1

I have a dictionary which I want to map using fluent mapping, and for some properties of MyDto class, I need to add normalizer.

new CreateIndexDescriptor("indexName")
.Mappings(ms => ms.Map<Entity>(e => new PutMappingDescriptor<Entity>()
 .AutoMap()
 .Properties(o => o.Object<IDictionary<string, MyDto>>(
  m => m.AutoMap().Name(f => f.SomeProperty))

my class definitions:

class MyEntity {
...
Dictionary<string, MyDto> SomeProperty {get;set;}
...
}
class MyDto {
...
string Name {get;set;}
...
}

1 Answer 1

4

It's not possible to add this as an explicit mapping, but it is through a dynamic template.

Let's look at why it's not possible through explicit mapping. Consider how Dictionary<string, MyDto> SomeProperty will serialize to JSON. For example

client.IndexDocument(new MyEntity 
{
    SomeProperty = new Dictionary<string, UserQuery.MyDto>
    {
        { "field_1", new MyDto { Name = "foo" } },
        { "field_2", new MyDto { Name = "bar" } }
    }
});

by default will serialize as

{
  "someProperty": {
    "field_1": {
      "name": "foo"
    },
    "field_2": {
      "name": "bar"
    }
  }
}

If we wanted to apply an explicit mapping to MyDto.Name, we would need to know at the point of mapping, all of the dictionary keys that will be used.

You can however, configure a dynamic template that will map any MyDto.Name as a keyword type, using path_match

private static void Main()
{
    var defaultIndex = "my_index";
    var pool = new SingleNodeConnectionPool(new Uri("http://localhost:9200"));

    var settings = new ConnectionSettings(pool)
        .DefaultIndex(defaultIndex);

    var client = new ElasticClient(settings);

    if (client.IndexExists(defaultIndex).Exists)
        client.DeleteIndex(defaultIndex);

    var createIndexResponse = client.CreateIndex(defaultIndex, c => c
        .Settings(s => s
            .NumberOfShards(1)
            .NumberOfReplicas(0)
        )
        .Mappings(m => m
            .Map<MyEntity>(mm => mm
                .AutoMap()
                .DynamicTemplates(dt => dt
                    .DynamicTemplate("MyDto", dtd => dtd
                        .PathMatch("someProperty.*.name")
                        .Mapping(dm => dm
                            .Keyword(k => k)
                        )
                    )
                )
                .Properties(p => p
                    .Object<Dictionary<string, MyDto>>(o => o
                        .Name(n => n.SomeProperty)
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    );

    var indexResponse = client.Index(new MyEntity 
    {
        SomeProperty = new Dictionary<string, UserQuery.MyDto>
        {
            { "field_1", new MyDto { Name = "foo" } },
            { "field_2", new MyDto { Name = "bar" } }
        }
    }, i => i.Refresh(Refresh.WaitFor));

    var mappingResponse = client.GetMapping<MyEntity>();
}

public class MyEntity
{
    public Dictionary<string, MyDto> SomeProperty { get; set; }
}

public class MyDto
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

The mapping response confirms that someProperty.field_1.name and someProperty.field_2.name are mapped as keyword

{
  "my_index" : {
    "mappings" : {
      "myentity" : {
        "dynamic_templates" : [
          {
            "MyDto" : {
              "path_match" : "someProperty.*.name",
              "mapping" : {
                "type" : "keyword"
              }
            }
          }
        ],
        "properties" : {
          "someProperty" : {
            "properties" : {
              "field_1" : {
                "properties" : {
                  "name" : {
                    "type" : "keyword"
                  }
                }
              },
              "field_2" : {
                "properties" : {
                  "name" : {
                    "type" : "keyword"
                  }
                }
              }
            }
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

An aside on mapping explosion

You may want to consider adding a property to MyDto to hold the dictionary key, and use a List<MyDto> or similar collection mapped as a nested datatype, rather than Dictionary<string, MyDto>, if users can add any arbitrary key names they wish. With a high cardinality of dictionary keys, you run the risk of a mapping explosion and hitting the maximum number of fields soft limit and a lot of sparse fields, which can affect performance. With a List<MyDto> property type, you would not have this issue and can still query on the key field, at the expense of the trade-off that a List<MyDto> may be less optimal for your application code than a Dictionary<string, MyDto>. Something to consider :)

4
  • awesome explanation
    – NaDeR Star
    Jan 8, 2019 at 22:19
  • Thanks for your response Russ, so if I use dynamic template, can I add normalizer to properties of MyDto? or still not possible? Jan 9, 2019 at 1:46
  • and it seems in general, using a dictionary is not recommended? despite it's the closest data type to a json document? Jan 9, 2019 at 1:47
  • @HosseinNassiri you can add a normalizer to the .Keyword(k => k.Normalizer("foo")) mapping, and anything else you need in the dynamic template mapping. A dictionary might be the nearest CLR type to a JSON document, but it is not relevant to how Elasticsearch mapping will work when given a dictionary. You can use a dictionary if you want to, but I caution that high cardinality of dictionary keys can lead to performance problems, which can be mitigated by adopting a different mapping structure. If the set of keys is known, then using a specific type is another option.
    – Russ Cam
    Jan 9, 2019 at 2:26

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