2

I'm trying to get a recordset with a count of sales for each hour in the past 24 hours, filling in empty hours with zeros.

My example dataset looks like this and contains two test rows:

id | saleID            | amount      | created
---|-------------------|-------------|-------------
1  | 6032b317-1533...  | 20000       | 2019-01-10 23:56:40
2  | 43556fg6-5344...  | 60000       | 2019-01-11 18:06:32

The current time, for example, is 18:10, so the result I'm looking for is:

| hourOrderID | saleHour | saleHourTotal |
| ----------- | -------- | ------------- |
| 1           | 18:00    | 1             |
| 2           | 17:00    | 0             |
| 3           | 16:00    | 0             |
| 4           | 15:00    | 0             |
| 5           | 14:00    | 0             |
| 6           | 13:00    | 0             |
| 7           | 12:00    | 0             |
| 8           | 11:00    | 0             |
| 9           | 10:00    | 0             |
| 10          | 9:00     | 0             |
| 11          | 8:00     | 0             |
| 12          | 7:00     | 0             |
| 13          | 6:00     | 0             |
| 14          | 5:00     | 0             |
| 15          | 4:00     | 0             |
| 16          | 3:00     | 0             |
| 17          | 2:00     | 0             |
| 18          | 1:00     | 0             |
| 19          | 0:00     | 0             |
| 20          | 23:00    | 1             |
| 21          | 22:00    | 0             |
| 22          | 21:00    | 0             |
| 23          | 20:00    | 0             |
| 24          | 19:00    | 0             |
| 25          | 18:00    | 0             |

Please note; between 18:00-19:00 today there was 1 sale and between 18:00-19:00 yesterday there was 0. This is my issue.

The result I'm actually getting is:

| hourOrderID | saleHour | saleHourTotal |
| ----------- | -------- | ------------- |
| 1           | 18:00    | 1             |
| 2           | 17:00    | 0             |
| 3           | 16:00    | 0             |
| 4           | 15:00    | 0             |
| 5           | 14:00    | 0             |
| 6           | 13:00    | 0             |
| 7           | 12:00    | 0             |
| 8           | 11:00    | 0             |
| 9           | 10:00    | 0             |
| 10          | 9:00     | 0             |
| 11          | 8:00     | 0             |
| 12          | 7:00     | 0             |
| 13          | 6:00     | 0             |
| 14          | 5:00     | 0             |
| 15          | 4:00     | 0             |
| 16          | 3:00     | 0             |
| 17          | 2:00     | 0             |
| 18          | 1:00     | 0             |
| 19          | 0:00     | 0             |
| 20          | 23:00    | 1             |
| 21          | 22:00    | 0             |
| 22          | 21:00    | 0             |
| 23          | 20:00    | 0             |
| 24          | 19:00    | 0             |
| 25          | 18:00    | 1             | <----- this isn't yesterday, it's today

The query I've been working on is:

SELECT
    aux.id AS hourOrderID,
    CONCAT(aux.dh, ':00') AS saleHour,
    COALESCE(COUNT(ets.saleID), 0) AS saleHourTotal
FROM eventTicketSales AS ets 
RIGHT JOIN (
    SELECT 1 AS id, HOUR(UTC_TIMESTAMP()) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 2 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 3 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 2 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 4 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 3 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 5 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 4 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 6 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 5 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 7 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 6 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 8 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 7 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 9 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 8 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 10 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 9 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 11 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 10 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 12 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 11 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 13 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 12 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 14 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 13 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 15 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 14 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 16 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 15 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 17 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 16 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 18 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 17 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 19 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 18 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 20 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 19 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 21 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 20 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 22 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 21 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 23 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 22 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 24 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 23 HOUR)) AS dh UNION
    SELECT 25 AS id, HOUR(DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR)) AS dh
) AS aux ON HOUR(ets.created) = aux.dh
         AND ets.created > DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP, INTERVAL 24 HOUR)
GROUP BY aux.id, aux.dh
ORDER BY hourOrderID

And you can fiddle with my bits here :o

I would like it so the last hour in the set is from the previous day but my brain has decided it can't go any further and requires assistance.

