1

I wanted to write an application which works like a command shell (ask for a command, execute it, and then ask for the next command, repeat). I failed right away, however, when I tried to split the written command into its separate parts.

I want to split the commands not only at the spaces, but I want to allow arguments to contain spaces, as long as you put them between double quotes.

I couldn't figure figure out what was wrong with my code, even when I went through it line by line.

Module Module1
    Dim _exit As Boolean = False
    Dim prompt As String = ""
    Dim Title As String = ""

    Sub Main()
        Console.Title = Title
        While Not _exit
            Console.Write(prompt)
            Dim returned As String = Console.ReadLine
            Dim parts() As String = split_with_string(returned, False)
            If parts(0) = "exit" Then
                _exit = True
            ElseIf parts(0) = "" Then
                'Space for Commands
            Else
                Console.WriteLine("Unknown Command")
            End If
        End While
    End Sub

    Private Function secindex(ByVal str As String, character As Char)
        Return str.IndexOf(character, str.IndexOf(character) + 1)
    End Function

    Private Function split_with_string(ByVal str As String, ByVal return_parts As Boolean)
        Dim returned As String = str
        Dim parts As New List(Of String)
_next:
        If returned.Length = 1 Then
            parts.Add(returned)
        ElseIf returned.StartsWith("""") Then
            parts.Add(returned.Substring(1, secindex(returned, """") - 1))
            returned = returned.Substring(secindex(returned, """") + 1)
        ElseIf returned.StartsWith(" ") Then
            returned = returned.Substring(1)
        Else
            If returned.Contains(" ") Then
                parts.Add(returned.Substring(0, returned.IndexOf(" ")))
                returned = returned.Substring(returned.IndexOf(" ") + 1)
            Else
                parts.Add(returned)
                returned = ""
            End If
        End If
        If Not returned.Length < 1 Then
            GoTo _next
        End If
        If return_parts Then
            For Each xx In parts.ToArray
                Console.WriteLine(xx)
            Next
        End If
        Return parts.ToArray
    End Function
End Module

I want the function writing the results to the console if the Boolean is set to true.

3

Regex makes complex string parsing like this easy. It has a steep learning curve of its own, but since it's a standard tool available in many languages and programming tools, it would behoove you to become familiar with it sooner or later.

For instance, if you want to get a list that looks like this:

one
two
"this is three"
"this is four"
five

You could use code like this:

Public Sub Main()
    Dim parts() As String = ParseCommand("one two ""this is three"" ""this is four"" five")
    For Each part As String In parts
        Console.WriteLine(part)
    Next
End Sub

Private Function ParseCommand(input As String) As String()
    Return Regex.Matches(input, "(?!"")\S+|""[^""]+""").
        Cast(Of Match)().
        Select(Function(m) m.Value).
        ToArray()
End Function

However, if you want it to strip the quotes off, so the output looks like this:

one
two
this is three
this is four
five

You could do that with a little adjustment to the regex pattern, like this:

Private Function ParseCommand(input As String) As String()
    Return Regex.Matches(input, "(?<p>(?!"")\S+)|""(?<p>[^""]+)""").
        Cast(Of Match)().
        Select(Function(m) m.Groups("p").Value).
        ToArray()
End Function

If you aren't familiar with regex, it's using a pattern to look for matching sub-strings within an input string. The pattern that it's looking for, in the first example is (?!")\S+|"[^"]+". So, it looks through the input string for all of the parts that match that pattern, and it returns just those matching sub-strings. Here's the meaning of the pattern:

  • (?!")\S+ - This matches any word that doesn't start with a "
    • (?!") - Anything enclosed in a (?! ... ) clause is called a negative look-ahead. It means that whatever comes next, it can't be whatever is listed in the clause. In this case, it's saying that whatever comes next cannot start with a " character.
    • \S - This is means any non-space character, so anything that isn't a space or a tab or anything like that
    • + - This means that there must be one or more of those non-space characters
  • | - This means a Boolean OR, meaning that it can match either anything that comes before it or anything that comes after it
  • "[^"]+" - This matches all the words between two " characters, including any whitespace
    • " - Says that matches must start with a "
    • [^"] - Anything enclosed in a [^ ... ] clause is a negative character class. That means that it can be any character that is not one of the ones listed in the clause. In this case, it's saying any character that is not a ".
    • + - This means that there must be one or more of those non-quote characters
    • " - Says that matches must end with a "

The second pattern is basically the same thing, but it's a little more advanced because it's using named groups (e.g. (?<name> sub-pattern)) to match just certain portions of the whole match.

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