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I have a binary file that I have to parse and I'm using Python. Is there a way to take 4 bytes and convert it to a single precision floating point number?

84
>>> import struct
>>> struct.pack('f', 3.141592654)
b'\xdb\x0fI@'
>>> struct.unpack('f', b'\xdb\x0fI@')
(3.1415927410125732,)
>>> struct.pack('4f', 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0)
'\x00\x00\x80?\x00\x00\x00@\x00\x00@@\x00\x00\x80@'
  • 4
    This only works for 4 or 8 byte floats. What about 10-byte floats? – dplass Mar 3 '11 at 3:09
  • I agree with @dplass, what about other floats. And, why is there a comma at the end of this string? – Startec Aug 26 '14 at 8:57
  • 4
    @startec The question was about 4-byte floats. Which string ends with a comma? Only the tuple from struct.unpack has a comma. – tzot Sep 10 '14 at 21:17
  • ok, and what about the comparison of the two numbers? >>> import struct >>> a=3.141592654 >>> print a 3.141592654 >>> a_packed=struct.pack('f', a) >>> b=struct.unpack('f', a_packed)[0] >>> print b 3.14159274101 >>> assert a==b, "A non B" Traceback (most recent call last): ` File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>` AssertionError: A non B – Petr Krampl Oct 27 '15 at 15:58
  • 2
    Note: to view the individual bytes of the bytearray (indicated by b'), use list(). Ex: list(struct.pack('f', 3.141592654)) returns a list of the individual bytes as [219, 15, 73, 64]. This is very handy. – Gabriel Staples Aug 19 '16 at 3:01
4

Just a little addition, if you want a float number as output from the unpack method instead of a tuple just write

>>> [x] = struct.unpack('f', b'\xdb\x0fI@')
>>> x
3.1415927410125732

If you have more floats then just write

>>> [x,y] = struct.unpack('ff', b'\xdb\x0fI@\x0b\x01I4')
>>> x
3.1415927410125732
>>> y
1.8719963179592014e-07
>>> 

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