I tried adding another UNION for a 25th hour and also tried extending the timeframe to 25 hours but the results were far off what I wanted:

AND ets.created > DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP, INTERVAL 25 HOUR

Please suggest what can be changed to make this work as expected.

  • The id range 1 to 25 in the delivered table looks wierd for starters.. id 25 can never match with HOUR(ets.created) = aux.dh – Raymond Nijland Jan 11 at 18:57
  • Consider handling issues of data display in application code – Strawberry Jan 11 at 18:58
  • @Strawberry I intend to handle the display application level. hourOrderID and saleHour are purely to help me understand the query as I build it, and for others to help me on SO. I only need saleHourTotal for the chart I want to plot. – Martin James Jan 11 at 19:37
  • @Strawberry or do you mean that I should be filling in the missing dates in application level? – Martin James Jan 11 at 19:48
  • It's what I'd do – Strawberry Jan 11 at 20:27
1

I took the advice of @Strawberry in the comment section and decided to do this application level, which now makes a lot of sense, as it's much easier to read. I don't regret trying the SQL version, as I learned a bit.

I'm posting the solution I went with below, which is in PHP for anybody that needs something similar. If anybody has a more efficient solution than this please share in the comments.

The Query:

SELECT
    CONCAT(DATE_FORMAT(created, '%Y-%m-%d %H'), ':00:00') AS saleHour,
    SUM(amount) AS totalSales
FROM eventTicketSales
WHERE created BETWEEN DATE_SUB(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), INTERVAL 24 HOUR) AND UTC_TIMESTAMP
GROUP BY HOUR(created);

The result:

saleHour                 totalSales
2019-01-11 17:00:00      10000
2019-01-10 23:00:00      20000

Stored in $salesIn24Hours

The Logic:

$hours = 24 + 1;
for ($i=0; $i<$hours; $i++) {
    $date = date('Y-m-d H', strtotime('-'.$i.' HOUR')).':00:00';
    $key = array_search($date, array_column($salesIn24Hours, 'saleHour'));
    if ($key !== FALSE) {
        echo $date . ' ' . $salesIn24Hours[$key]['totalSales'] . '<br>';
    } else {
        echo $date . ' 0' . '<br>';
    }
}

The Result:

2019-01-11 21:00:00  0
2019-01-11 20:00:00  0
2019-01-11 19:00:00  0
2019-01-11 18:00:00  0
2019-01-11 17:00:00  10000
2019-01-11 16:00:00  0
2019-01-11 15:00:00  0
2019-01-11 14:00:00  0
2019-01-11 13:00:00  0
2019-01-11 12:00:00  0
2019-01-11 11:00:00  0
2019-01-11 10:00:00  0
2019-01-11 09:00:00  0
2019-01-11 08:00:00  0
2019-01-11 07:00:00  0
2019-01-11 06:00:00  0
2019-01-11 05:00:00  0
2019-01-11 04:00:00  0
2019-01-11 03:00:00  0
2019-01-11 02:00:00  0
2019-01-11 01:00:00  0
2019-01-11 00:00:00  0
2019-01-10 23:00:00  20000
2019-01-10 22:00:00  0
2019-01-10 21:00:00  0
  • 1
    I'd group by Salehour, I think – Strawberry Jan 12 at 8:46
  • @Strawberry good catch, thanks. – Martin James Jan 12 at 15:56
1

(For purposes of syntax, I'm assuming you're using MySQL.)

In order to produce 25 rows of data from a single SELECT statement, you need a table (real or fake) that has 25 rows, which is exactly what your inner SELECT did. Before showing a simpler way to actually construct the inner table, I'd suggest adding a few more columns to it (assuming the current time is 6 PM on December 31):

