6

Let's start with some code. This is an extremely simplified version of my program.

#include <stdint.h>

volatile uint16_t dummyColorRecepient;

void updateColor(const uint8_t iteration)
{
    uint16_t colorData;
    switch(iteration)
    {
    case 0:
        colorData = 123;
        break;
    case 1:
        colorData = 234;
        break;
    case 2:
        colorData = 345;
        break;
    }
    dummyColorRecepient = colorData;
}

// dummy main function
int main()
{
    uint8_t iteration = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        updateColor(iteration);
        if (++iteration == 3)
            iteration = 0;
    }
}

The program compiles with a warning:

./test.cpp: In function ‘void updateColor(uint8_t)’:
./test.cpp:20:25: warning: ‘colorData’ may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wmaybe-uninitialized]
     dummyColorRecepient = colorData;
     ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^~~~~~~~~~~

As you can see, there is an absolute certainty that the variable iteration is always 0, 1 or 2. However, the compiler doesn't know that and it assumes that switch may not initialize colorData. (Any amount of static analysis during compilation won't help here because the real program is spread over multiple files.)

Of course I could just add a default statement, like default: colorData = 0; but this adds additional 24 bytes to the program. This is a program for a microcontroller and I have very strict limits for its size.

I would like to inform the compiler that this switch is guaranteed to cover all possible values of iteration.

  • 2
    why do you want to do that? You can silence the warning either globally or locally for that single switch statement – user463035818 Jan 11 at 14:50
  • 2
    Can you just use dummyColorRecepient instead of colorData – drescherjm Jan 11 at 14:51
  • 4
    Use an enumeration instead of magic numbers? – Some programmer dude Jan 11 at 14:51
  • 1
    @Neijwiert How do exceptions even work on microcontroller? Wouldn't this generate a lot of additional code? – NO_NAME Jan 11 at 14:56
  • 1
    there is no way compiler will consider this as undefined behavior. Its just a warning, meaning, it potentially is a bug, but it isnt in this case – user463035818 Jan 11 at 14:56
10

As you can see, there is an absolute certainty that the variable iteration is always 0, 1 or 2.

From the perspective of the toolchain, this is not true. You can call this function from someplace else, even from another translation unit. The only place that your constraint is enforced is in main, and even there it's done in a such a way that might be difficult for the compiler to reason about.

For our purposes, though, let's take as read that you're not going to link any other translation units, and that we want to tell the toolchain about that. Well, fortunately, we can!

If you don't mind being unportable, then there's GCC's __builtin_unreachable built-in to inform it that the default case is not expected to be reached, and should be considered unreachable. My GCC is smart enough to know that this means colorData is never going to be left uninitialised unless all bets are off anyway.

#include <stdint.h>

volatile uint16_t dummyColorRecepient;

void updateColor(const uint8_t iteration)
{
    uint16_t colorData;
    switch(iteration)
    {
    case 0:
        colorData = 123;
        break;
    case 1:
        colorData = 234;
        break;
    case 2:
        colorData = 345;
        break;

    // Comment out this default case to get the warnings back!
    default:
        __builtin_unreachable();
    }
    dummyColorRecepient = colorData;
}

// dummy main function
int main()
{
    uint8_t iteration = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        updateColor(iteration);
        if (++iteration == 3)
            iteration = 0;
    }
}

(live demo)

This won't add an actual default branch, because there's no "code" inside it. In fact, when I plugged this into Godbolt using x86_64 GCC with -O2, the program was smaller with this addition than without it — logically, you've just added a major optimisation hint.

There's actually a proposal to make this a standard attribute in C++ so it could be an even more attractive solution in the future.

  • If having a different value than specified is unexpected behavior, why not throw an exception in the default case instead (assuming exceptions are enabled)? – Neijwiert Jan 11 at 14:57
  • @Neijwiert: that's what assertions are for. Exceptions can be handled. – Vittorio Romeo Jan 11 at 14:58
  • 1
    @Neijwiert If the OP can't accept the overhead of another assignment statement, I doubt they can accept the overhead of stack unwinding and exception handling! – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 14:58
  • 1
    @NO_NAME The language doesn't know that ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 15:02
  • 1
    @NO_NAME They're working on it :) – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 15:18
5

Use the "immediately invoked lambda expression" idiom and an assert:

void updateColor(const uint8_t iteration)
{
    const auto colorData = [&]() -> uint16_t
    {
        switch(iteration)
        {
            case 0: return 123;
            case 1: return 234;
        }

        assert(iteration == 2);
        return 345;
    }();

    dummyColorRecepient = colorData;
}
  • The lambda expression allows you to mark colorData as const. const variables must always be initialized.

