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I'm studying monad composition. While I already understand how to compose, say, Async and Result as performed here I'm struggling in composing the Continuation Monad and the State Monad.

Starting from a basic State Monad implementation and aState-based-Stack for testing purposes:

type State<'State,'Value> = State of ('State -> 'Value * 'State)

module State =
    let runS (State f) state = f state

    let returnS x =
        let run state =
            x, state
        State run

    let bindS f xS =
        let run state =
            let x, newState = runS xS state
            runS (f x) newState
        State run

    let getS =
        let run state = state, state
        State run

    let putS newState =
        let run _ = (), newState
        State run

    type StateBuilder()=
        member __.Return(x) = returnS x
        member __.Bind(xS,f) = bindS f xS

    let state = new StateBuilder()

module Stack =
    open State

    type Stack<'a> = Stack of 'a list

    let popStack (Stack contents) = 
        match contents with
        | [] -> failwith "Stack underflow"
        | head::tail ->     
            head, (Stack tail)

    let pushStack newTop (Stack contents) = 
        Stack (newTop::contents)

    let emptyStack = Stack []

    let getValue stackM = 
        runS stackM emptyStack |> fst

    let pop() = state {
        let! stack = getS
        let top, remainingStack = popStack stack
        do! putS remainingStack 
        return top }

    let push newTop = state {
        let! stack = getS
        let newStack = pushStack newTop stack
        do! putS newStack 
        return () }

Then having also a basic implementation of a Continuation Monad :

type Cont<'T,'r> = (('T -> 'r) -> 'r)

module Continuation =
    let returnCont x = (fun k -> k x)
    let bindCont f m = (fun k -> m (fun a -> f a k))
    let delayCont f = (fun k -> f () k)
    let runCont (c:Cont<_,_>) cont = c cont
    let callcc (f: ('T -> Cont<'b,'r>) -> Cont<'T,'r>) : Cont<'T,'r> =
        fun cont -> runCont (f (fun a -> (fun _ -> cont a))) cont

    type ContinuationBuilder() =
        member __.Return(x) = returnCont x
        member __.ReturnFrom(x) = x
        member __.Bind(m,f) = bindCont f m
        member __.Delay(f) = delayCont f
        member this.Zero () = this.Return ()

    let cont = new ContinuationBuilder()

I'm trying to compose it like this :

module StateK =
    open Continuation

    let runSK (State f) state = cont { return f state }
    let returnSK x = x |> State.returnS |> returnCont

    let bindSK f xSK = cont {
        let! xS = xSK
        return (State.bindS f xS) }

    let getSK k =
        let run state = state, state
        State run |> k

    let putSK newState = cont {
        let run _ = (), newState
        return State run }

    type StateContinuationBuilder() =
        member __.Return(x) = returnSK x
        member __.ReturnFrom(x) = x
        member __.Bind(m,f) = bindSK f m
        member this.Zero () = this.Return () 

    let stateK = new StateContinuationBuilder()

While this compiles and seems right (as far as a mechanically-following-steps-composition goes) I'm not able to implement a StateK-based-Stack. So far I have this, but it is totally wrong:

module StackCont =
    open StateK

    type Stack<'a> = Stack of 'a list

    let popStack (Stack contents) =  stateK {
        match contents with
        | [] -> return failwith "Stack underflow"
        | head::tail ->     
            return head, (Stack tail) }

    let pushStack newTop (Stack contents) = stateK {
        return Stack (newTop::contents) }

    let emptyStack = Stack []

    let getValue stackM = stateK {
        return runSK stackM emptyStack |> fst }

    let pop() = stateK {
        let! stack = getSK
        let! top, remainingStack = popStack stack
        do! putSK remainingStack 
        return top }

    let push newTop = stateK {
        let! stack = getSK
        let! newStack = pushStack newTop stack
        do! putSK newStack 
        return () }

Some help to understand why and how is more than welcome. If there is some reading material you can point to, it will also work.

********* EDIT after AMieres comment **************

New bindSK implementation trying to keep signatures right.

type StateK<'State,'Value,'r> = Cont<State<'State,'Value>,'r>

module StateK =

    let returnSK x :  StateK<'s,'a,'r> = x |> State.returnS |> Continuation.returnCont
    let bindSK (f : 'a ->  StateK<'s,'b,'r>) 
        (m : StateK<'s,'a,'r>) :  StateK<'s,'b,'r> =
        (fun cont ->
            m (fun (State xS) ->
                let run state =
                    let x, newState = xS state
                    (f x) (fun (State k) -> k newState)
                cont (State run)))

Nevertheless, the type 'r has been constrained to be 'b * 's I have tried to remove the constraint but I haven't yet been able to do it

  • I can tell you that bindSK is not correct. The type of f is supposed to be: 'a -> Cont<State<'s,'b>,'r> but instead it is: 'a -> State<'s,'b> – AMieres Jan 11 at 23:31
  • thanks @AMieres, I did again my implementation, now it seems I have an unwanted constraint. 'r has been constraint to be 'b*'s – sabotero Jan 13 at 14:18
  • Are you sure it is even possible to do? It seems to me that it is paradoxical. Since the last continuation is the only one able to run the state monad and since the state value determines the continuation. How can the right continuation be determined in advance? – AMieres Jan 13 at 20:09
  • I think it is, the state is supposed to run in every continuation. I will read more about the subject and give it another try – sabotero Jan 14 at 9:26
  • @AMieres I came around with a working implementation, see my answer below. What do you think? – sabotero Jan 15 at 20:42
1

I have not been able to solve it either.

