1

I am using bison and I have ran into a shift/reduce conflict. Bison has identified one shift/reduce conflict. I cannot find the ambiguity in this language:

start
    : IDENT trailer EQUAL atom trailer SEMICOLON
    | atom trailer SEMICOLON
    ;

atom
    : LPAR atom trailer RPAR
    | IDENT
    ;

trailer
    : %empty
    | LPAR RPAR
    ;

This problem is also described in the python grammar documentation near the bottom. I can remove the ambiguity by using the solution this documentation describes (change line 2 to atom trialer EQUAL atom trailer SEMICOLON.

Now that it is fixed, I can move on but I am still curious as to the problem. Please describe to me the problem with the grammar above and give an example sentence in the language which has two unique parse trees.

EDIT 1
After further investigation, the following has a shift/reduce conflict:

start
    : IDENT LPAR RPAR EQUAL atom LPAR RPAR SEMICOLON
    | atom LPAR RPAR SEMICOLON
    ;

atom
    : IDENT
    ;

but this does not have a shift/reduce conflict:

start
    : IDENT LPAR RPAR EQUAL IDENT LPAR RPAR SEMICOLON
    | IDENT LPAR RPAR SEMICOLON
    ;

This seems very suspicious to me because in the first grammar atom is forced to produce IDENT, so these two are essentially the same grammar. I still will need some explaining.

0

Shift/reduce conflicts don’t necessarily mean that your grammar is ambiguous. All ambiguous grammars will produce either a shift/reduce or a reduce/reduce conflict, but the converse isn’t necessarily true.

In your case, imagine that the parser has started and has just read an IDENT token followed by LPAR. It has two choices of what to do. First, it could be the case that you’re producing the first (longer) branch of the start nonterminal. In that case, you should shift the LPAR with the plan of reducing the entire long expression later on. Second, it could be that you’re producing the second (shorter) branch of the start nonterminal, which means you should reduce IDENT back to atom. Just knowing that the next terminal is LPAR doesn’t help you differentiate between these cases, hence the shift/reduce conflict.

On the other hand, the second version of your grammar doesn’t require a decision to be made about how to handle the IDENT at the front until much more context is available, and so there’s no conflict.

  • Going with your example, I understand that at the time that the parser has read the IDENT token, then the LPAR token, the parser still doesn't know which path to take. So why doesn't the parser just keep reading tokens until it is sure about which path to take? Reading just a few more tokens will lead to a SEMICOLON or EQUAL which will differentiate the path (or some other token which will lead to a sentence not in the language). – redmoncoreyl Jan 11 at 16:57
  • 2
    @redmoncoreyl: bison produces (by default) LALR(1) parsers, where the (1) means that a parsing decision can be made by looking ahead no more than 1 token. LALR(k) parsers are possible for values of k greater than one, but afaik no parser generators exist for them because the action tables grow exponentially. However, bison will produce a GLR parser if requested; the GLR parser effectively explores both alternatives in parallel so that the decision can be deferred. See the bison manual for details. – rici Jan 11 at 17:16
  • @rici: That really clears things up. I just saw the %glr-parser option. One last question, is the GLR parser slower? If I intend to make an interpreter, should I do what python did (as described in original post) in order to avoid GLR parser because of efficiency? – redmoncoreyl Jan 11 at 17:32
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    @redmoncoreyl: yes, it is slower but only while parsing the constructs which are not determined with a single lookahead. So for most of the input, it is no different than a LALR(1) parser. That usually makes the overhead negligible, but you'd have to benchmark a concrete example for a specific answer. – rici Jan 11 at 17:35
  • @redmoncoreyl: OTOH, you should ask yourself why you want to restrict the assignment syntax to IDENT trailer. Is it really the case that atom trailer '=' is not meaningful? Often, you will find that it is not only sometimes meaningful but even useful. – rici Jan 11 at 17:42

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