  • The combination of assert + return statements allows you to avoid warnings and handle all possible cases.

  • assert doesn't get compiled in release mode, preventing overhead.


You can also factor out the function:

uint16_t getColorData(const uint8_t iteration)
{
    switch(iteration)
    {
        case 0: return 123;
        case 1: return 234;
    }

    assert(iteration == 2);
    return 345;
}

void updateColor(const uint8_t iteration)
{
    const uint16_t colorData = getColorData(iteration);
    dummyColorRecepient = colorData;
}
  • wouldn't this generate maybe return without return value warning? Or is lambda special case? – apple apple Jan 11 at 14:52
  • 1
    @appleapple In terms of code size it should be smaller (maybe) - it certainly won't be larger, and the assertion will trap bugs in debug mode, better than the original program would. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 14:56
  • 1
    @Artyer Will still warn in release. In fact even with the assert most likely. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 15:02
  • 1
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit __builtin_unreachable for g++ (Not sure about other compilers) – Artyer Jan 11 at 15:06
  • 1
    The general idea of replacing the last case with default is good, although it decrease the readability. I might use that if I won't find any other way that leaves my intent clear. – NO_NAME Jan 11 at 15:13
3

You can get this to compile without warnings simply by adding a default label to one of the cases:

switch(iteration)
{
case 0:
    colorData = 123;
    break;
case 1:
    colorData = 234;
    break;
case 2: default:
    colorData = 345;
    break;
}

Alternatively:

uint16_t colorData = 345;
switch(iteration)
{
case 0:
    colorData = 123;
    break;
case 1:
    colorData = 234;
    break;
}

Try both, and use the shorter of the two.

  • They both work and seem to generate the same assembly code. I still like the accepted answer more, though. The result is the same and it telegraphs my intent clearer. – NO_NAME Jan 11 at 15:51
  • @NO_NAME: I have to agree with you! I just tried out the accepted answer on GCC for ASM86, and it is shorter than my suggestions. – TonyK Jan 11 at 16:12
  • Huh, this is such a simple and easy solution (just to get rid of the warnings) though in hindsight - good one! – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 16:52
1

I know there have been some good solutions, but alternatively If your values are going to be known at compile time, instead of a switch statement you can use constexpr with a static function template and a couple of enumerators; it would look something like this within a single class:

#include <iostream>

class ColorInfo {
public:
    enum ColorRecipient {
        CR_0 = 0,
        CR_1,
        CR_2
    };

    enum ColorType {
        CT_0 = 123,
        CT_1 = 234,
        CT_2 = 345
    };

    template<const uint8_t Iter>
    static constexpr uint16_t updateColor() {

        if constexpr (Iter == CR_0) {
            std::cout << "ColorData updated to: " << CT_0 << '\n';
            return CT_0;
        }

        if constexpr (Iter == CR_1) {
            std::cout << "ColorData updated to: " << CT_1 << '\n';
            return CT_1;
        }

        if constexpr (Iter == CR_2) {
            std::cout << "ColorData updated to: " << CT_2 << '\n';
            return CT_2;
        }
    }
};

int main() {
    const uint16_t colorRecipient0 = ColorInfo::updateColor<ColorInfo::CR_0>();
    const uint16_t colorRecipient1 = ColorInfo::updateColor<ColorInfo::CR_1>();
    const uint16_t colorRecipient2 = ColorInfo::updateColor<ColorInfo::CR_2>();

    std::cout << "\n--------------------------------\n";
    std::cout << "Recipient0: " << colorRecipient0 << '\n'
              << "Recipient1: " << colorRecipient1 << '\n'
              << "Recipient2: " << colorRecipient2 << '\n';

    return 0;
}

The cout statements within the if constexpr are only added for testing purposes, but this should illustrate another possible way to do this without having to use a switch statement provided your values will be known at compile time. If these values are generated at runtime I'm not completely sure if there is a way to use constexpr to achieve this type of code structure, but if there is I'd appreciate it if someone else with a little more experience could elaborate on how this could be done with constexpr using runtime values. However, this code is very readable as there are no magic numbers and the code is quite expressive.