I can only give you a tip that may help you understand it better. Replace generic types for regular types, for instance instead of:

let bindSK (f : 'a ->  StateK<'s,'b,'r>) 
    (m : StateK<'s,'a,'r>) :  StateK<'s,'b,'r> =
    (fun cont ->
        m (fun (State xS) ->
            let run state =
                let x, newState = xS state
                (f x) (fun (State k) -> k newState)
            cont (State run)))

replace 's with string, 'a with int, 'b with char and 'r with float

let bindSK (f : int ->  StateK<string,char,float>) 
    (m : StateK<string,int,float>) :  StateK<string,char,float> =
    (fun cont ->
        m (fun (State xS) ->
            let run state =
                let x, newState = xS state
                (f x) (fun (State k) -> k newState)
            cont (State run)))

that way is easier to see that

  • k is string -> char * string
  • so k newState is char * string
  • (f x) is (State<string,char> -> float) -> float
  • and m is (State<string,int> -> float) -> float

so they are not compatible.

1

I read more and it comes out that the correct type for a "ContinuousState" is 's -> Cont<'a * 's, 'r>

So I re-implemented the StateK monad with this signatures and all flew naturally.

Here is the code (I added mapSK and applySK for completeness):

type Cont<'T,'r> = (('T -> 'r) -> 'r)

let returnCont x = (fun k -> k x)
let bindCont f m = (fun k -> m (fun a -> f a k))
let delayCont f = (fun k -> f () k)

type ContinuationBuilder() =
    member __.Return(x) = returnCont x
    member __.ReturnFrom(x) = x
    member __.Bind(m,f) = bindCont f m
    member __.Delay(f) = delayCont f
    member this.Zero () = this.Return ()

let cont = new ContinuationBuilder()

type StateK<'State,'Value,'r> = StateK of ('State -> Cont<'Value * 'State, 'r>)

module StateK =
    let returnSK x =
        let run state = cont {
            return x, state
        }
        StateK run

    let runSK (StateK fSK : StateK<'s,'a,'r>) (state : 's) : Cont<'a * 's, _> = cont {
        return! fSK state }

    let mapSK (f : 'a -> 'b) (m : StateK<'s,'a,'r>) : StateK<'s,'b,'r> =
            let run state = cont {
                let! x, newState = runSK m state
                return f x, newState  }
            StateK run

    let bindSK (f : 'a -> StateK<'s,'b,'r>) (xSK : StateK<'s,'a,'r>) : (StateK<'s,'b,'r>) =
        let run state = cont {
            let! x, newState = runSK xSK state
            return! runSK (f x) newState }
        StateK run

    let applySK (fS : StateK<'s, 'a -> 'b, 'r>) (xSK : StateK<'s,'a,'r>) : StateK<'s,'b,'r> =
        let run state = cont {
            let! f, s1 = runSK fS state
            let! x, s2 = runSK xSK s1
            return f x, s2 }
        StateK run        

    let getSK =
        let run state = cont { return state, state }
        StateK run

    let putSK newState =
        let run _ = cont { return (), newState }
        StateK run

    type StateKBuilder() =
        member __.Return(x) = returnSK x
        member __.ReturnFrom (x) = x
        member __.Bind(xS,f) = bindSK f xS
        member this.Zero() = this.Return ()

    let stateK = new StateKBuilder()

module StackCont =
    open StateK

    type Stack<'a> = Stack of 'a list

    let popStack (Stack contents) = 
        match contents with
        | [] -> failwith "Stack underflow"
        | head::tail ->     
            head, (Stack tail)

    let pushStack newTop (Stack contents) = 
        Stack (newTop::contents)

    let emptyStack = Stack []

    let getValueSK stackM = cont {
        let! f = runSK stackM emptyStack 
        return f |> fst }

    let pop() = stateK {
        let! stack = getSK
        let top, remainingStack = popStack stack
        do! putSK remainingStack 
        return top }

    let push newTop = stateK {
        let! stack = getSK
        let newStack = pushStack newTop stack
        do! putSK newStack 
        return () }

open StateK
open StackCont

let helloWorldSK = (fun () -> stateK {
    do! push "world"
    do! push "hello"
    let! top1 = pop()
    let! top2 = pop()
    let combined = top1 + " " + top2 
    return combined
})

let helloWorld = getValueSK (helloWorldSK ()) id
printfn "%s" helloWorld
  • The bind function has the following signature: f : 'a -> Cont<State<'b,'c>,State<'b,'c>> -> xSK: Cont<State<'b,'a>,'d> -> Cont<State<'b,'c>,'d> that is because you are running the continuation with an id function, which means basically that you supplied the continuation and it does nothing. It is equivalent to unwrapping the continuation monad, taking out the state monad, binding it, and wrapping it again with a continuation. Which makes you question why wrap it inside a continuation monad in the first place? – AMieres Jan 15 at 23:12
  • oh, I see... well It may be more difficult that I thought – sabotero Jan 16 at 7:10
  • @AMieres I came around with the good solution this time! – sabotero yesterday
  • Yes! I think you are right. It is not exactly a composition of the State and Cont monads. Instead is an implementation of state using the Cont monad. It is definitely the right thing. – AMieres yesterday
  • 1
    Next, I would suggest studying the Eff monad. It is a monad that lets you use all the monads in one State, Reader, Writer, Result, etc. No need to be combining other monads this one does them all!\. – AMieres yesterday

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