4

This question already has an answer here:

Let's say i have a list of keys

key_lst = ["key1", "key2", "key3"]

and i have a value

value = "my_value"

and an example dict my_dict with this structure

{
"key1": {
    "key2": {
        "key3": "some_value"
        }
    },
}

How can i dynamically assign the new value in variable value to my_dict["key1"]["key2"]["key3"] by going thru / looping over my key_lst?

I can not just say my_dict["key1"]["key2"]["key3"] = value since the keys and the number of keys is changing. I always get the keys (the path that i have to save the value at) in a list...

I'm using Python 3.7

marked as duplicate by dawg python Jan 10 at 23:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Use a for loop? – Julien Jan 10 at 22:46
  • what is the output you want? – Jundullah Jan 10 at 22:58
  • @Julien: did you try it? It's not as easy as you think :-) – Endogen Jan 10 at 23:01
  • @Jundullah: I want to save the value in the dict – Endogen Jan 10 at 23:01
  • @Endogen it's not as hard as you think either :) – Julien Jan 10 at 23:04
6

Predefined dictionary structure: functools.reduce

You can define a function using functools.reduce to apply getitem repeatedly and then set a supplied value:

from functools import reduce
from operator import getitem

def set_nested_item(dataDict, mapList, val):
    """Set item in nested dictionary"""
    reduce(getitem, mapList[:-1], dataDict)[mapList[-1]] = val
    return dataDict

key_lst = ["key1", "key2", "key3"]
value = "my_value"
d = {"key1": {"key2": {"key3": "some_value"}}}

d = set_nested_item(d, key_lst, value)

print(d)
# {'key1': {'key2': {'key3': 'my_value'}}}

Note operator.getitem is used to access dict.__getitem__, or its more commonly used syntactic sugar dict[]. In this instance, functools.reduce calls getitem recursively on dataDict, successively using each value in mapList[:-1] as an argument. With [:-1], we intentionally leave out the last value, so we can use __setitem__ via dict[key] = value for the final key.


Arbitrary dictionary nesting: collections.defaultdict

If you wish to add items at arbitrary branches not yet been defined, you can construct a defaultdict. For this, you can first defaultify your regular dictionary input, then use set_nested_item as before:

from collections import defaultdict

def dd_rec():
    return defaultdict(dd_rec)

def defaultify(d):
    if not isinstance(d, dict):
        return d
    return defaultdict(dd_rec, {k: defaultify(v) for k, v in d.items()})

dd = defaultify(d)

key_lst = ["key1", "key2", "key5", "key6"]
value = "my_value2"
dd = set_nested_item(dd, key_lst, value)

print(dd)

# defaultdict(<function __main__.<lambda>>,
#             {'key1': defaultdict(<function __main__.<lambda>>,
#                          {'key2': defaultdict(<function __main__.<lambda>>,
#                                       {'key3': 'my_value',
#                                        'key5': defaultdict(<function __main__.<lambda>>,
#                                                    {'key6': 'my_value2'})})})})
  • This is a pretty cool answer. Mind explaining a bit more on your set_nested_item function for me? – hqkhan Jan 10 at 23:12
  • 2
    But this assumes the particular structure already exists. What about setting new values? You will need a defaultdict, right? This cannot handle KeyErrors as it is. – cs95 Jan 10 at 23:13
  • @hqkhan, Added an explanation. – jpp Jan 10 at 23:15
  • @coldspeed, Agreed, this doesn't handle KeyError. That said, not sure whether this is relevant for OP's requirements. For example, it's conceivable that the dictionary structure is given and you only want to set values; hence KeyError is what you want. – jpp Jan 10 at 23:16
  • JESUS CHRIST! That's a nice solution. Dict structure is actually given and i would expect a KeyError if the key is not in there. BTW: Not a requirement but this is more than three times faster than @coldspeed's answer. This is the one, thanks. – Endogen Jan 10 at 23:39
5

You can iteratively build/access levels using setdefault in a loop:

d = {}
d2 = d
for k in key_lst[:-1]:
    d2 = d2.setdefault(k, {})

d2[key_lst[-1]] = value
print(d)
# {'key1': {'key2': {'key3': 'my_value'}}}

d is the reference to your dictionary, and d2 is a throw-away reference that accesses inner levels at each iteration.

  • Yes works perfectly. Awesome. – webDev Jan 10 at 23:24
0

I guess you can loop through your keys like this :

d = {}
a = d
for i in key_lst: 
    a[i] = {}
    if i == key_lst[-1]:
        a[i] = value
    else:
        a = a[i]
print(d)
# {'key1': {'key2': {'key3': 'my_value'}}}

Edit: I guess I misread the question and answered as if the dictionnary wasn't already existing. jpp answer is pretty neat otherwise I guess!

0

This is what you want:

def update(d, key_lst , val):
    for k in key_lst[:-1]:
        if k not in d:
            d[k] = {}
        d = d[k]
    d[key_lst[-1]] = val

d = {}

update(d, list('qwer'), 0)
# d = {'q': {'w': {'e': {'r': 0}}}}

You could use defaultdict too, it's neat in a sense but prints rather ugly...:

from collections import defaultdict

nest = lambda: defaultdict(nest)
d = nest()

def update(d, key_lst , val):
    for k in key_lst[:-1]:
        d = d[k]
    d[key_lst[-1]] = val

update(d, 'qwer', 0)
0
key_lst = ["key1", "key2", "key3"]
my_dict={
"key1": {
    "key2": {
        "key3": "some_value"
        }
    },
}

val=my_dict
#loop gets second to last key in chain(path) and assigns it to val
for x in key_lst[:-1]:
    val=val[x]
#now we can update value of last key, cause dictionary key is passed by reference
val[key_lst[-1]]="new value"

print (my_dict)

#{'key1': {'key2': {'key3': 'new value'}}}
  • @Julien what is half broken? – Mehrdad Dowlatabadi Jan 10 at 23:23
  • @Julien thats right thanks, but i can't see possibility of non existing key in question – Mehrdad Dowlatabadi Jan 10 at 23:25
  • I take that back. OP has clarified the dict structure is given in a comment to another answer... (wasn't the downvoter in the first place but upvoted to balance out :) – Julien Jan 11 at 0:03
  • 1
    @Julien thanks, i was thinking to delete my answer,you know i'm new and i was late to submit this answer and didn't know there's similar answer. next time i'll submit carefully :) – Mehrdad Dowlatabadi Jan 11 at 0:15
  • 1
    Please add some comments around it explaining why this is an answer, and/or what problem this code solves. – Kraang Prime Jan 11 at 3:57

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