-Update-

After reading more about constexpr it has come to my attention that they can be used to generate compile time constants. I also learned that they can not generate runtime constants but they can be used within a runtime function. We can take the above class structure and use it within a runtime function as such by adding this static function to the class:

static uint16_t colorUpdater(const uint8_t input) {
    // Don't forget to offset input due to std::cin with ASCII value.
    if ( (input - '0') == CR_0)
        return updateColor<CR_0>();
    if ( (input - '0') == CR_1)
        return updateColor<CR_1>();
    if ( (input - '0') == CR_2)
        return updateColor<CR_2>();

    return updateColor<CR_2>(); // Return the default type
}

However I want to change the naming conventions of the two functions. The first function I will name colorUpdater() and this new function that I just shown above I will name it updateColor() as it seems more intuitive this way. So the updated class will now look like this:

class ColorInfo {
public:
    enum ColorRecipient {
        CR_0 = 0,
        CR_1,
        CR_2
    };

    enum ColorType {
        CT_0 = 123,
        CT_1 = 234,
        CT_2 = 345
    };

    static uint16_t updateColor(uint8_t input) {
        if ( (input - '0') == CR_0 ) {
            return colorUpdater<CR_0>();
        }
        if ( (input - '0') == CR_1 ) {
            return colorUpdater<CR_1>();
        }
        if ( (input - '0') == CR_2 ) {
            return colorUpdater<CR_2>();
        }

        return colorUpdater<CR_0>(); // Return the default type
    }

    template<const uint8_t Iter>
    static constexpr uint16_t colorUpdater() {

        if constexpr (Iter == CR_0) {
            std::cout << "ColorData updated to: " << CT_0 << '\n';
            return CT_0;
        }

        if constexpr (Iter == CR_1) {
            std::cout << "ColorData updated to: " << CT_1 << '\n';
            return CT_1;
        }

        if constexpr (Iter == CR_2) {
            std::cout << "ColorData updated to: " << CT_2 << '\n';
            return CT_2;
        }
    }
};

If you want to use this with compile time constants only you can use it just as before but with the function's updated name.

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    auto output0 = ColorInfo::colorUpdater<ColorInfo::CR_0>();
    auto output1 = ColorInfo::colorUpdater<ColorInfo::CR_1>();
    auto output2 = ColorInfo::colorUpdater<ColorInfo::CR_2>();

    std::cout << "\n--------------------------------\n";
    std::cout << "Recipient0: " << output0 << '\n'
              << "Recipient1: " << output1 << '\n'
              << "Recipient2: " << output2 << '\n';
    return 0;
}

And if you want to use this mechanism with runtime values you can simply do the following:

int main() {
    uint8_t input;
    std::cout << "Please enter input value [0,2]\n";
    std::cin >> input;

    auto output = ColorInfo::updateColor(input);

    std::cout << "Output: " << output << '\n';

    return 0;
}

And this will work with runtime values.

  • This doesn't do the same thing as the original program - come up with a variant on this solution that can loop through the three implementations and we'll talk ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 16:53
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit I can add this too a while loop; I was just illustrating the point of using constexpr. – Francis Cugler Jan 11 at 16:54
  • 1
    Actually fair point you can just put all three in a while loop haha never mind – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 at 16:56
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Depending on whether the OP's input data is runtime or compile time would determine if this code structure would work or not. I'm not sure if there is a way to use runtime values with constexpr. – Francis Cugler Jan 11 at 17:00
  • 1
    It is a nice try but the values in my code are totally non constexpr. Actually, I call function updateColor from other file through a function pointer (there are reasons to do that). Have upvote anyway for an original solution. – NO_NAME Jan 11 at 17:18
0

Well, if you are sure you won't have to handle other possible values, you can just use arithmetic. Gets rid of he branching and the load.

void updateColor(const uint8_t iteration)
{
    dummyColorRecepient = 123 + 111 * iteration;
}
  • Well, this could work if I use constant values in the real code, not only in the example. – NO_NAME Jan 14 at 16:22

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