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I have a method, it returns me the return view do ajax operation, how I can test it to check the right data return or not?

[HttpPost]
    public ActionResult ViewPlayers(string teamName)
    {
        if (teamName.Contains("Все игроки"))
        {
            return PartialView(playerRepository.Players.ToList());
        }
        else
        {

            if (teamName != string.Empty)// send team-logo image path
            {
                Team findingTeam = teamRepository.Teams.First(t => t.Name.Contains(teamName));
                ViewBag.TeamLogoPath = findingTeam.Path;
            }
            List<Player> allTeam = playerRepository.Players.Where(t => t.Team.Name.Contains(teamName)).ToList();

            return PartialView(allTeam);
        }
    }

enter image description here

when I choose a team in the drop-down list I take string name to post after that,

1) if "Все игроки" i take a table with all players

2) else I find the player in this team.

how check-in test return it all player or certain players of the team?

  • You pass in the arguments to get the desired condition making sure to mock the dependencies to behave as expected. After invoking the action under test you check the model of the action result and assert that it is the expected data. – Nkosi Jan 11 at 11:43
3

Have you tried simply calling that method and checking the response? The nice thing about MVC frameworks is that you don't need the entire framework just to use a controller. Other components in the stack will take the ActionResult and render it into HTML.

PartialView returns a PartialViewResult whose Model property contains the model passed to PartialView.

You should be able to write a unit test that creates a controller, calls the action and checks the result's model, eg :

[Test]
public void viewPlayers_Returns_One()
{
    var myController=new MyController(...);
    var resultView=(PartialViewResult)myController.ViewPlayers("SomeName");
    var players= (List<Player>)resultView.Model;

    Assert.That(players, Has.Exactly(1).Items);
}

Mocking

The tricky part now is injecting the repository. Given the LINQ-like syntax I'd assume playerRepository is an EF repository injected through the constructor or a repository object that exposes EF entities through the Players property.

Mocking EF is shown in multiple SO questions and the EF documentation.

EF Core makes mocking a lot easier through its in-memory database provider. EF Core isn't tied to the .NET runtime which means it can be used in Full framework applications too. Testing with InMemory in the docs contains a more detailed example. There's also an example that shows using SQLite for more advanced scenarios

Being lazy, I'll assume the repository is a class that implements an interface :

public interface IPlayersRepository
{
    public IQueryable<Player> Players {get;}
}

It's easy to create a mock class that takes a list or array or players and exposes it through Players :

class MockPlayers
{
    public IQueryable<Player> Players {get; private set;}

    public MockPlayers(Player[] players)
    {
        Players=players.AsQueryable();
    }
}

That's simple enough that it doesn't even need a mocking framework. After that, the test becomes :

[Test]
public void viewPlayers_Returns_One()
{
    var players=new[]{new Player{Name="SomeName"},new Player{Name="Other Name"}};
    var mockRepo=new MockPlayers(players);
    var myController=new MyController(mockRepo);
    ...
}

Moq would be useful for a more complex interface. Using Moq, you'd probably write :

var players = new[]{...};
var mockRepo=new Mock<IPlayersRepository>();
mockRepo.SetupGet(x => x.Players).Returns(players.AsQueryable());

EF Core

If you inject an EF Core context, eg PlayersContext, you can configure it to use the in-memory provider :

//setup
var options = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<PlayersContext>()
    .UseInMemoryDatabase(databaseName: "Players Test")
    .Options;

using(var ctx = new PlayersContext(options))
{
    ctx.Players.Add(new Player{...});
    ctx.SaveChanges();
}

//Execute
using(var ctx = new PlayersContext(options))
{
    var myController=new MyController(ctx);
    ...
}

"Classic" EF

Things are a bit more involved and require mocking the DbSet and some of its methods. Adapting the documentation's query scenario would look like this:

//Setup 
...
var data = players.AsQueryable();

var mockSet = new Mock<DbSet<Player>>();
mockSet.As<IQueryable<Player>>().Setup(m => m.Provider).Returns(data.Provider);
mockSet.As<IQueryable<Player>>().Setup(m => m.Expression).Returns(data.Expression);
mockSet.As<IQueryable<Player>>().Setup(m => m.ElementType).Returns(data.ElementType);
mockSet.As<IQueryable<Player>>().Setup(m => m.GetEnumerator()).Returns(data.GetEnumerator());

var mockContext = new Mock<PlayerContext>();
mockContext.Setup(c => c.Blogs).Returns(mockSet.Object);

//Execute
var myController=new MyController(mockContext.Object);
...

Did I mention EF Core can be used in Full Framework applications?

  • in this case Assert.That(players, Has.Exactly(1).Items); , That (non-invocable member) and Has(name doesn't exist) error message – Andrei Jan 11 at 12:53
  • @Andrei update the code to match your unit testing framework. That's valid NUnit syntax – Panagiotis Kanavos Jan 11 at 12:56
  • Thank you for helping, I make test for both case – Andrei Jan 11 at 13:19

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