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In this talk I learned how to create variables with scriptable objects, creating classes like FloatVariable, DoubleVariable, StringVariable and others. But, in the same talk, the guy said that he uses a more dynamic variable system, that prevents creating several classes to handle all variable types.

Using the first system, I had a C# script called ImageFillSetter, that given two float variables and a Image script, it returns the division of the two variables to the fillAmount variable of the image.

But, when I get a Double Variable, and I'd like to set a progress bar with this value, I need to create another script called ImageFillSetterDouble, and put in these variables. And if I needed to create one with Integers? Every time I create a script like this, I will need to create two duplicates to handle the other number variable types? With this dynamic variable system, this problem should be solved, but I have no idea how to start/create this system.

The code looks like this:

[CreateAssetMenu(menuName="Variable/Float")]
public class FloatVariable : ScriptableObject, ISerializationCallbackReceiver
{
    public float initialValue;
    [NonSerialized] 
    public float value;

    public void OnAfterDeserialize()
    {
        value = initialValue;
    }

    public void OnBeforeSerialize() { }
}

What I want is something like this (Totally hypothetical, I know that this doesn't works)

[CreateAssetMenu(menuName="Variable")]
public class Variable : ScriptableObject, ISerializationCallbackReceiver
{
    public var initialValue;
    [NonSerialized] 
    public var value;

    public void OnAfterDeserialize()
    {
        value = initialValue;
    }

    public void OnBeforeSerialize() { }
}
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Have a look at Generics

Have one abstract class like

public abstract class ValueAsset<T> : ScriptableObject
{
    public T value;

    // Add your methods

    // Here some more examples also using the T value. They might also be abstract but they don't have to be

    // return a T
    public T GetValue()
    {
        return value;
    }

    // or pass a T
    public void SetValue(T input)
    {
        value = input;
    }
}

This class you will never instantiate but now derive multiple implementations from it e.g.

[CreateAssetMenu(fileName = "new int", menuName = "ValueAssets/int")]
public class IntValue : ValueAsset<int>
{
    // Maybe constructors here or additional fields and methods
}

[CreateAssetMenu(fileName = "new float", menuName = "ValueAssets/float")]
public class FloatValue : ValueAsset<float>
{
    // Maybe constructors here or additional fields
}

You can also have multiple generic values like

public abstract class OtherExample<TKey, TValue> : ScriptableObject
{
    // Note that this is just an example
    // Dictionary is not serializable
    public Dictionary<TKey, TValue> values = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();

    public void AddPair(TKey key, TVakue value)
    {
        values.Add(key, value);
    }
}

And implement something like

public OneImplementation : OtherExample<string, GameObject>
{
    //...
}

The same way this can be used for reference values (components, GameObject etc)


So for IntValue the method GetValue will return an int and SetValue will take an int as parameter. The same way they take and return a float in FloatValue.


Doing the same thing with an ImageFillSetter<T> you can than make your method abstract and implement different behaviours for different T values (like e.g. a different parsing etc)

Note: I don't know why exactly but in the past I noticed that

public ValueAsset<T> valueAsset;

will not be serialized in the inspector even if later implemented so you have to implement the field with the correct type in the implementation instead. You also still could override it on runtime but you can skip the whole FetchValue part if you don't need it and anyway use valueReference instead - just added it for completeness.

public abstract class ImageFillSettet<T> : MonoBehaviour
{
    // Will not appear in the Inspector
    public ValueAsset<T> ValueAsset;

    // Override this in implementation
    protected abstract void FetchValue();

    // Use it for Initializing the value
    private void Awake ()
    {
        FetchValue();
    }

    public abstract void SetFill();   
}

Than later

public class ImageFillSetterFloat : ImageFillSetter<float>
{
    // Show in the inspector
    [SerializeField] private FloatValue valueReference;

    // Provide the reference to the base class
    protected override void Fetch value()
    {
        valueAsset = valueReference;
    }

    public override void SetFill()
    {
        // Use valueReference for something
    }
}
  • Thank you very much! Very understandable and complete answer. Thanks :) – João Santana Jan 10 at 15:29
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I know there is an accepted answer that works, but I feel that the usage of ScriptableObject variables as described in the linked video was misinterpreted.

I think you would be better off making your FloatVariable independent of the calculation.

Let's say the calculation is for player health and your fill value would be calculated by currentHealth/maxHealth.

public class PlayerHealth: MonoBehaviour
{
    [SerializeField] private FloatVariable floatReference;
    [SerializeField] private float maxHealth;
    [SerializeField] private float currentHealth;

    void Update()
    {
        this.floatReference.value = currentHealth/maxHealth;
    }
}


public class ImageFillSetter: MonoBehaviour
{
     [SerializeField] private FloatVariable floatReference;
     [SerializeField] private Image imageReference;

     void Update()
    {
        this.imageReference.fill = this.floatReference.value;
    }
}

Or let's say that player health is stored as double:

public class PlayerHealth: MonoBehaviour
{
    [SerializeField] private FloatVariable floatReference;
    [SerializeField] private double maxHealth;
    [SerializeField] private double currentHealth;

    void Update()
    {
        this.floatReference.value = (float)(currentHealth/maxHealth);
    }
}

Now let's say that you add an input field where the fill value can be entered as a percentage string (like '76'):

public class FillInput: MonoBehaviour
{
    [SerializeField] private FloatVariable floatReference;
    [SerializeField] private Input input;

    void Update()
    {
        if(Input.GetKeyDown(KeyCode.Enter))
        {
            this.floatReference.value = float.Parse(input.text)/100f;
        }
    }
}

The ImageFillSetter will 'observe' the FloatVariable without being aware of how that float was calculated.

This way you only ever have to have one ImageFillSetter that can be used for any image and any data source, while having 1 or more ways of altering the fill that does not require any changes to be made to ImageFillSetter.

For example, let's say that you want to use the same approach to indicate async level load progress:

public class FillInput: MonoBehaviour
{
    [SerializeField] private FloatVariable floatReference;
    private AsyncOperation loadOperation;

    void LoadLevelAsync(string levelName)
    {
        this.loadOperation = SceneManager.LoadLevelAsync(levelName, LoadSceneMode.Additive);
    }

    void Update()
    {
        this.floatReference.value = this.loadOperation?.progress ?? 0;
    }
}

This will work without making any other changes as long as your ImageFillSetter references the same FloatVariable.

Think of the FloatVariable (or whichever primitive you have eg. DoubleVariable) as a value stored in a database. Anyone can read the value and anyone can save a new value. It would be strange to store all possible calculations for the value in the database instead of doing the calculation and just storing the answer.

This does not change the fact that you need Scriptable implementations for each primitive:

  • FloatVariable
  • DoubleVariable
  • StringVariable
  • BoolVariable
  • etc

but you will only need one of each as demonstrated in the first section of derHugo's answer.

  • Wow, thank you very much for this explanation. I was trying to create variables to each global value in the game, and I forgot about variables that may store the result of a calculation. Super glad :) – João Santana Jan 11 at 13:29

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