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I am trying to compare two numberic value in a Macro. But I keep getting the following message:

ERROR: A character operand was found in the %EVAL function or %IF condition where a numeric operand is required. The condition was: 0.2
ERROR: The %TO value of the %DO I loop is invalid.
ERROR: A character operand was found in the %EVAL function or %IF condition where a numeric operand is required. The condition was: 0.05
ERROR: The %BY value of the %DO I loop is invalid.
ERROR: The macro FAIL will stop executing.

My code is the following:

%macro fail;
      %do i=0 %to 0.2 %by 0.05;
          data failcrs;
              set fail;
              if f_p>=input(&i, 8.) then output;
          run;
      %end;
%mend failcrs;

f_p is a numeric variable.

What is wrong with my code? Please help.

Thank you so much!

  • Getting this working is easy, but the code is illogical and likely not what you want. If it's a test case I guess it's fine. – Reeza Jan 9 at 21:29
  • I don't see where you are comparing macro variables? If you want to operate on floating point values in macro code you need to use %sysevalf() instead of the implicit %eval() function call that macro statements normally use. %if %sysevalf( &I >= 0.2) %then ... – Tom Jan 9 at 22:52
  • Thank you Tom! I got it. Another macro function. – Lin Jan 9 at 23:07
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Conditional tests in macro code (%if, %until, %while, etc) use %eval() macro function that only does integer arithmetic. This includes the increments and tests done in a %do-%to-%by loop.

To use floating point arithmetic you need to use the %sysvalf() macro function.

You could code your own increments to the loop counter.

%let i=0;
%do %while( %sysevalf( &I <= 0.2 ) );
   ...
   %let i=%sysevalf(&i + 0.05);
%end;

Or make the loop counter an integer and use another macro variable to hold the fraction.

%do j=0 %to 20 %by 5 ;
   %let i=%sysevalf(&j/100);
   ...
%end;
  • Thank you Tom! I see. – Lin Jan 10 at 15:29
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You have a couple of issues. Macro loops work better with integers, but an easy workaround is a %DO %UNTIL loop instead.

  1. Name on %MEND is different than on %MACRO
  2. Invalid values for %DO %I loop.
  3. Non-unique data set name, which means the output overwrites itself.

    *fake data to work with;  
    data fail;
        do f_p=0 to 0.2 by 0.01;
            output;
        end;
    run;
    
    %macro fail;
        %let i=0;
          %do %until(&i = 0.2); /*2*/
              data failcrs_%sysevalf(&i*100); /*3*/
                  set fail;
                  if f_p>=&i then output;
              run;
              %let i = %sysevalf(&i + 0.05);
          %end;
    %mend fail; /*3*/
    
    *test macro;
    %fail;
    

The numbers in the comments align with the issues identified.

  • Thank you so much Reeza! I always have a thought that any macro variable's value is characteristic, even it is assigned with a numeric value. hmm, where I got such idea? – Lin Jan 9 at 22:30
  • I just think of how the generated code will look like and if that makes sense. In general, macro variables are text, not numeric or character if that makes it more clear. – Reeza Jan 9 at 22:32
  • I have to say: no, I am still confusing. So text is not a character? You want to see the complete macro code? I can paste it here to let you see. Maybe you can pick out other issues. – Lin Jan 9 at 22:51
  • That's really too long of a question to be answered in comments and has no relation to your original question. The code gerenated was input(0.01, 8.) and that is invalid beccuase 0.01 is already numeric. If you wanted to make that valid, you could also fix it by having it generate input("0.01", 8.), which would technically be valid. That wasn't the part that was causing the error anyways, it was the DO loop, that's just a different issue that I noticed as well. – Reeza Jan 9 at 23:01
  • That would have been input("&i", 8.). – Reeza Jan 9 at 23:04
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Try using best32. But why do you want to loop, when your dataset is overwritten for each loop. Please check log for each of step below. As at @Reeza in comments explains below you even do not an input statement Options mprint;

