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In Symfony 4.2, the Controller class is deprecated and you are supposed to make the switch to AbstractController, and therefore no longer have access to the $this->get('service.name') functionality with the exception of a few services that they are defining for you.

My base controller extends Symfony's Controller and has a function that utilizes the $this->get functionality:

public function getRepository($repository){
    $repo = $this->get($repository);
    if($this->authRepository !== null) {
        $repo->setPrefix($this->authRepository);
    }
    return $repo;
}

So in my controller I can say something like $this->getRepository('api.service'); and then it will load my service, set the prefix based on the request, and then return the configured api.service.

With the new AbstractController and autowiring/auto-injection of services, how can I tell my service to not only call the method setPrefix (which I know I can do), but tell it to use a parameter in my controller?

config so far:

api.service:
    class: App\ApiService
    calls:
        - method: setPrefix
          arguments:
              - '??????'
  • Which parameter? If you mean the first argument of the arguments array, it will be a class variable so you can call it with $this->.... If it's a service, can you type hint it to setPrefix(Here.. $something) and see if that works? symfony.com/doc/current/service_container/calls.html – Domagoj Jan 11 at 21:22
  • Why not autowire authRepository to your repositories via constructor? – Tomáš Votruba Jan 12 at 0:56
  • You might be able to do this with a factory which could have access to the request. – Cerad Jan 12 at 1:48
  • I was able to pull this off by setting up an event listener and then using a static variable the prefix class. Not ideal, but that value is then set once per call and every service has access to the data from that point forward. – Tim Withers Jan 17 at 20:16
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So this method as you posted above:

public function getRepository($repository){
    $repo = $this->get($repository);
    if($this->authRepository !== null) {
        $repo->setPrefix($this->authRepository);
    }
    return $repo;
}

Could be implemented like this with the new DependecyInjection:

class TestController extends AbstractController
{
    /**
     * @Route("/test", name="test")
     */
    public function test(App\ApiService $service)
    {
        $service->maybeSetPrefix($service);
        $service->call(...
    }

    // this can go into your own BaseController
    public function maybeSetPrefix($service)
    {
        if ($this->authRepository !== null) {
            $service->setPrefix($this->authRepository);
        }
    }
}

You would not need a service definition because Symfony DependencyInjection should autowire this already, but manually it would look like this:

App\ApiService:
    autowire: true
    autoconfigure: true
    public: false

So now we don't use services IDs like api.service any longer but the full qualified classname App\ApiService.

If you still want to leave the service referenceable via api.service you can add an alias service definition in addition:

api.service:
    alias: App\ApiService
    public: true

But maybe in your case you could let your App\ApiService decide how to initialise itself based on the request instead by the controller, like this:

class ApiService
{
    public function __construct(RequestStack $requestStack, AuthRepository $authRepository)
    {
        $request = $requestStack->getCurrentRequest();

        if ($request->get('option') === 'test') {
            $this->setPrefix($authRepository);
        }
    }

Maybe post some more details or example code of your current Controller logic if this doesn't help.

  • I like this, and this may be what I need to do... BUT literally EVERY function call would have a call to set the prefix, and that is what I was trying to avoid. – Tim Withers Jan 14 at 17:43
  • Sounds to me really like you want let ApiService initialise itself as in my last example or even create a Factory to create you Service. – Kim Jan 14 at 18:53

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