5

I want to use the std::array to store the data of N-dimensional vectors and implement arithmetic operations for such vectors. I figured, since the std::array now has a constexpr size() member function, I can use this to unroll the loops that I need for the arithmetic operations over its elements.

Here is a minimal example:

#include <array> 
#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>

template<std::size_t N=0, typename Vector>
void plus_equals(Vector& result, Vector const& input) 
{
    result[N] += input[N]; 

    if constexpr (N + 1 < result.size()) 
        plus_equals<N+1>(result, input); 
}

template<typename INT, size_t N>
class Vector
{
    std::array<INT, N> data_; 

    public: 

        template<typename ... BracketList> 
        Vector(BracketList ... blist)
        :
            data_{std::forward<BracketList>(blist)...}
        {} 

        INT& operator[](std::size_t i)
        {
            return data_[i]; 
        }

        INT operator[](std::size_t i) const 
        {
            return data_[i]; 
        }

        decltype(auto) begin() const 
        {
            return data_.begin(); 
        }

        decltype(auto) end() const 
        {
            return data_.end(); 
        }

        decltype(auto) end() 
        {
            return data_.end(); 
        }

        constexpr decltype(auto) size()
        {
            return data_.size(); 
        }

        void operator+=(Vector const& other)
        {
            plus_equals(*this, other); 
        }
};

template<size_t N = 0, typename Vector> 
Vector operator+(Vector const& uVec, Vector const& vVec)
{
    Vector result {uVec};  

    result += vVec;  

    return result;  
}

template<size_t N = 0, typename Vector> 
Vector sum(Vector const& uVec, Vector const& vVec)
{
    Vector result {uVec};  

    for (decltype(result.size()) i = 0; i < result.size(); ++i)
        result[i] += vVec[i]; 

    return result;  
}

template<typename Vector> 
void print(Vector&& v)
{
    for (const auto& el : v) std::cout << el << " ";  
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

using namespace std; 

int main()
{
    Vector<int, 3> c1 = {1,2,3}; 
    Vector<int, 3> c2 = {3,2,1}; 
    auto r1 = c1 + c2;
    print (r1);

    auto r2 = sum(c2, c2);
    print (r2); 

    Vector<int, 3> s1, s2; 

    for (std::size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
        cin >> s1[i];
    for (std::size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
        cin >> s2[i];

    auto r3 = s1 + s2;
    print(r3);

    auto r4 = sum(s1, s2);
    print(r4);


    return 0;
}

The sum operation is implemented using plus_equals that should unroll the individual += operations on elements of the Vector, and the sum(Vector const&, Vector const&) function, uses a for loop.

I compiled the example on godbolt using -O3 -std=c++2a.

If I comment out everything apart from

Vector<int, 3> c1 = {2,11,7}; 
Vector<int, 3> c2 = {9,22,5}; 
auto r1 = c1 + c2;
print (r1);

I get

    movabs  rax, 141733920779
    sub     rsp, 24
    lea     rdi, [rsp+4]
    mov     QWORD PTR [rsp+4], rax
    mov     DWORD PTR [rsp+12], 12
    call    void print<Vector<int, 3ul>&>(Vector<int, 3ul>&)
    xor     eax, eax
    add     rsp, 24
    ret

What is happening here? Why can't I see the first two constants c1[0] + c2[0] and c1[1] + c2[1]? On the other hand 7 + 5 = 12 is moved:

    mov     DWORD PTR [rsp+12], 12

Why is the assembly of the code

int main()
{
    Vector<int, 3> c1 = {2,11,7}; 
    Vector<int, 3> c2 = {9,22,5}; 
    //auto r1 = c1 + c2;
    //print (r1);

    auto r2 = sum(c1, c2);
    print (r2); 

exactly the same?

If I try to use runtime variables:

    Vector<int, 3> s1, s2; 
    for (std::size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
        cin >> s1[i];
    for (std::size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
        cin >> s2[i];

    auto r3 = s1 + s2;
    print(r3);

I get

    mov     edx, DWORD PTR [rsp+28]
    mov     eax, DWORD PTR [rsp+32]
    lea     rdi, [rsp+36]
    add     eax, DWORD PTR [rsp+20]
    add     edx, DWORD PTR [rsp+16]
    mov     ecx, DWORD PTR [rsp+24]
    add     ecx, DWORD PTR [rsp+12]
    mov     DWORD PTR [rsp+44], eax
    mov     DWORD PTR [rsp+36], ecx
    mov     DWORD PTR [rsp+40], edx

Which links to the plus_equals function template and unrolls the iterations as expected.

