2

I have a Customers and an Orders database. I need to make some statistics for the first order of all new customers and count the number of first orders from new clients by month.`

var date = new DateTime(now.Year - 1, now.Month, 1);
db.Orders
  .Where(o => o.Customer.IsNew && o.OrderDate > date)
  .GroupBy(o => new { o.OrderDate.Year, o.OrderDate.Month })
  .Select(g => new NewCustomerStatsModel {
     Month = g.Key.Month,
     Year = g.Key.Year,
     Count = g.Count()
  })
  .OrderBy(cs => cs.Year)
  .ThenBy(cs => cs.Month)
  .ToList();

This query provide me the number of orders for all new client but I need to get only the sum of the first order for each new Customer if the first order date is greater than the provided date.

Is it possible to do it with a query (and how) or am I forced to use AsEnumerable and do it in memory?

2
  • How is "the sum" of an order represented? A property on the order? A calculation against items associated with the order? Jan 11, 2019 at 16:55
  • 1
    @StriplingWarrior sorry, I mean I need the count of all the customers that already ordered Something and the date of the first order is used as the date when the Customer should enter in the statistics. he shouldn't be counted in the statistics if he only Registered and didn't ordered anything. And the "IsNew" property is a data that comes from a earlier migration. some customers were already in another database then their first order shouldn't be counted in the current "first orders" statistics.
    – Demonia
    Jan 11, 2019 at 17:02

2 Answers 2

3

I need to make some statistics for the first order of all new customers

var clientFirstOrders = db.Customers.Where(c => c.IsNew)
    .Select(c => new{
        Customer = c, 
        FirstOrder = c.Orders.OrderBy(c => c.OrderDate).FirstOrDefault()
    })
    // might have to do (int?)FirstOrder.Id != null or something like that.
    .Where(e => e.FirstOrder != null);

and count the number of first orders from new clients by month.

var clientCountByFirstOrderMonth = clientFirstOrders 
    .GroupBy(e => new { e.FirstOrder.OrderDate.Year, e.FirstOrder.OrderDate.Month })
    .Select(g => new{g.Key.Year, g.Key.Month, Count = g.Count()}); 
5
  • I tried Something like that but the problem is that the Customers db doesn't have an Orders property. the orders are linked to the customers
    – Demonia
    Jan 11, 2019 at 17:42
  • 1
    @Demonia: I imagine there are a number of ways to fix that. The best would probably be to add the Orders property (and appropriate mappings) to your Customer model. Jan 11, 2019 at 21:40
  • That's what I thought too but unfortunately, I can't change the structure, it's a shared dll and I'm not the owner of this part of the code. I asked them sometime ago and they couldn't change it because there is too much dependencies and code already written. that's why I was searching for a solution for this query.
    – Demonia
    Jan 14, 2019 at 10:18
  • Thanks, I could find a solution with your help.
    – Demonia
    Jan 14, 2019 at 14:03
  • @Demonia: You could alternatively replace c.Orders in my solution with something like db.Orders.Where(o => o.CustomerId == c.CustomerId). Jan 14, 2019 at 16:50
0

I could find the solution.

With some appropriate index, the performances are pretty good.

It's probably not a perfect solution, but I couldn't update the entities because it's not my Library.

var date = new DateTime(now.Year - 1, now.Month, 1);
var result = db.Orders
  .Where(o => o.Customer.IsNew && o.State != OrderState.Cancelled) // get all orders where the Customer is a new one.
  .GroupBy(o => o.Customer.Id) // group by customer
  .Select(g => g.OrderBy(o => o.OrderDate).FirstOrDefault()) // get the first order for every customer
  .Where(o => o.OrderDate > date) // restrict to the given date
  .GroupBy(o => new { o.OrderDate.Year, o.OrderDate.Month) }) // then group by month
  .Select(g => new NewCustomerStatsModel {
    Month = g.Key.Month,
    Year = g.Key.Year,
    Count = g.Count()
  })
  .OrderBy(g => g.Year)
  .ThenBy(g => g.Month)
  .ToList();

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