| hourOrderID | saleHour | startTime        | endTime          |
| ----------- | -------- | ---------------- | ---------------- |
| 1           | 18:00    | 2019-01-10 18:00 | 2019-01-10 19:00 |
| 2           | 17:00    | 2019-01-10 17:00 | 2019-01-10 18:00 |
| 3           | 16:00    | 2019-01-10 16:00 | 2019-01-10 17:00 |
| 4           | 15:00    | 2019-01-10 15:00 | 2019-01-10 16:00 |
| 5           | 14:00    | 2019-01-10 14:00 | 2019-01-10 15:00 |
| 6           | 13:00    | 2019-01-10 13:00 | 2019-01-10 14:00 |
| 7           | 12:00    | 2019-01-10 12:00 | 2019-01-10 13:00 |
| 8           | 11:00    | 2019-01-10 11:00 | 2019-01-10 12:00 |
| 9           | 10:00    | 2019-01-10 10:00 | 2019-01-10 11:00 |
| 10          | 9:00     | 2019-01-10 09:00 | 2019-01-10 10:00 |
| 11          | 8:00     | 2019-01-10 08:00 | 2019-01-10 09:00 |
| 12          | 7:00     | 2019-01-10 07:00 | 2019-01-10 08:00 |
| 13          | 6:00     | 2019-01-10 06:00 | 2019-01-10 07:00 |
| 14          | 5:00     | 2019-01-10 05:00 | 2019-01-10 06:00 |
| 15          | 4:00     | 2019-01-10 04:00 | 2019-01-10 05:00 |
| 16          | 3:00     | 2019-01-10 03:00 | 2019-01-10 04:00 |
| 17          | 2:00     | 2019-01-10 02:00 | 2019-01-10 03:00 |
| 18          | 1:00     | 2019-01-10 01:00 | 2019-01-10 02:00 |
| 19          | 0:00     | 2019-01-10 00:00 | 2019-01-10 01:00 |
| 20          | 23:00    | 2019-01-09 23:00 | 2019-01-10 00:00 |
| 21          | 22:00    | 2019-01-09 22:00 | 2019-01-09 23:00 |
| 22          | 21:00    | 2019-01-09 21:00 | 2019-01-09 22:00 |
| 23          | 20:00    | 2019-01-09 20:00 | 2019-01-09 21:00 |
| 24          | 19:00    | 2019-01-09 19:00 | 2019-01-09 20:00 |
| 25          | 18:00    | 2019-01-09 18:00 | 2019-01-09 19:00 |

Then your query would be quite straightforward:

SELECT
    aux.hourOrderID,
    aux.saleHour,
    COALESCE(COUNT(ets.saleID), 0) AS saleHourTotal
  FROM madeUpTable AS aux LEFT JOIN eventTicketSales AS ets
      ON aux.startTime <= ets.created AND ets.created < aux.endTime
GROUP BY aux.hourOrderID
ORDER BY hourOrderID

Turns out you can use Common Table Expressions (https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/with.html) to do exactly this:

WITH RECURSIVE aux AS
(
    SELECT 1 AS hourOrderId,
           HOUR(UTC_TIMESTAMP()) AS saleHour,
           DATE_ADD(
               DATE_FORMAT(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), "%Y-%m-%d %H:00:00"),
               INTERVAL 0 HOUR
           ) AS startDate,
           DATE_ADD(
               DATE_FORMAT(UTC_TIMESTAMP(), "%Y-%m-%d %H:00:00"),
               INTERVAL 1 HOUR
           ) AS endDate
    UNION ALL
    SELECT n + 1,
           HOUR(DATE_SUB(startDate, INTERVAL 1 HOUR)),
           DATE_SUB(startDate, INTERVAL 1 HOUR),
           DATE_SUB(startDate, INTERVAL 1 HOUR)
      FROM aux
     WHERE n < 25
)
SELECT
    aux.hourOrderID,
    aux.saleHour,
    COALESCE(COUNT(ets.saleID), 0) AS saleHourTotal
  FROM madeUpTable AS aux LEFT JOIN eventTicketSales AS ets
      ON aux.startTime <= ets.created AND ets.created < aux.endTime
GROUP BY aux.hourOrderID
ORDER BY hourOrderID

Personally I try to limit use of this technique on code that involves other people because it's not something that most people have seen in the wild, but for SQL that is just for me, I find this more straightforward to read because the query itself is simple. IMHO the most complicated part of this is actually just rounding the current time to the nearest hour while preserving the date part.

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