   /* do this*/
    %macro fail;
   %let i =15;
    data failcrs;
          set sashelp.class;

          if age lt input(&i, best32.)  then output;
      run;
   %mend fail;

  %fail

   /* dataset overwritten every time to finally pick up 15 as value check in the log*/
   %macro fail1;
   %do i = 1 %to 15;
    data failcrs1;
          set sashelp.class;

          if age lt input(i, best32.) then output;
      run;
  %end;
 %mend fail1;

%fail1
  • I is numeric, you don't need INPUT() at all.... – Reeza Jan 9 at 21:32
  • Changed the answer, but your comment itself is the answer. You are right @Reeza – Kiran Jan 9 at 21:36
  • The issue is with the decimal values in the do loop, that's what generates the error. Not sure if they're valid in a %DO loop. – Reeza Jan 9 at 21:41
  • Thank you all so much! I got it. So the decimal is the problem. Now the code works. I will do some counts and merge after output, it is long, so I didn't paste the rest codes here. – Lin Jan 9 at 22:27
0
%macro fail;
        %let i=0;
        %do %until(&i = 0.2);
            data failcrs; 
                set crse_grade_dist_fail;
                if f_p>=&i then output;
                run;

        proc sql;
            create table count_failclass as
            select strm, count(class_nbr) as numfclass_%sysevalf(&i*100)
            from failcrs
            group by strm;
        quit;

        proc sql;
            create table failfaculty as
            select strm, instructor_id, instructor, count(class_nbr) as numfclass
            from failcrs
            group by strm, instructor_id, instructor;
        quit;

        proc sql;
            create table count_failfaculty as
            select strm, count(instructor) as numffaculty_%sysevalf(&i*100)
            from failfaculty
        group by strm;
        quit;

        data count_class_faculty;
            set count_class_faculty;
            set count_failclass;
            set count_failfaculty;
        run;

        %let i = %sysevalf(&i + 0.05);
    %end;
%mend fail;

Good thing is my data doesn't have f_p=0, all of them is greater than zero. Because I only want to count failed courses.

  • 1
    Don't use equality tests for floating point numbers because of the inability to exactly represent decimal fractions in binary numbers. %do %until(%sysevalf(&i >= 0.2)); – Tom Jan 10 at 0:46
  • great point Tom – Kiran Jan 10 at 2:56
  • Tom, got you! I learned some tricks. Thank you so much again! – Lin Jan 10 at 15:30
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Documentation is written to be read, a simple search for "SAS 9.4 Macro Do" should explain it all -- start, stop and by are integers -- integers in the sense that whatever macro source expression in their place evaluates implicitly or explicitly to an integer at need time.

The macro you coded is a little strange. It will generate multiple data steps that all overwrite the same dataset. You might want to concentrate on not writing macro code first, and move to it when the need to have repetitive boilerplate code submitted. Writing good macro code means you have to think in terms of "will this generate appropriate source code and what side effect will these macro statements have in their resolution scope"

%DO, Iterative Statement

Syntax

%DO macro-variable=start %TO stop <%BY increment>;

  text and macro language statements

%END;

Required Arguments

macro-variable

  • names a macro variable or a text expression that generates a macro variable name. Its value functions as an index that determines the number of times the %DO loop iterates. If the macro variable specified as the index does not exist, the macro processor creates it in the local symbol table.

  • You can change the value of the index variable during processing. For example, using conditional processing to set the value of the index variable beyond the stop value when a certain condition is met ends processing of the loop.

startstop

  • specify integers or macro expressions that generate integers to control the number of times the portion of the macro between the iterative %DO and %END statements is processed.

  • The first time the %DO group iterates, macro-variable is equal to start. As processing continues, the value of macro-variable changes by the value of increment until the value of macro-variable is outside the range of integers included by start and stop.

increment

  • specifies an integer (other than 0) or a macro expression that generates an integer to be added to the value of the index variable in each iteration of the loop. By default, increment is 1. Increment is evaluated before the first iteration of the loop. Therefore, you cannot change it as the loop iterates.

  • Thank you so much Richard!! – Lin Jan 10 at 15:24

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