For the sum:

Vector<int, 3> s1, s2; 
for (std::size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
    cin >> s1[i];
for (std::size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
    cin >> s2[i];

//auto r3 = s1 + s2;
//print(r3);

auto r4 = sum(s1, s2);
print(r4);

The assembly is:

    mov     edx, DWORD PTR [rsp+32]
    add     edx, DWORD PTR [rsp+20]
    add     ecx, eax
    shr     rax, 32
    add     eax, DWORD PTR [rsp+28]
    mov     DWORD PTR [rsp+44], edx
    mov     DWORD PTR [rsp+40], eax
    mov     DWORD PTR [rsp+36], ecx

And there are no equality comparisons and jumps, so the loop has been unrolled.

When I look at the assembly code of the sum template, there are comparison operators and jumps there. This I expected because I figure that the compiler generates a general code first, for any Vector, and then later on figures out if Vector::size() is constexpr and applies further optimizations.

Is the interpretation OK? If so, can one conclude that there is no sense in manually unrolling iterations for fixed-sized arrays, because with -O3 the loops that use constexpr size member functions will be unrolled anyway by the compiler?

  • 2
    Just to make sure, did you measure and profile that your previous code was to slow for your requirements, or that it was a bottleneck in your program? Did you check if the compiler didn't already do some unrolling or other optimizations? It's not a premature optimization? – Some programmer dude Jan 11 at 14:32
  • 3
    I have profiled my code many times with hpctoolkit and scorep. This doesn't have anything to do with my question: if there is a guarantee that the compiler unrolls the loops when it has constexpr size() in the loop definition, it would make the code much more readable with for loops then with recursive funtion templates. This is important because the code is scientific and will possibly be extended by others. – tmaric Jan 11 at 14:37
  • 9
    Standard doesn't guarantee that any loop would be unrolled. In fact, a compiler might even re-roll a manually unrolled loop (not that I would know of a case where a compiler would do so - but such case might exist). – eerorika Jan 11 at 14:40
  • 3
    " if there is a guarantee that the compiler " - you don't even have to continue, the answer is already 'no', so I guess that answers your question. There are no guarantees about how the compiler does any optimization outside of the language specification. – xaxxon Jan 11 at 14:49
  • 2
    If you want the gcc/clang to unroll the loop when the size is known at compile time (no matter constexpr or not), use flag -funroll-loops . --param max-unroll-times=... can control unrolling depth. These days compiler doesn't do aggressive unrolling normally, because the CPU can handle loop pretty efficiently. But there are still some cases adding -funroll-all-loop will make significant improvement, due to the non-negligible throughput impact of jcc. Especially some subpar gcc vectorization, they have the same performance as unrolling a loop, which isn't done by default. – llllllllll Jan 11 at 15:22
1

The compiler is intelligent enough to automatically unroll loops for you, and you should trust that it's going to be able to do those (and many other) optimizations.

Generally speaking, the compiler is better at making micro-optimizations, while the programmer is better at making macro-optimizations.

Micro-optimizations (what the compiler CAN do):

  • Unroll loops
  • inline functions automatically
  • apply tail call optimization to speed up tail-recursive functions (many end up being as fast as the equivalent loop)
  • elide copies and moves: if you return something by value, in many cases the compiler can get rid of the copy or move entirely.
  • Use vectorized floating point instructions (this one still requires you to help the compiler sometimes, though)
  • Eliminate unnecessary or redundant if statements (for example, when you check something, and then cal a member function that also checks it, when it inlines the member function it'll eliminate the unnecessary check)
  • Inline lambdas passed to other functions (it only does this if you don't wrap it in std::function - it can't inline std::function)
  • Store local variables and even entire structs in the registers, instead of using RAM or Cache
  • Lots o' math optimizations

Macro-optimizations (what the compiler CAN'T do):

These are the things the programmer still has to pay attention to.

  • Change the way data is stored. If something doesn't need to be a pointer, store it on the stack!
  • Change the algorithm used to calculate something. Algorithm design is still important!
  • Other stuff

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