0
DROP PROCEDURE test
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE test
    @Number INTEGER
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON

    DECLARE @i INT = 1;
    DECLARE @K INT = 1;
    DECLARE @j INT = 0;
    DECLARE @Result NVARCHAR(MAX)

    WHILE(@i <= @Number)
    BEGIN
        WHILE(@K <= @i)
        BEGIN
            IF (@K % @i = 0)
            BEGIN
                SET @j = @j + 1
            END

            SET @k = @k + 1
        END 

        SET @K = 1
        PRINT CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), @i) + 'value has j' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), @j)

        IF (@j = 2)
        BEGIN
            SET @Result = '' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), @i) + ' & ';
            SELECT @Result 
        END

        SET @j = 0;
        SET @i = @i + 1;
    END

    SET NOCOUNT OFF
END
GO      


EXEC test 15

I don't understand what's wrong with this code. Output should be like

2&3&5&7&11&13
  • 3
    What does the output actually look like? – Robert Harvey Jan 11 at 15:35
  • 2
    SQL Server doesn't have a INTEGER, it has INT type. – Yogesh Sharma Jan 11 at 15:36
  • Its working fine with INTEGER .The output is printing all numbers up to 15.Im using microsoft sql server. – Salman Jan 11 at 15:40
  • 1
    @KillerQueen -- sql is not case sensitive. – Hogan Jan 11 at 15:47
  • 2
    @KillerQueen -- C# is, not SQL – Hogan Jan 11 at 15:53
2

Try switching this condition:

From: IF(@K % @i = 0)

To:  IF(@i % @k = 0)

UPDATE: This corrects the string for the results

Declare   @Number INTEGER = 90

     DECLARE @i int =1;
     DECLARE @K int =1;
     DECLARE @j int =0;
     DECLARE @Result NVARCHAR(MAX) = ''
     WHILE(@i <= @Number)
     BEGIN

           WHILE(@K <= @i)
           BEGIN
                if(@i % @k = 0)
                BEGIN
                     SET @j =@j + 1
                END
                SET @k = @k + 1
           END 
       SET @K=1
       print CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),@i)+'value has j'+CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),@j)
       if(@j = 2)
          BEGIN
               SET @Result= @Result + ''+CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),@i) + ' & ';
          END
       SET @j = 0;
       SET @i=@i+1;

     END

SELECT Left(@Result, Len(@Result)-1) As Result   

2 & 3 & 5 & 7 & 11 & 13 & 17 & 19 & 23 & 29 & 31 & 37 & 41 & 43 & 47 & 53 & 59 & 61 & 67 & 71 & 73 & 79 & 83 & 89 
  • Amazing...Thanks – Salman Jan 11 at 16:55
0

I know this has an accepted answer already but for larger values the nested loop approach is going to extremely painfully slow. Besides I really hate loops. Here is an alternate method of this using a tally table and a cross join.

I keep a tally table on my system as a view.

create View [dbo].[cteTally] as

WITH
    E1(N) AS (select 1 from (values (1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1))dt(n)),
    E2(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E1 a, E1 b), --10E+2 or 100 rows
    E4(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E2 a, E2 b), --10E+4 or 10,000 rows max
    cteTally(N) AS 
    (
        SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) FROM E4
    )
select N from cteTally
GO

Now to use this for the purposes of finding prime numbers. Admittedly this doesn't perform much different until you set @NUMBER to 200 or more. In fact this was (very) slightly slower for smaller sets. That could be improved a bit by reducing the size of the cteTally. But the two were dead even at 200 and then the tally table approach really starts to blow the nested loops away. Nearly twice as fast at just 500. And for larger sets (I tried with 30,000 ) the nested loops actually ran out of memory on my test box but the tally table produced results albeit rather slowly.

Declare @Number INTEGER = 500

select t.N
from cteTally t
cross join cteTally t2
where t.N <= @Number
    and t2.N <= @Number
    and t.N <> t2.N
    and t.N % t2.N = 0
group by t.N
having count(*) = 1
order by t.N

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.