1

I have two overloaded methods

double Sum(double n1, double n2)
{
     return n1 + n2;
}

float Sum(float n1, float n2)
{
     return n1 + n2;
}

When I call Sum(5.5, 5.5), the method with double return type gets called.

My question is why the method with double return type is called, and why not the method with float return type? How is the compiler deciding which method should be called?

2
  • Since 5.5 is a double literal, the version with doubles is called.
    – Eljay
    Commented Jan 8, 2019 at 12:32
  • Its more efficient, if you want to call the other, affix your parameters with f, also you must be assigning the return to a double?
    – SPlatten
    Commented Jan 8, 2019 at 12:37

1 Answer 1

7

Because, floating-point literals such as 5.5 have the type double in C++ as default. That's why, when you pass a double literal to an overloaded function, it is going to call the version of that function which accepts the double typed parameters.

If you want to override this default behaviour, you need to be using suffix notations such as f to let the compiler know which type does literal have. As an example, you need to be passing Sum(5.5f, 5.5f) instead of Sum(5.5, 5.5) to avoid default behaviour.

3
  • You mean to say, if we have to pass float, then we have to explicitly convert the number to float ? right ? @HimanshuAhuja Commented Jan 8, 2019 at 11:15
  • 5
    You need to be using suffix f such as 5.5f to let the compiler know that it is a float typed literal. Commented Jan 8, 2019 at 11:17
  • 1
    @WaleedNaveed -- if you want to pass a float you have to pass a float. 5.5 is not a float. 5.5f is a float, and static_cast<float>(5.5) is a float, and after float f = 5.5;, f is a float. Commented Jan 8, 2019 at 13:55

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