58
template <typename CRTP>
struct Pre {
    CRTP & operator++();
};

template <typename CRTP>
struct Post {
    CRTP operator++(int);
};

struct Derived
    : Pre<Derived>
    , Post<Derived>
{};

int main() {
    Derived d;
    d++;
    ++d;
}

I get these errors from GCC:

<source>: In function 'int main()':
<source>:18:10: error: request for member 'operator++' is ambiguous
        d++;
        ^~
<source>:8:14: note: candidates are: CRTP Post<CRTP>::operator++(int) [with CRTP = Derived]
        CRTP operator++(int);
            ^~~~~~~~
<source>:3:16: note:                 CRTP& Pre<CRTP>::operator++() [with CRTP = Derived]
        CRTP & operator++();
                ^~~~~~~~
<source>:19:11: error: request for member 'operator++' is ambiguous
        ++d;
        ^
<source>:8:14: note: candidates are: CRTP Post<CRTP>::operator++(int) [with CRTP = Derived]
        CRTP operator++(int);
            ^~~~~~~~
<source>:3:16: note:                 CRTP& Pre<CRTP>::operator++() [with CRTP = Derived]
        CRTP & operator++();
                ^~~~~~~~

Pre-decrement and post-decrement operators cause similar errors. No such errors with Clang. Any ideas what could be wrong or how to work around this?

  • 6
    using Pre::operator++; using Post::operator++; works, but I guess it defeats the purpose of your CRTP... – Quentin Jan 8 at 12:11
  • 1
    fwiw also with supplying the implementation and also without crtp gcc reports the error – user463035818 Jan 8 at 12:14
  • 3
    @Quentin Puts using declaration in a helper template PrePost : Pre, Post – felix Jan 8 at 12:16
  • 8
    For me behavior of gcc seems to be correct. Invocation of function operator ++ should not compile because it is not clear to which function does the name operator ++ refer to. – VTT Jan 8 at 12:17
  • 2
    It's not a defect in the sense that the language itself has an inconsistency that needs resolution. It's only a design choice with unfortunate consequences, a colloquial defect, if you were. – StoryTeller Jan 8 at 13:07
62

Name lookup must occur first. In this case for the name operator++.

[basic.lookup] (emphasis mine)

1 The name lookup rules apply uniformly to all names (including typedef-names ([dcl.typedef]), namespace-names ([basic.namespace]), and class-names ([class.name])) wherever the grammar allows such names in the context discussed by a particular rule. Name lookup associates the use of a name with a declaration ([basic.def]) of that name. Name lookup shall find an unambiguous declaration for the name (see [class.member.lookup]). Name lookup may associate more than one declaration with a name if it finds the name to be a function name; the declarations are said to form a set of overloaded functions ([over.load]). Overload resolution ([over.match]) takes place after name lookup has succeeded. The access rules (Clause [class.access]) are considered only once name lookup and function overload resolution (if applicable) have succeeded. Only after name lookup, function overload resolution (if applicable) and access checking have succeeded are the attributes introduced by the name's declaration used further in expression processing (Clause [expr]).

And only if the lookup is unambiguous, will overload resolution proceed. In this case, the name is found in the scope of two different classes, and so an ambiguity is present even prior to overload resolution.

[class.member.lookup]

8 If the name of an overloaded function is unambiguously found, overloading resolution ([over.match]) also takes place before access control. Ambiguities can often be resolved by qualifying a name with its class name. [ Example:

struct A {
  int f();
};

struct B {
  int f();
};

struct C : A, B {
  int f() { return A::f() + B::f(); }
};

— end example ]

The example pretty much summarizes the rather long lookup rules in the previous paragraphs of [class.member.lookup]. There is an ambiguity in your code. GCC is correct to report it.


As for working around this, people in comments already presented the ideas for a workaround. Add a helper CRTP class

template <class CRTP>
struct PrePost
    : Pre<CRTP>
    , Post<CRTP>
{
    using Pre<CRTP>::operator++;
    using Post<CRTP>::operator++;
};

struct Derived : PrePost<Derived> {};

The name is now found in the scope of a single class, and names both overloads. Lookup is successful, and overload resolution may proceed.

  • 12
    Fwiw, MS VS2015 (19.00.24215.1) complains about the ambiguity via IntelliNonsense, but then still compiles the code to success (with no warnings or errors) and executes the hoped-for members at run-time. – WhozCraig Jan 8 at 12:24
  • 4
    @StoryTeller Indeed, for a "normal" method f() vs. f(int), clang++ complains about: "error: member 'f' found in multiple base classes of different types" and adds "note: member found by ambiguous name lookup". GCC is actually more consistent here. – Arne Vogel Jan 8 at 12:30
  • 3
    Ok. So it appears that this is sort-of a defect in the language (that d++ and ++d refer to the same operator/function name), which gcc faithfully implements, while clang and VS17 appear to implement what the user obviously intended (even w/o warning). – Walter Jan 8 at 12:33
  • 1
    @Walter - Pretty much. Had we taken a path like, say, Python with regards to overloading, it'd had probably been easier to work with all around. Alas, something else was choesn. – StoryTeller Jan 8 at 12:41
  • 2
    @PiotrNycz - Other than being called by a special syntax, overloaded operators are regular functions. As a matter of fact, they can also be called just like regular functions. d.operator++(0) will cause this ambiguity, as should d++, since the two are exactly equivalent. – StoryTeller Jan 8 at 20:24

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