0

I want to write a program that communicates with intelligent meters (electricity, heat, etc.) over Meter-Bus protocol. I have an M-Bus <-> RS232 converter and RS232 <-> USB.

When I test my Python script with heat meter, by sending it a command it responds me with a long but correct frame, then if I query it again soon after I get only partial frame respond. Waiting around 30s helps to get a whole frame correctly. This partial respond is always the same. Heat meter respond frames

But with electricity meter it's always the same, although the whole, correct frame would be shorter than in case of heat meter, I always get only the same part of it (little over half of bytes and never the beginning). Electricity meter respond frames

There's also command that initializes slave - slave responds with '\xE5', even though I see Rx diode blinking I cant catch this single byte.

What I have tried:

  1. I tried reading certainly more bytes than could be in my buffer like ser.read(500)

  2. Tried using ser.inwaiting but it would return 0 until I used time.sleep(1) prior to it

  3. Loading chunks of bytes from pySerial inWaiting returns incorrect number of bytes

  4. Manipulating xonxoff parameter and timeout.

Everything with no effect.

import serial
import time

def ser_to_mbus():
    ser = serial.Serial(
        port='COM4', 
        baudrate=2400, 
        bytesize=serial.EIGHTBITS,
        parity=serial.PARITY_EVEN,
        stopbits=serial.STOPBITS_ONE,
        timeout=2,
        #write_timeout=1,
        xonxoff=False,
        rtscts=False,
        dsrdtr=False,
        #inter_byte_timeout=0.01,
        )
    # Should receive a hex response '\xE5' with command below.
    #to_send = b'\x68\x0B\x0B\x68\x73\xFD\x52\x84\x11\x10\x00\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\x63\x16'
    #to_send = b'\x10\x7B\x01\x7C\x16' # heat meter request frame
    to_send = b'\x10\x7B\xFD\x78\x16' # electricity meter request frame
    ser.write(to_send)
    ser.close()

def mbus_to_ser():
    ser = serial.Serial(
        port='COM4', 
        baudrate=2400, 
        bytesize=serial.EIGHTBITS,
        parity=serial.PARITY_EVEN,
        stopbits=serial.STOPBITS_ONE,
        timeout=1,
        #write_timeout=1,
        xonxoff=1,
        rtscts=False,
        dsrdtr=False,
        #inter_byte_timeout=0.2,
        )
    time.sleep(1) # Otherwise ser.in_waiting is empty. 
    buffer_size = ser.in_waiting
    frame = ser.read(buffer_size)
    return frame

ser_to_mbus()
frame = mbus_to_ser()
print(frame)

I've been monitoring M-Bus frames with EMU and my serial port with Serial Port Monitor. Frames sent by EMU and received are always correct, the same with Serial Monitor. If I use my code to send and receive frames, Serial Monitor gets same results as I did in my terminal - it sees wrong, 'sliced', frames.

Devices respond only after they receive correct requests (I see an Rx diode blinking).

I don't know if there is a problem with threading, or with a buffer or maybe Python script is not fast enough to catch all bytes from a buffer?

  • Your program probably drops data because it's improperly constructed, i.e. it opens, initializes, and closes the serial port for a write, and then opens, initializes, and closes the serial port again for a read. This repeated sequence of opening, initializing, and closing of the serial port is horribly inefficient and completely unnecessary with proper program design. The program should open and initialize the serial port just once for the duration/life of the program. – sawdust Jan 8 at 19:56
  • That was exactly a reason behind all of this. Thank you :) – notonlyonlynot Jan 9 at 8:05

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.