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I have a csv which contains the following data

this_year   |   minus_one_year  |   minus_two_year  |   minus_three_year
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
1           |   2               |   2               |   3
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
4           |   5               |   5               |   5
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
2           |   2               |   2               |   2
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
4           |   5               |   4               |   4
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
1           |   2               |   3               |   3
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

I read this csv file and now I need to organise the data. My end goal is to have the following output

{
  "nodes": [
    {
      "name": "1",
      "node": "this_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "2",
      "node": "this_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "4",
      "node": "this_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "2",
      "node": "minus_one_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "5",
      "node": "minus_one_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "2",
      "node": "minus_two_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "3",
      "node": "minus_two_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "4",
      "node": "minus_two_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "5",
      "node": "minus_two_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "2",
      "node": "minus_three_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "3",
      "node": "minus_three_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "4",
      "node": "minus_three_year"
    },
    {
      "name": "5",
      "node": "minus_three_year"
    }
  ]
}

So for each column, I am getting the unique values. So this_year has 3 nodes, because the data contains 3 unique values, 1, 2, and 4.

I am using D3 but at the moment this is only involved with the parsing. For the formatting of data, I think I am on the right track, I am using map.

So far I have something like this

let graph = {"nodes" : [], "links" : []};

graph.nodes = output.map(function(d) { return [
  {
    'name': d.current_month,
    'node': d.value
  }
]; });

console.log(graph.nodes)

Where output is the csv data. Obviously this is not working, but getting a bit confused by all this mapping and reducing etc. So with the data I have, how can I achieve the above output?

I have included a JSFiddle to demonstrate what I have done so far.

Many thanks

UPDATE

 d3.csv('churn_status.csv')
    .then(function(data) {

        vm.graph.nodes = data.reduce(function(acc, line){
            return acc.concat(Object.entries(line).map(function(column){
                return {name: column[0], node: column[1]}
            }))}, []);


        vm.graph.nodes = vm.graph.nodes.sort(function(a,b) { return a.name > b.name ? -1 : 1});
    })
    .catch(function(error){
        // handle error
    });
  • have you looked at the output: ALL is UNDEFINED – rioV8 Jan 11 at 21:08
  • it's undefined because it's accessing keys d.current_month and d.value that doesn't exist. Do you want to groups by unique values? or just make the nodes as your example? – cal_br_mar Jan 11 at 21:14
  • Hi, it would be unique for each column, so that it ends up like my output. Sorry, current_month was supposed to be this_year, was playing about with it. – kate_hudson Jan 11 at 21:28
2

Here is one way to do that, you have to break the lines into key / value using Object.entries(), then push your new objects to nodes.

Note Object.entries({a:100}) returns an array ["a", 100]

let graph = {"nodes" : [], "links" : []};

output.forEach(function(line) { 
    Object.entries(line).forEach(function(column){
      graph.nodes.push({
         'name': column[0],
         'node': column[1]
      })
  })
})
console.log(graph.nodes)

Edit: you can also use the reduce function that works in similar way

output.reduce(function(acc, line){
    return acc.concat(Object.entries(line).map(function(column){
        return {name: column[0], node: column[1]}
    }))}, [])
  • This appears to give a very strange output, not like the output I was after e.g. jsfiddle.net/6vy5w3hp – kate_hudson Jan 11 at 22:21
  • 1
    yes, it works when you use d3.csvParse(data) not with d3.csvParseRows(data) those are two different methods. – cal_br_mar Jan 11 at 22:30
  • Ahh, okay, I see now. To through another spanner in the works, I was just showing an example because I couldnt get a csv online. Really, I am using d3.csv('some.csv') does that make a difference? Also, is it possible to order this by the columns, so all this_year ones come first etc? – kate_hudson Jan 11 at 22:38
  • 1
    yes, you can just sort your graph.nodes graph.nodes.sort(function(a,b) { return a.name > b.name? -1 : 1}) and if is the same with d3.csv() put your code inside the function d3.csv('some.csv', function(output) { //here is your code }) – cal_br_mar Jan 11 at 23:12
  • 1
    once you've processed the nodes, you can re-assign it graph.nodes = graph.nodes.sort(function(a,b) { return a.name > b.name? -1 : 1}) – cal_br_mar Jan 12 at 0:03
1

Row 1 within your csv are the titles. This has to be repeated in the node object to suit your model. You could achieve this by looping through the titles and then parsing the rest of the csv file:

var d3 = require("d3");
let data = "this_year,minus_one_year,minus_two_year,minus_three_year\n1,2,2,3\n4,5,5,5\n2,2,2,2\n4,5,4,4\n1,2,3,3";

let output = d3.csvParseRows(data);
let nodeTitles = output[0];
let graph = {"nodes" : []};

console.log(nodeTitles);

for (var i = 0; i < nodeTitles.length; i++) {
    for (var j = 1; j < output.length; j++)
    {
        var obj = {name:output[j][i], node:nodeTitles[i]}; 
        if (!graph.nodes.some(function(element) {
            return (element.name == output[j][i]) && (element.node == nodeTitles[i]);
          }))
        {
            graph.nodes.push(obj);
        }
    }
}
console.log(graph);
New contributor
Darren is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
  • Thanks, I have tested it and it works well. Only problem is that it duplicates values for each column. So year_1 should only have 3 nodes (1, 2 and 4), currently it has 5 e.g. jsfiddle.net/91xrbq6h – kate_hudson Jan 11 at 22:18
  • @kate_hudson, I have edited to only add unique items to the final array – Darren Jan 11 at 23:23
  • Many thanks. Random question, I have just found out that csvParseRows returns an array as it assumes there is no header. In my real code, I am not reading in a string, but a real csv file, therefore using d3's csv function which parses things as an object. When I apply this code to that, it obviously doesnt work. Do you know what I would need to do to get it working with an object? Many thanks – kate_hudson Jan 11 at 23:37
0

map function parameter d has no property "current_month" and "value". And your SCV also has no fields with this name.

New contributor
Kacha Tschalataschvili is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.

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