-9
int* p = malloc(sizeof(int)*5);
*p = 1, *(p+1) = 2, *(p+2) = 3, *(p+3) = 4, *(p+4) = 5;
for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++){
    //what exactly is going on in these lines?
    printf("%d %p\n", (*p++)++, p); 
    //printf("%d %p\n", (*++p)++, p);
    //printf("%d %p\n", ++(*p++), p);
    //printf("%d %p\n", ++(*++p), p);
} 

What is operator precedence in these lines above?

put on hold as unclear what you're asking by chux, Jean-François Fabre, Govind Parmar, gnat, greg-449 Jan 12 at 8:49

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    In which line? What is unclear to you? – UnholySheep Jan 11 at 20:26
  • 2
    As there is no sequence point in the arguments passed to printf you don't know what value of p will be printed. – Weather Vane Jan 11 at 20:26
  • 4
    int ptr = malloc(sizeof(int)*5); : you mean int * p = malloc(sizeof(int)*5); I suppose ? – bruno Jan 11 at 20:26
  • Pointer arithmetics in printf lines. – Sand Jan 11 at 20:27
  • 1
    Look at an operator precedence chart, factor in order of evaluation, and you should be able to figure it out. If there is something specific you don't get, or are not sure about, then ask just about that. – Deduplicator Jan 11 at 20:28
3

If we add parentheses to all potentially ambiguous expressions in the code above, we get:

int p = malloc((sizeof (int)) * 5);
(((((*p) = 1), ((*(p+1)) = 2)), ((*(p+2)) = 3)), ((*(p+3)) = 4)), ((*(p+4)) = 5);
for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++){
    printf("%d %p\n", (*(p++))++, p); 
}

That is:

  • sizeof has higher precedence than *
  • unary * has higher precedence than =, = has higher precedence than ,, and , is left associative
  • postfix ++ has higher precedence than unary *

There is no pointer arithmetic in your code because there are no pointers. int p declares an int.

That's why *p = 1 doesn't even compile, so this code doesn't actually do anything.

If you fix that, the code still doesn't do anything because the (*p++)++, p part in your printf call has undefined behavior: It's modifying p and reading from p without an intervening sequence point.

1

*p = 1, *(p+1) = 2, *(p+2) = 3, *(p+3) = 4, *(p+4) = 5;

is equivalent to (in that case, not always)

*p = 1; *(p+1) = 2; *(p+2) = 3; *(p+3) = 4; *(p+4) = 5;


concerning

printf("%d %p\n", (*p++)++, p);

the order of the execution or the arguments is indeterminate, so same for the result

P.S. next you put a code, please check before it is possible to compile it without error (int ptr = malloc(sizeof(int)*5); must be int * p = malloc(sizeof(int)*5);)

1

Let's draw some pictures. After the first two lines, you have the following:

   +---+---+---+---+---+
   | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |
   +---+---+---+---+---+
     ^
     |
     |
     |
   +---+
p: |   |
   +---+

The expression (*p++)++ is parsed as (*(p++))++ and is evaluated as follows:

  p++    - evaluate to the current value of p (&p[0]); as a side effect, 
           update `p` to point to the next object in the sequence (&p[1])
 *p++    - dereference the result of `p++` (p[0])
(*p++)++ - evaluate to the current value of the thing `p` points to 
           (1), then increment the value of that thing.

After that expression has been evaluated, our state is now

   +---+---+---+---+---+
   | 2 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |
   +---+---+---+---+---+
         ^
         |
     +---+
     |
   +---+
p: |   |
   +---+

The expression (*++p)++ is parsed as (*(++p))++ and evaluates as:

  ++p     - evaluate to the current value of p plus 1 (&p[2]), which gives us
            the address of the next object in the sequence; 
            update p to point to the next object (&p[2])
 *++p     - dereference the result of ++p (p[2])
(*++p)++  - evaluate to the current value of thing following what p currently 
            points to (3), and as a side effect increment that thing.

After that expression has been evaluated, our state is now

   +---+---+---+---+---+
   | 2 | 2 | 4 | 4 | 5 |
   +---+---+---+---+---+
             ^
             |
     +-------+
     |
   +---+
p: |   |
   +---+

You should be able to work out the other two. However...

The statement

printf("%d %p\n", (*p++)++, p);

invokes undefined behavior, because you're both trying to read p and update it without an intervening sequence point. The value that gets printed for p may or may not reflect the update from p++ or ++p. Function arguments are not guaranteed to be evaluated in any particular order.

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