)

                } catch (e) { throw new Error(`CallbackError: ${e}`) }
            } catch (e) { postMessage({error: e.message}) }
        }
    }
}


function blocker (ms) {
    var now = new Date().getTime();
    while(true) {
        if (new Date().getTime() > now +ms)
            return;
    }   
}

setInterval(()=> console.log("Not blocked " + Math.random()), 1000)

console.log("\n\nstarting blocking code in Worker\n\n")

var worker = new GenericWebWorker(100, new Date(), blocker)

worker.exec((num, date, fnBlocker) => {
    fnBlocker(7000) //All of this run in backgrownd
    return num*10    
})
.then(d => console.log(`\n\nEnd of blocking code: result ${d}\n\n`)) //Print 1000

0

You can place the contents of your worker.js file inside backticks (which allows a multiline string constant) and create the worker from a blob like this:

var workerScript = `
    self.onmessage = function(e) {
        self.postMessage('message from worker');
    };
    // rest of worker code goes here
`;

var worker =
    new Worker(createObjectURL(new Blob([workerScript], { type: "text/javascript" })));

This is handy if for whatever reason you don't want to have separate script tags for the worker.

0

Another solution is just to wrap the Worker in a function, then creating a blob invoking the function like so:

     function workerCode() {
        self.onmessage = function (e) {
          console.log("Got message from parent", e.data);
        };
        setTimeout(() => {
          self.postMessage("Message From Worker");
        }, 2000);
      }

      let blob = new Blob([
        "(" + workerCode.toString() + ")()"
      ], {type: "text/javascript"});

      // Note: window.webkitURL.createObjectURL() in Chrome 10+.
      let worker = new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(blob));
      worker.onmessage = function (e) {
        console.log("Received: " + e.data);
      };
      worker.postMessage("hello"); // Start the worker.
0

One-liner for running functions in workers:

const FunctionalWorker = fn => new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(new Blob(["(" + fn.toString() + ")()"], {type: "text/javascript"})));

Example usage:

let fn = FunctionalWorker(() => {
    self.postMessage("hi");
});
fn.onmessage = msg => {
    console.log(msg);
};
0

there have been a few answers, but here is another inline version.

note: "self" argument is purely cosmetic for linting purposes, actual worker code starts after first brace, self is as normal

inlineWorker (
   "hello world",// initial message to send to worker
   function(self){
// inline worker code.
  self.onmessage = function (e) {
  
    self.postMessage("thinking...");
     for (var i=0;i<100000000;i++) {
         var r = Math.random();
     }
     self.postMessage(e.data.toUpperCase());
  }

},function(e){
  // optional message handler
  document.getElementById("log").innerHTML= "from worker:"+e.data;
});



function inlineWorker (msg,fn,onMsg) {
    var 
    w=window,
    U=!!w.webkitURL?w.webkitURL:w.URL,
    src=fn.toString(),
    s=src.indexOf('{'),
    e=src.lastIndexOf('}'),
    worker = new Worker(U.createObjectURL(
        new Blob([ src.substring(s+1,e-1) ], { type: "text/javascript" })
    ));
    if (typeof onMsg==="function") {
        worker.addEventListener("message",onMsg);
    }
    if (msg) {
       worker.postMessage(msg); 
    }
    return worker;
}
<div id="log"></div>

0

I liked the answer that ifbamoq gave but was not able to comment because of stack overflow's stupid points policy. Therefor I'll give an example that shows some intensive work being done - and how it does not lock the main thread.

All without running into CORS problems with the null origin - if you're like me and like double-clicking the html files and treating them like little programs. :-)

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Worker example: One-core computation</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>The highest prime number discovered so far is: <div id="result"></div></p>
    </body>

    <script>
        // let worker = new Worker('WebWorker.js');  // lets skip this to avoid null origin issues

        let WorkerFn = (event) =>
        {
            let isPrime = false;

            for (let n = 2; n <= 1_000_000; n++)
            {
                isPrime = true;

                for(let i = 2; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i++)
                    if (n % i == 0)
                        isPrime = false;   // If you can get thru all this shit and survive, ur prime!

                if (isPrime)
                    postMessage(n);
            }
        }

        let worker = new Worker(window.URL.createObjectURL(new Blob(["(" + WorkerFn.toString() + ")()"], {type: "text/javascript"})));

        worker.onmessage = (event) =>
        {
            result.innerHTML = event.data;
        }

    </script>
</html>

-2

This is a bit off topic answer, but ... you may not require the use of web workers to deal with long jobs on browsers.

Let's suppose you want to run several time an heavy computing (like you would do over an array) :

const heavyFct = () => {let i = 0; while(i<1e8) {++i}}

for (let i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
  heavyFct();
}

This should freeze your browser.

To avoid this we can rely on setTimeout this way:

const desync = (i = 0) => {
  if (i >= 100) {return}
  heavyFct();
  setTimeout(() => desync(i + 1), 0);
}
desync();

Now you have your heavy computing running without freezing you computer

3
  • I got some down-votes, but without any comments. I'm interested to know why this would be a bad solution ... since i use it ^^
    – Poyoman
    Jan 25, 2021 at 15:10
  • Your answer does not answer the question. He asked for running a Worker without a separate file. Where is the Worker in your answer? Your setTimeout() just runs the heavyFct async but still inside the main thread and takes CPU resources from it. One of the core features of a Worker is a dedicated CPU thread. Even if code execution continues in your example async, the main thread will struggle at some point if calling desync n times.
    – Exodus 4D
    Aug 14, 2021 at 14:40
  • @Exodus4D i wanted to share this solution, since Workers are also used in order to avoid a webpage to freeze. This was the point of my answer. But anyway i'm off topic :D Thank you for precising downvote's reason ;)
    – Poyoman
    Aug 15, 2021 at 10:20

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