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In wikipedia BCNF definition is as follows

A relational schema R is in Boyce–Codd normal form if and only if for every one of its dependencies X → Y, at least one of the following conditions hold:

X → Y is a trivial functional dependency (Y ⊆ X)

X is a superkey for schema R

I am wondering , why it is defined as "Superkey" instead of a "minimal Superkey".

Consider a relation schema R(A,B,C,D,E) ,let (A,B) be a key(its minimal). Then AB->CDE, holds (also no other nontrivial functional dependecies are present,as per the definition of schema, in this particular example). Also (A,B,C) is a superkey. ABC->DE also holds but its trivial. My doubt is, if we only specify the condition for minimal superkey , condition for superkey is already implied isn't it ? In all the BCNF example problem I did, to check if a schema is in BCNF. If the LHS of all non trivial functional dependencies present, is a "key". Then the schema is in BCNF. If it is holding for a key ,then its true for all the superkeys based on that key , isn't it ?

  • Because that's how it is. If it said minimal/irreducible superkey, ie CK, it wouldn't give the condition we call BCNF. "Why" is not a helpful or meaningful question in math. We assume things & things follow. We can reasonably ask for a proof/explanation that something follows, or for the first bad step in an argument. What kind of answer do you expect? Why is 2+2=4 & not 47? Can you ask a clearer question? Maybe you have an expectation that some pair of conditions/definitions are equivalent based on certain reasoning that you can give that we can show the faults in or the correctness of? – philipxy Jan 12 at 1:35
  • Eg: Maybe you think adding "minimal" would give a definition of the same condition, that we call BCNF? (It wouldn't.) If so, give your justification, so we can show some place(s) where it goes wrong. – philipxy Jan 12 at 1:35
  • I asked it because, consider a relation schema R(A,B,C,D,E) ,let (A,B) be a key(its minimal). Then AB->CDE, holds (also no other nontrivial functional dependecies are present,as per the definition of schema, in this particular example). Also (A,B,C) is a superkey. ABC->DE also holds but its trivial. My doubt is, if we only specify the condition for minimal superkey , condition for superkey is already implied isn't it ? I thought there would be some reason for specifying the condition as superkey instead of minimal superkey, I was asking for that particular reason. – Mathews George Jan 12 at 2:09
  • Please clarify via post edits, not comments. PS 1. Why you asked why or what your doubts are is not a question. So: What is your question? You mean, what's wrong with a certain argument, but you don't give it clearly. 2. ABC->DE is not trivial. However, it does hold when ABC is a superkey. 3. If the condition given by your definition with "minimal" holds, then BCNF holds. And superkeys that are proper supersets of a CK will be determinants. But they can violate your definition--they can fail both cases/bullets/conditions--eg ABC->DE. They can be present in BCNF but not per your definition. – philipxy Jan 12 at 2:33
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    You can see this answer. – Renzo Jan 20 at 16:05

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