-1

I have two function templates A and B. I define A and then B in the same file. Now I would like to call B in A. How can I realize this? Normal function prototype doesn't work in this case. (Please assume you cannot change the order of A and B or split files.)

#include <iostream>

template <class Type>
Type A(Type x) {
    return 2 * B(x);
}

template <class Type>
Type B(Type x) {
    return 3 * x;
}

int main() {

    int x = 3;
    std::cout << A(x) << "\n"; //=> ERROR

}

ERROR from g++:

test.cpp: In instantiation of ‘Type A(Type) [with Type = int]’:
test.cpp:40:21:   required from here
test.cpp:29:17: error: ‘B’ was not declared in this scope, and no declarations were found by argument-dependent lookup at the point of instantiation [-fpermissive]
     return 2 * B(x);
                ~^~~
test.cpp:33:6: note: ‘template<class Type> Type B(Type)’ declared here, later in the translation unit
 Type B(Type x) {
      ^
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the help pages, take the SO tour, read about how to ask good questions, as well as this question checklist. Lastly please create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example to show us, and also include the full and complete (copy-paste) of the errors (including any possible informational notes). – Some programmer dude Jan 11 at 12:21
  • 2
    Normal function prototype doesn't work in this case. Why? – DeiDei Jan 11 at 12:21
  • I just added the full source and the error message. – matn Jan 11 at 12:29
  • 2
    Now it's an MCVE, thank you. You did not explain the premise of your question, though, i.e. "Normal function prototype doesn't work in this case", which is false. Ah well, makes for an easy answer ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 12:30
  • @DeiDei Sorry, I misunderstood the C++ grammar. Actually it worked as you implied. – matn Jan 11 at 12:39
5

If by prototype you mean declaration, it certainly does work in this case!

You can declare a function template just fine:

#include <iostream>

// Non-defining declaration B
template <class Type>
Type B(Type x);

// Defining declaration A
template <class Type>
Type A(Type x) {
    return 2 * B(x);
}

// Defining declaration B
template <class Type>
Type B(Type x) {
    return 3 * x;
}

int main() {
    int x = 3;
    std::cout << A(x) << "\n"; //=> NO ERROR
}

(live demo)

  • Thank you very much. This is what I wanted. I misunderstood the way of writing "non-defining declaration" so I said "Normal function prototype doesn't work in this case.". – matn Jan 11 at 12:37

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